Catalogue

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America responds to terrorism : conflict resolution strategies of Clinton, Bush, and Obama /
Karen A. Feste.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
276 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230623565 (hardback), 9780230623569 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230623565 (hardback)
9780230623569 (hardback)
abstract
"What policy is best for the United States to reduce the threat of Islamic extremist terrorism? Recent American presidents have applied alternative conflict resolution approaches. Clinton practiced conflict avoidance, talking tough but rarely retaliating against anti-American terrorist attacks. G. W. Bush adopted a fighter approach and the Global War on Terrorism and military interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq reflect this strategy. Obama introduced a third alternative: problem solving and extending peaceful overtures while keeping up resistance. Will the strategy succeed? Feste analyzes presidential rhetoric on counterterrorism policy through the lens of issue framing, enemy aggression, self -hardship, and victimization expressed in a variety of speeches delivered by these chief executives to highlight and compare their conflict resolution strategies"--
catalogue key
7636739
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [247]-265) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Karen A. Feste is a Professor at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies. She directs the Conflict Resolution, and International Security graduate programs. Her previous publications include Plans for Peace: Negotiation and the Arab-Israeli Conflict; Expanding the Frontiers: Superpower Intervention in the Cold War; Intervention: Shaping the Global Order; and Terminate Terrorism: Framing, Gaming, and Negotiating Conflicts.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-01-01:
The concept of framing is the foundation of this book. If readers do not accept the premise that "deciding what to do when facing a problem or situation will depend on how the issue is framed," then they will not subscribe to its central argument, which is that a president's description of an event determines the response to that event. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that context, particularly in foreign affairs and particularly in times of crisis, dictates actions. There is no doubt that framing is a factor in the US response to 9/11, the concept of a war on terror being a case in point, but that frame was only one of several variables in guiding a response, and not the most important one at that. If George H. W. Bush or William Jefferson Clinton had been president on September 11, 2001, the US response likely would have been very much the same. Consequently, this book suffers because of its rather extravagant claim. Framing is a factor but under what circumstances and to what extent? Those are the questions that Feste (Univ. of Denver Josef Korbel School of International Studies) needs to address. Summing Up: Optional. Research collections. D. P. Franklin Georgia State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Feste develops a framework of terrorism termination dynamics and applies it to the current al Qaeda problem to offer a new method for tracking development of terrorist episodes
Long Description
What policy is best for the United States to reduce the threat of Islamic extremist terrorism? Recent American presidents have applied alternative conflict resolution approaches. Clinton practiced conflict avoidance, talking tough but rarely retaliating against anti-American terrorist attacks. G. W. Bush adopted a fighter approach and the Global War on Terrorism and military interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq reflect this strategy. Obama introduced a third alternative: problem solving and extending peaceful overtures while keeping up resistance. Will the strategy succeed? Feste analyzes presidential rhetoric on counterterrorism policy through the lens of issue framing, enemy aggression, self -hardship, and victimization expressed in a variety of speeches delivered by these chief executives to highlight and compare their conflict resolution strategies.
Library of Congress Summary
"What policy is best for the United States to reduce the threat of Islamic extremist terrorism? Recent American presidents have applied alternative conflict resolution approaches. Clinton practiced conflict avoidance, talking tough but rarely retaliating against anti-American terrorist attacks. G. W. Bush adopted a fighter approach and the Global War on Terrorism and military interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq reflect this strategy. Obama introduced a third alternative: problem solving and extending peaceful overtures while keeping up resistance. Will the strategy succeed? Feste analyzes presidential rhetoric on counterterrorism policy through the lens of issue framing, enemy aggression, self -hardship, and victimization expressed in a variety of speeches delivered by these chief executives to highlight and compare their conflict resolution strategies"--
Main Description
This study develops a framework of terrorism termination dynamics constructed from empirical cases and applies it to the current al Qaeda problem to offer a new method for tracking development of terrorist episodes with implications for U.S. foreign policy.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Frame Theoryp. 15
Presidential Frames of Terrorismp. 33
Framing Conflict Escalation: United States versus al Qaeda/Islamic Extremismp. 49
Framing the Terrorism Threatp. 73
Framing Terrorism Conflict Resolutionp. 101
Framing Analysis: Evaluating Presidential Statementsp. 133
Conflict Avoidance Strategyp. 165
Fight-to-Win Strategyp. 183
Problem-Solving Strategyp. 203
Conclusionp. 229
Appendixp. 239
Notesp. 241
Bibliographyp. 247
Indexp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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