Catalogue


Knowledge Production, Pedagogy, and Institutions in Colonial India /
edited by Indra Sengupta and Daud Ali.
edition
1st edition
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xv, 256 p.
ISBN
0230113370 (hardback), 9780230113374 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230113370 (hardback)
9780230113374 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- PART I: PRODUCING COLONIAL KNOWLEDGE * What's in a (Proper) Name? Particulars, Individuals and Authorship in the Linguistic Survey of India and Colonial Scholarship -- Javed Majeed * The Floating Lexicon: Hobson-Jobson and the OED -- Kate Teltscher * Missions and Museums: Hindu Gods and Other "Abominations," 1820-1860 -- Geoffrey Oddie * Antiquarian Knowledge and Preservation of Indian Monuments at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century -- Ann Julie Etter * PART II: HISTORICAL PLACE, HISTORICAL PASTS * Landscapes of the Past: Rajatarangini and Historical Knowledge Production in Late-Nineteenth-Century Kashmir -- Chitralekha Zutshi * Jaunpur, Ruination, and Conservation during the Colonial Era -- Michael Dodson * The Qutb Minar in Sayyid Ahmad Khan's Asar us-anadid -- David Lelyveld * PART III: PEDAGOGY AND TRANSFORMATION * Promoting Scientism: Institutions for Gathering and Disseminating Knowledge in British Bihar -- Peter Gottschalk * Old Books in New Bindings: Ethics and Education in Colonial India -- Avril Powell * Teaching Emotions. Victorian Values and Sharafat in Nineteenth-century Delhi -- Margrit Pernau.
abstract
"This volume seeks to radically revise the Saidian analytical framework which dominated research on the subject of colonial knowledge for almost two decades and which emphasized colonial knowledge as a series of representations of colonial hegemony. It seeks to contribute substantially to research in the field by analyzing knowledge in colonial India as a dynamic process, produced in historically specific, and changing, social and intellectual contexts, and as an essentially unstable, fractured and contingent set of ideas and practices, produced in unpredictable and often self-contradictory ways for different audiences. It also focuses on the very important and neglected questions of indigenous agency in producing knowledge in colonial India and the related problem of knowledge dissemination and transmission"--
catalogue key
7648045
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Indra Sengupta is a Research Fellow in British Empire and Commonwealth History at the German Historical Institute London. She is the author of From Salon to Discipline: State, University and Indology in Germany, 1821-1914(2005) and has edited a special issue called Memory, History, and Colonialism: Engaging with Pierre Nora in Colonial and Postcolonial Contexts, Bulletin of the German Historical Institute London, Supplement 1 (2009). Daud Ali is a Senior Lecturer in Indian History at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. He is the author of Courtly Culture and Political Life in Early Medieval India (2004). He has also co-authored, with Ronald Inden and Jonathan Walters, Querying the Medieval: Texts and the History of Practice in South Asia (2000), and edited Invoking the Past: the Uses of History in South Asia (1999).
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a very timely collection. The issue of 'colonial knowledge' has been at the forefront of the study of South Asia for more than a decade. However, the paradigms originally informing it have become increasingly frayed, and the debates surrounding it ever more tired. This book offers to re-invigorate the issues and to take inquiries in more profitable directions."David Washbrook, Fellow, History, Trinity College, Cambridge
SThis is a very timely collection. The issue of colonial knowledge " has been at the forefront of the study of South Asia for more than a decade. However, the paradigms originally informing it have become increasingly frayed, and the debates surrounding it ever more tired. This book offers to re-invigorate the issues and to take inquiries in more profitable directions. ” David Washbrook, Fellow, History, Trinity College, Cambridge
'This is a very timely collection. The issue of 'colonial knowledge' has been at the forefront of the study of South Asia for more than a decade. However, the paradigms originally informing it have become increasingly frayed, and the debates surrounding it ever more tired. This book offers to re-invigorate the issues and to take inquiries in more profitable directions.' ” David Washbrook, Fellow, History, Trinity College, Cambridge
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A collection of essays from a global line-up of contributors presenting a new interpretation of the processes of producing and disseminating colonial knowledge in India
Long Description
The essays in this volume take up colonial knowledge as an analytical category in South Asian history. They contribute to long-standing debates around agency and power, as well as newer issues ”like the coherence of knowledge systems, architecture and materiality, and the dissemination and reception of knowledge ”through detailed empirical and textual work. They demonstrate that historically situated analyses provide the most nuanced answers to such questions. Taken together, they show that no single theory of colonial knowledge is possible and that knowledge had diverse uses and receptions in South Asia "s colonial past, just as it continues to have today.
Long Description
This volume seeks to radically revise the Saidian analytical framework which dominated research on the subject of colonial knowledge for almost two decades, which emphasized colonial knowledge as a series of representations of colonial hegemony. It seeks to contribute substantially to research in the field by analyzing knowledge in colonial India as a dynamic process, produced in historically specific, and changing, social and intellectual contexts, and as an essentially unstable, fractured and contingent set of ideas and practices, produced in unpredictable and often self-contradictory ways for different audiences. It also focuses on the very important and neglected questions of indigenous agency in producing knowledge in colonial India and the related problem of knowledge dissemination and transmission.
Main Description
The essays in this volume take up colonial knowledge as an analytical category in South Asian history. They contribute to long-standing debates around agency and power, as well as newer issueslike the coherence of knowledge systems, architecture and materiality, and the dissemination and reception of knowledgethrough detailed empirical and textual work. They demonstrate that historically situated analyses provide the most nuanced answers to such questions. Taken together, they show that no single theory of colonial knowledge is possible and that knowledge had diverse uses and receptions in South Asia's colonial past, just as it continues to have today.
Main Description
The essays in this volume take up colonial knowledge as an analytical category in South Asian history. They contribute to long-standing debates around agency and power, as well as newer issueslike the coherence of knowledge systems, architecture and materiality, and the dissemination and reception of knowledgethrough detailed empirical and textual work. They demonstrate that historically situated analyses provide the most nuanced answers to such questions. Taken together, theyshow that no single theory of colonial knowledge is possible and that knowledge had diverse uses and receptions in South Asia's colonial past, just as it continues to have today.
Main Description
This volume seeks to radically revise the Saidian analytical framework which dominated research on the subject of colonial knowledge for almost two decades and which emphasized colonial knowledge as a series of representations of colonial hegemony. It seeks to contribute substantially to research in the field by analyzing knowledge in colonial India as a dynamic process, produced in historically specific, and changing, social and intellectual contexts, and as an essentially unstable, fractured and contingent set of ideas and practices, produced in unpredictable and often self-contradictory ways for different audiences. It also focuses on the very important and neglected questions of indigenous agency in producing knowledge in colonial India and the related problem of knowledge dissemination and transmission.
Main Description
This volume seeks to radically revise the Saidian analytical framework which dominated research on the subject of colonial knowledge for almost two decades and which emphasized colonial knowledge as a series of representations of colonial hegemony. The essays presented here contribute to long standing debates around agency and power, as well as more recently discussed issueslike the coherence of knowledge systems, architecture and materiality, and the dissemination and reception of knowledgethrough detailed empirical and textual work. They demonstrate that highly situated analyses provide the most historically nuanced answers to such questions. Taken together, they show that no single theory of colonial knowledge is possible and that knowledge had diverse uses and receptions in South Asia's colonial past, as it continues to have in the present.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
List of Contributorsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Producing Colonial Knowledge
What's in a (Proper) Name? Particulars, Individuals, and Authorship in the Linguistic Survey of India and Colonial Scholarshipp. 19
The Floating Lexicon: Hobson-Jobson and the OEDp. 41
Missions and Museums: Hindu Gods and Other ôAbominations,ö 1820-1860p. 59
Antiquarian Knowledge and Preservation of Indian Monuments at the Beginning of the Nineteenth Centuryp. 75
Historical Places, Historical Pasts
Landscapes of the Past: Rajatarangini and Historical Knowledge Production in Late-Nineteenth-Century Kashmip. 99
Jaunpur, Ruination, and Conservation during the Colonial Erap. 123
The Qutb Minar in Sayyid Ahmad Khan's Asar us-Sanadidp. 147
Pedagogy and Transformation
Promoting Scientism: Institutions for Gathering and Disseminating Knowledge in British Biharp. 171
Old Books in New Bindings: Ethics and Education in Colonial Indiap. 199
Teaching Emotions: The Encounter between Victorian Values and Indo-Persian Concepts of Civility in Nineteenth-Century Delhip. 227
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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