Catalogue


First Nations in the twenty-first century /
James S. Frideres.
imprint
Don Mills, Ont. : Oxford University Press, c2011.
description
xi, 252 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0195441435, 9780195441437
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Don Mills, Ont. : Oxford University Press, c2011.
isbn
0195441435
9780195441437
catalogue key
7647988
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [229]-241) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A substantial leap forward in the field... Excellent organization of complex information goes a long way... to clarify the paradoxical, dishonest, and contradictory policy frameworks shaping First Nations peoples' experiences across time and space." --Mary Ellen Donnan, Bishop's University
"A substantial leap forward in the field...Excellent organization of complex information goes a long way...to clarify the paradoxical, dishonest, and contradictory policy frameworks shaping First Nations peoples' experiences across time and space."--Mary Ellen Donnan, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, Bishop's University "[Frideres] has provided excellent detail allowing a first time reader the opportunity to grasp these events. Rather than simply taking a chronological approach, the author has taken a thematic approach which allows for compartmentalization of key themes. This allows instructors to discuss main themes in class based on readings that do not have to be understood in chronological order...The narrative is accurate and brings a number of interpretations to the reader's attention."--Rob Nestor, Lecturer, University of Regina
"[Frideres] has provided excellent detail allowing a first time reader the opportunity to grasp these events. Rather than simply taking a chronological approach, the author has taken a thematic approach which allows for compartmentalization of key themes. This allows instructors to discussmain themes in class based on readings that do not have to be understood in chronological order... The narrative is accurate and brings a number of interpretations to the reader's attention." --Rob Nestor, University of Regina
"A substantial leap forward in the field... Excellent organization of complex information goes a long way... to clarify the paradoxical, dishonest, and contradictory policy frameworks shaping First Nations peoples' experiences across time and space." --Mary Ellen Donnan, Bishop's University"[Frideres] has provided excellent detail allowing a first time reader the opportunity to grasp these events. Rather than simply taking a chronological approach, the author has taken a thematic approach which allows for compartmentalization of key themes. This allows instructors to discuss main themes in class based on readings that do not have to be understood in chronological order... The narrative is accurate and brings a number of interpretations to thereader's attention." --Rob Nestor, University of Regina
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Summaries
Main Description
In this exciting new addition to Oxford's acclaimed Themes in Canadian Sociology series, author James S. Frideres examines the ways in which colonization and government action - and inaction - have impacted First Nations peoples in Canada over the last three centuries. Unlike most undergraduate textbooks in this area, which tend to focus on all three Aboriginal groups in Canada, First Nations in the Twenty-First Century is a concise yet comprehensive text that focuses exclusively on First Nations peoples. Covering such crucial topics as trauma, health and well-being, language, law, and politics, this important and innovative text is an indispensable core or supplemental resource for undergraduate courses that focus on First Nations peoples.
Main Description
First Nations in the Twenty-First Century is a concise yet comprehensive introduction to the continuing repercussions of colonialism in Canada. Focusing exclusively on First Nations peoples, this innovative new text addresses crucial issues such as the legacy of residential schools;intergenerational trauma; Aboriginal languages and culture; health and well-being on reserves; self-government and federal responsibility; the political economy of First Nations; and the federal Indian Affairs bureaucracy. Through an in-depth treatment of historical and contemporary topics,including recent court decisions and government legislations, students will learn about the experiences of First Nations peoples and their complex, evolving relationship with the rest of Canada.

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