Catalogue


Andrew Johnson's Civil War and reconstruction /
Paul H. Bergeron.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2011.
description
xii, 299 p.
ISBN
1572337486 (hardcover), 9781572337480 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2011.
isbn
1572337486 (hardcover)
9781572337480 (hardcover)
catalogue key
7628138
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [225]-276) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
Among presidential historians, Andrew Johnson remains one of the US's most ridiculed chief executives. He not only was the first president to be impeached, but also fought tooth and nail with his own cabinet and congressional leaders. Yet Hans Trefousse's Andrew Johnson: A Biography (CH, Jan'90, 27-2908) revealed that with a firm dedication to the Constitution, Johnson singlehandedly saved the US presidency from becoming a glorified administrative position while he worked toward a prompt reintegration of the Union after a devastating Civil War. It is these elements, perhaps, that have spawned recent reassessments of Johnson's historical legacy. Bergeron (emer., Univ. of Tennessee), one of the primary editors of The Papers of Andrew Johnson (1967-2000), reveals a more intricate portrait of the 17th president and his tumultuous time in office. Bergeron's scholarly volume, written in clear prose, delves deep into primary administration sources and paints a more distinct picture than previously presented. Assuming the presidency under the worst of circumstances, Johnson rose to the occasion, decisively promoting his predecessor's Reconstruction policies as his own while incurring the wrath of Republican Party leaders who sought to punish the South. Bergeron's well-researched tome is a highly readable account of an anxious time fronted by a noble yet irascible character. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. M. J. C. Taylor Paine College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
Few figures in American political history are as reviled as Andrew Johnson, the seventeenth president of the United States. Taking office after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, he clashed constantly with Congress during the tumultuous early years of Reconstruction. He opposed federally-mandated black suffrage and the Fourteenth Amendment and vetoed the Freedmen’s Bureau and Civil Rights bills. In this new book, Paul H. Bergeron, a respected Johnson scholar, brings a new perspective on this often vilified figure. Previous books have judged Johnson out of the context of his times or through a partisan lens. But this volume-based on Bergeron’s work as the editor of The Papers of Andrew Johnson-takes a more balanced approach to Johnson and his career. Admiring Johnson's unswerving devotion to the Union, Lincoln appointed him as military governor of Tennessee, a post, Bergeron argues, that enhanced Johnson's executive experience and his national stature. While governor, Johnson implemented the emancipation of slaves in the state and laid the foundation for a new civilian government. Bergeron also notes that Johnson developed a close connection with the president which eventually resulted in his vice-presidential candidacy. In many respects, therefore, Johnson's Civil War years served as preparation for his presidency. Bergeron moves beyond simplistic arguments based on Johnson’s racism to place his presidency within the politics of the day. Putting aside earlier analyses of the conflict between Johnson and the Republican Radicals as ideological disputes, Bergeron discusses these battles as a political power struggle. In doing so, he does not deny Johnson’s racism but provides a more nuanced and effective perspective on the issues as Johnson tried to pursue the “politics of the possible.” Bergeron interprets Johnson as a strong-willed, decisive, fearless, authoritarian leader in the tradition of Andrew Jackson. While never excusing Johnson’s inflexibility and extreme racism, Bergeron makes the case that, in proper context, Johnson can be seen at times as a surprisingly effective commander-in-chief-one whose approach to the problems of reestablishing the Union was defensible and consistent. With its fresh insight on the man and his times, Andrew Johnson’s Civil War and Reconstruction is indispensable reading for students and scholars of the U.S. presidency and the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.
Main Description
Few figures in American political history are as reviled as Andrew Johnson, the seventeenth president of the United States. Taking office after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, he clashed constantly with Congress during the tumultuous early years of Reconstruction. He opposed black suffrage and the Fourteenth Amendment and vetoed the Freedman’s Bureau and Civil Rights bills. A proponent of white supremacy, Johnson has long been considered one of the nation’s worst presidents. In this new book, Paul H. Bergeron, the preeminent Johnson scholar, brings a new perspective on this often vilified figure. Previous books have judged Johnson out of the context of his times or through a partisan lens. But this volume-based on Bergeron’s years as the editor of The Papers of Andrew Johnson -takes a more balanced approach to Johnson and his career. Bergeron moves beyond simplistic arguments based on Johnson’s racism to place his presidency within the politics of the day. Putting aside earlier analyses of the conflict between Johnson and the Republican Radicals as ethical disputes, Bergeron discusses these battles as a political power struggle. In doing so, he does not deny Johnson’s racism but provides a more nuanced and effective perspective on the issues as Johnson tried to pursue the “politics of possible.” Bergeron interprets Johnson as a strong-willed, decisive, fearless, authoritarian leader in the tradition of Andrew Jackson. While never excusing Johnson’s inflexibility and extreme racism, Bergeron makes the case that, in proper context, Johnson can be seen at times as a surprisingly effective commander-in-chief-one whose approach to the problems of reestablishing the Union was defensible and consistent. With its fresh insight on the man and his times, Andrew Johnson’s Civil War and Reconstruction is indispensable reading for students and scholars of the U.S. presidency and the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.
Description for Bookstore
“Bergeron has written a very original book quite unlike any modern study of Johnson. Bound to create quite a bit of controversy among scholars and Civil War enthusiasts, Bergeron seeks to provide a balanced analysis of this much-vilified figure.” -John David Smith, Charles H. Stone Distinguished Professor of American History, UNC Charlotte “This book serves as a much-needed reflection on the most recent scholarship on Andrew Johnson and provides the perspective of a historian who has a justifiable claim to be the most prominent expert on Johnson. Bergeron moves beyond simplistic arguments based on Johnson’s racism to place his presidency within the politics of the period. He provides a more complex, and effective, perspective on the issues as Johnson tried to pursue the ‘politics of the possible.’” -Richard B. McCaslin, author of Andrew Johnson: A Bibliography Few figures in American political history are as reviled as Andrew Johnson, the seventeenth president of the United States. Taking office after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, he clashed constantly with Congress during the tumultuous early years of Reconstruction. He opposed federally-mandated black suffrage and the Fourteenth Amendment and vetoed the Freedmen’s Bureau and Civil Rights bills. In this new book, Paul H. Bergeron, a respected Johnson scholar, brings a new perspective on this often vilified figure. Previous books have judged Johnson out of the context of his times or through a partisan lens. But this volume-based on Bergeron’s work as the editor of The Papers of Andrew Johnson-takes a more balanced approach to Johnson and his career. Admiring Johnson's unswerving devotion to the Union, Lincoln appointed him as military governor of Tennessee, a post, Bergeron argues, that enhanced Johnson's executive experience and his national stature. While governor, Johnson implemented the emancipation of slaves in the state and laid the foundation for a new civilian government. Bergeron also notes that Johnson developed a close connection with the president which eventually resulted in his vice-presidential candidacy. In many respects, therefore, Johnson's Civil War years served as preparation for his presidency. Bergeron moves beyond simplistic arguments based on Johnson’s racism to place his presidency within the politics of the day. Putting aside earlier analyses of the conflict between Johnson and the Republican Radicals as ideological disputes, Bergeron discusses these battles as a political power struggle. In doing so, he does not deny Johnson’s racism but provides a more nuanced and effective perspective on the issues as Johnson tried to pursue the “politics of the possible.” Bergeron interprets Johnson as a strong-willed, decisive, fearless, authoritarian leader in the tradition of Andrew Jackson. While never excusing Johnson’s inflexibility and extreme racism, Bergeron makes the case that, in proper context, Johnson can be seen at times as a surprisingly effective commander-in-chief-one whose approach to the problems of reestablishing the Union was defensible and consistent. With its fresh insight on the man and his times, Andrew Johnson’s Civil War and Reconstruction is indispensable reading for students and scholars of the U.S. presidency and the Civil War and Reconstruction periods. Paul H. Bergeron was the editor of the Papers of Andrew Johnson , volumes 8–16, from 1987 to 2000. He is the author of The Presidency of James K. Polk and coauthor of Tennesseans and Their History . He is professor of history emeritus at the University of Tennessee.

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