Catalogue


The limits of gender domination : women, the law, and political crisis in Quito, 1765-1830 /
Chad Thomas Black.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2010.
description
xii, 355 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0826349234 (Paper), 9780826349231 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2010.
isbn
0826349234 (Paper)
9780826349231 (Paper)
contents note
Quito 1765: justice, rebellion, reform -- Practice I: sexed crimes -- Practice II: women, property, civil dispute -- Quito 1809: in defense of religion, king, and Patría -- Practice III: in the name of king and constitution -- Practice IV: in the name of the law.
catalogue key
7645604
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 329-347) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
By documenting the progressive removal of limits to patriarchal power in the waning years of the Spanish Empire in Quito, this study traces the genealogy of legal patriarchy in Spanish America.
Summaries
Main Description
Set against the backdrop of the tumultuous late colonial and early republican periods in Quito (1765-1830), this study examines women's legal, economic, and social status in order to gauge the relationship between the increasingly centralized power of the Bourbon kingship and the local operation of social authority. A gendered reading of judicial documents, legal literatures, and institution discourses reveals that Bourbon attempts to restrict women's access to legal resources were resisted by a traditional local legal culture based on practices of consultation, negotiation, judicial discretion, and contingency. This customary judicial practice, Black argues, played a fundamental role in limiting gender domination and prevented the full realization of a legal, economic, or social patriarchy in colonial Quito. By documenting the progressive removal of limits to patriarchal power in the waning years of the Spanish Empire in Quito, this study traces the genealogy of legal patriarchy in Spanish America.
Main Description
Set against the backdrop of the tumultuous late-colonial and early-republican periods in Quito (1765-1830), this study examines women's legal, economic, and social status in order to gauge the relationship between the increasingly centralized power of the Bourbon kingship and the local operation of social authority. The customary judicial practice, Black argues, played a fundamental role in limiting gender domination and prevented the full realization of a legal, economic, or social patriarchy in colonial Quito, Ecuador.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
1765-1809p. 27
Quito 1765: Justice, Rebellion, Reformp. 29
Practice I: Sexed Crimesp. 72
Practice II: Women, Property, Civil Disputep. 121
1809-1830p. 163
Quito 1809: In Defense of Religion, King, and Patríap. 165
Practice III: In the Name of King and Constitutionp. 202
Practice IV: In the Name of the Lawp. 225
Occupations in the Santa Bárbara Padrón, 1768p. 263
List of Adulterous Couples from the Pueblo of Chillogallo, 1790p. 265
Licensure Totals, 1765-1829p. 267
Notesp. 273
Bibliographyp. 329
Indexp. 348
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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