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The Conservative Party and the extreme right, 1945-75 /
Mark Pitchford.
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2011.
description
viii, 243 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
071908363X (hbk.) :, 9780719083631 (hbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2011.
isbn
071908363X (hbk.) :
9780719083631 (hbk.) :
catalogue key
7614940
 
Includes bibliography: (p. 229-238) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark Pitchford is a Visiting Research Fellow at King's College, London
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
Pitchford offers an inside view of the response of the British Conservative Party to extreme right-wing movements following WW II. The danger of populist and extreme right-wing pressure is not only that some form of fascism might arise, but a more reasonable fear that politics will be turned to the Right, and hence policy may reflect anti-progressive directions that divide the polity. American domestic politics since 2008 has experienced a comparable pull from the extreme Right that has divided the Republican Party and given a minority profound influence. In contrast, Pitchford shows that in Britain the Conservative Party resisted extreme interests, and instead found ways to exclude the extreme Right while playing a singular role at the center. By holding the center and blocking the extreme Right the Conservatives helped Britain develop more cohesion in the aftermath of WW II. It is a compelling history showing how the Tories and their Party bureaucracy learned valuable lessons from their sanguine attitudes toward fascism prior to WW II. This is an important lesson. As modern political parties keep to the center, they may produce a greater public good. The book is strongly recommended for political scientists and historians of modern political parties and British politics. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. R. Brunello Eckerd College
Reviews
Review Quotes
Pitchford has, for the first time, brought together details of the myriad groups that exisited on the Party's Right in the 30 years after the end of the Second World War.
Pitchford treats the reader to an investigation of organizations well beyond the usual suspects of the National Front and the Monday Club.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text shows how the Conservative Party, realising that its well-documented pre-Second World War connections with the extreme right were now embarrassing, used its bureaucracy to implement a policy of investigating extreme right groups and taking action to minimise their chances of success.
Main Description
Mark Pitchford explores the Conservative Party's relationship with the extreme right between 1945 and 1975. For the first time, this book shows how the Conservative Party, realizing that its well known pre-Second World War connections with the extreme right were now embarrassing, used its bureaucracy to implement a policy of investigating extreme right groups and taking action to minimize their chances of success.
Main Description
This book reveals the Conservative Party#146;s relationship with the extreme right between 1945 and 1975. For the first time, this book shows how the Conservative Party, realising that its well known pre-Second World War connections with the extreme right were now embarrassing, used its bureaucracy to implement a policy of investigating extreme right groups and taking action to minimise their chances of success. The book focuses on the Conservative Party#146;s investigation of right-wing groups, and shows how its perception of their nature determined the party bureaucracy#146;s response. The book draws a comparison between the Conservative Party machine#146;s negative attitude towards the extreme right and its support for progressive groups. It concludes that the Conservative Party acted as a persistent block to the external extreme right in a number of ways, and that the Party bureaucracy persistently denied the extreme right within the party assistance, access to funds, and representation within party organisations. It reaches a climax with the formulation of #145;plan#146; threatening its own candidate if he failed to remove the extreme right from the Conservative Monday Club.
Main Description
This book reveals the Conservative Party’s relationship with the extreme right between 1945 and 1975.Commentators frequently cite the relationship between the Conservative Party and the extreme right. For the first time, this book shows how the Conservative Party, realising that its wel-documented pre-Second World War connections with the extreme right were now embarrassing, used its bureaucracy to implement a policy of investigating extreme right groups and taking action to minimise their chances of success.The book focuses on the Conservative Party’s investigation of right-wing groups, and shows how its perception of their nature determined the party bureaucracy’s response. It draws on extensive information from the Conservative Party Archive, supported by other sources, including interviews with leading players in the events of the 1970s. The book draws a comparison between the Conservative Party machine’s negative attitude towards the extreme right and its support for progressive groups. It concludes that the Conservative Party acted as a persistent block to the external extreme right in a number of ways, and that the Party bureaucracy persistently denied the extreme right within the party assistance, access to funds, and representation within party organisations. It reaches a climax with the formulation of a ‘plan’ threatening its own candidate if he failed to remove the extreme right from the Conservative Monday Club.This book examines a topic that is of enduring interest. It will appeal to students and enthusiasts alike, and become a standard textbook for undergraduates and postgraduates.
Main Description
This book reveals the Conservative Party’s relationship with the extreme right between 1945 and 1975.Commentators frequently cite the relationship between the Conservative Party and the extreme right. For the first time, this book shows how the Conservative Party, realising that its wel-documented pre-Second World War connections with the extreme right were now embarrassing, used its bureaucracy to implement a policy of investigating extreme right groups and taking action to minimise their chances of success.The book focuses on the Conservative Party’s investigation of right-wing groups, and shows how its perception of their nature determined the party bureaucracy’s response. It draws on extensive information from the Conservative Party Archive, supported by other sources, including interviews with leading players in the events of the 1970s. The book draws a comparison between the Conservative Party machine’s negative attitude towards the extreme right and its support for progressive groups. It concludes that the Conservative Party acted as a persistent block to the external extreme right in a number of ways, and that the Party bureaucracy persistently denied the extreme right within the party assistance, access to funds, and representation within party organisations. It reaches a climax with the formulation of a ‘plan’ threatening its own candidate if he failed to remove the extreme right from the Conservative Monday Club.This book examines a topic that is of enduring interest. It will appeal to students and enthusiasts alike, and become a standard textbook for undergraduates and postgraduates.
Main Description
This book reveals the Conservative Party's relationship with the extreme right between 1945 and 1975. For the first time, this book shows how the Conservative Party, realising that its well known pre-Second World War connections with the extreme right were now embarrassing, used its bureaucracy to implement a policy of investigating extreme right groups and taking action to minimise their chances of success.The book focuses on the Conservative Party's investigation of right-wing groups, and shows how its perception of their nature determined the party bureaucracy's response. The book draws a comparison between the Conservative Party machine's negative attitude towards the extreme right and its support for progressive groups. It concludes that the Conservative Party acted as a persistent block to the external extreme right in a number of ways, and that the Party bureaucracy persistently denied the extreme right within the party assistance, access to funds, and representation within party organisations. It reaches a climax with the formulation of 'plan' threatening its own candidate if he failed to remove the extreme right from the Conservative Monday Club.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. vi
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 1
The shock of opposition, 1945-51p. 10
Consensus Conservatism and extreme-right revival, 1951-57p. 39
Macmillan and Home: 'pink socialism' and 'true-blue' Conservatism, 1957-64p. 69
Edward Heath: a rightwards turn and the coalescence of the extreme right, 1964-70p. 125
'Heathco' meets the extreme-right's challenge, 1970-75p. 181
Conclusion: keeping it rightp. 219
Bibliographyp. 229
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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