Catalogue


Encyclopedia of themes in literature /
Jennifer McClinton-Temple, editor.
imprint
New York : Facts On File, 2011.
description
3 v.
ISBN
9780816071616 (hc : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Facts On File, 2011.
isbn
9780816071616 (hc : alk. paper)
contents note
Vol. I. Part I: Themes A-Z. Part II: Authors A-E -- Vol. II. Part II: Authors F-M -- Vol. III. Part II: Authors N-Z
catalogue key
7636649
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter
The unique, three-volume Encyclopedia of Themes in Literature offers both a survey of literary themes and a collection of in-depth analyses of how these themes operate in individual literary works. Part I of this comprehensive new set contains essays on 50 prominent literary themes, with each essay describing how the theme has evolved over time, how it relates to other important themes, and why this theme is powerful enough to recur so often in great literature. Part II contains essays on specific themes in more than 300 individual classic works of literature. Each section on a particular work contains a brief introduction to the work as well as three essays on different literary themes within the work. Themes covered include alienation, coming of age, heroism, innocence and experience, race, science and technology, and more.
A helpful index and cross-references round out this invaluable set for students of literature.
Literary works covered include:
Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (related themes: gender, love, pride)
Emily Dickinson's poems (related themes: death, nature, spirituality)
Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (related themes: identity, memory, race)
F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby (related themes: the American dream, identity, social class)
Shirley Jackson's The Lottery (related themes: individual and society, tradition, violence)
Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day (related themes: alienation, ethics, regret)
Arthur Miller's The Crucible (related themes: alienation, community, spirituality)
Edgar Allan Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher (related themes: death, identity, illness)
William Shakespeare's Hamlet (related themes: death, justice, love).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-07-01:
Unlike individual volumes in the Chelsea House "Bloom's Literary Themes" series or in Gale's "Literary Themes for Students," this three-volume encyclopedia compiles themes into a stand-alone reference. The 50 themes (listed in the first volume) vary from abandonment to grief to race. Works covered (more than 300, also listed in the first volume) are frequently studied novels, plays, poems, and short stories. Readers will find Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees, and Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. The set is well organized. The first part provides essays of roughly 750 words defining each theme, its evolution over time and relation to other key themes, and why it holds a place in literary criticism. The second part examines the themes within individual works, with three signed essays on different literary themes within the article. For example, the section on Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? includes essays on alienation, family, and violence. The thematic analysis is preceded by a brief biography of the author and a contextual setting for the work--just enough information to leave room for an individual student's critical thinking. Cross-references enhance the encyclopedia. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-level undergraduates; general readers. E. L. Bagley Agnes Scott College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-04-15:
This three-volume set provides two distinct and thorough methods of examining the concept of literary themes. Volume 1 collects 50 essays on specific themes like abandonment, coming-of-age, futility, oppression, social class, and violence. Employing a general but interdisciplinary approach, the essays describe the evolution of theme, including its historical development and its use by particular authors. The other method of examination comes via basic information on approximately 300-plus work-specific entries by title, each of which is followed by three essays looking at that work's themes, e.g., death, identity, and illness in Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher." A lengthy index in Volume 3 and cross-references within the general essays, as well as in the evaluations of individual titles, increase the set's value. The author of the analysis is identified and provides suggestions for further reading. Editor McClinton-Temple (English, King's Coll.) is also general editor of the Encyclopedia of American Indian Literature. Designed to help high school students conduct research, the selections come mostly from familiar, classic English-language authors, though other writers like Milan Kundera (Franco-Czech), Hanif Kureishi (Indian British), Cao Xueqin (Chinese), and Rudolfo Anaya (Mexican) are included. BOTTOM LINE A useful volume for writing research papers and gaining insight into literary theme. Recommended for high school students and beginning undergraduates.-Marilyn Lary, San Bernardino, CA (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2011
Booklist, June 2011
Choice, July 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work offers both a survey of literary themes and a collection of in-depth analyses of how these themes operate in individual literary works. Each section on a particular work contains a brief introduction to the work as well as three essays on different literary themes within the work.
Main Description
Offers a survey of the major literary themes and a collection of in-depth analyses of how these themes operate in individual literary works.
Main Description
The unique, three-volume Encyclopedia of Themes in Literature offers both a survey of literary themes and a collection of in-depth analyses of how these themes operate in individual literary works. Part I of this comprehensive new set contains essays on 50 prominent literary themes, with each essay describing how the theme has evolved over time, how it relates to other important themes, and why this theme is powerful enough to recur so often in great literature. Part II contains essays on specific themes in more than 300 individual classic works of literature. Each section on a particular work contains a brief introduction to the work as well as three essays on different literary themes within the work. Themes covered include alienation, coming of age, heroism, innocence and experience, race, science and technology, and more.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem