Catalogue


Double agents : cultural and political brokerage in early modern Europe /
edited by Marika Keblusek and Badeloch Vera Noldus.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
description
xv, 280 p., 21 p. of plates : ill.
ISBN
9789004202696 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
isbn
9789004202696 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : double agents in early modern Europe / Marika Keblusek -- The embassy of art : diplomats as cultural brokers / Marika Keblusek -- Art and patronage : Sir Henry Wotton and the Venetian embassy, 1604-1624 / Robert Hill -- Giovanni Andrea Doria : citizen of Genoa, prince of Melfi, agent of King Philip II of Spain / Thomas Kirk -- Politics and letters : Gisbert Cuper as a servant of two republics / Bianca Chen -- Mercator sapiens : merchants as cultural entrepreneurs / Marika Keblusek -- Acquiring artistic expertise : the agent Daniel Nijs and his contacts with artists in Venice / Maartje van Gelder -- Garcia de Yllan : a merchant in silver, bread and bullets and a broker in art, 1591-1655 / Maurits A. Ebben -- The pretext of pictures : artists as cultural and political agents / Marika Keblusek -- Like a spider in its web : agent and artist Michel le Blon and his northern European network / Badeloch Vera Noldus -- John Dowland's employment at the royal Danish court : musician, agent-and spy? / Peter Hauge -- Travels of a court jester : Gonzalo de Liano, art agent at the court of King Philip II of Spain / Susanne Kubersky-Piredda and Salvador Salort Pons -- 'From Russia with love' : agents and their victims / Martin Donike.
catalogue key
7611527
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Marika Keblusek, Ph.D. (1997) in Book History, Leiden University, is Assistant Professor in Art History at Leiden University. She has published widely on book history and cultural history including Your Humble Servant Agents in Early Modern Europe (2006). Badeloch Vera Noldus, Ph.D. (2002) in Architectural History, Utrecht University, is heritage consultant in Copenhagen. She has published on cultural exchange and art history, including Trade in Good Taste (2004), Your Humble Servant (2006) and Pieter Isaacsz (2007).
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
AcknowledgementsDiplomats, merchants and artists figure prominently in this book, and have been central to our research project Double Agents. Cultural and Political Brokerage in Early Modern Europe. Financed by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research and facilitated by Leiden University, the project started in March 2002 and concluded with an international and interdisciplinary conference in December 2006.In the intermediate years, we have benefited greatly from the generosity and hospitality of many academic institutions, libraries and archives, both in the Netherlands and abroad: Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines / Pallas, Leiden; Det Kongelige Bibliotek and Rigsarkivet, Copenhagen; European University Institute, Florence; Stiftelsen Riksantikvarien Ingvar Anderssons Fond, Landsarkivet, Göteborg; Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität, Greifswald; Det Nationalhistoriske Museum på Frederiksborg Slot, Hillerød; Hessisches Staatsarchiv, Marburg; Carl von Ossietzky Universität, Oldenburg; Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Rome; Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut, Rome; Det Kungliga Biblioteket, Skokloster Museum and Riksarkivet, Stockholm; Herzog August Bibliothek and Niedersächsisches Staatsarchiv, Wolfenbüttel.Like the early modern agents, who depended largely on their personal and professional contacts to be able to function succesfully, we would not have been able to pursue our research had we not been able to enjoy the support and wisdom of our own, contemporary, networks. We would like to thank Michael Auwers, Helmut Backhaus, Paul Begheyn SJ, Jill Bepler, Marten Jan Bok, Elke Bujok, Pierre Burger, Hans Cools, Heiko Droste, Christoph Franck, Dagmar Freist, Peter Gillgren, Ebeltje Hartkamp-Jonxis, Linda Hinners, Irene Jacobs, Helen Jacobsen, Koenraad Jonckheere, Alexandra Lapierre, Arne Losman, Joachim Lund, Peter Björn Kerber, Bengt Kylberg, Friso Lammertse, Mark Meadow, Gerhard Menk, Michael North, Juliette Roding, Frits Scholten, Arne Spohr, Arno Strohmeyer, Kees Teszelsky, Susan Tipton, Wardy Poelstra, Judith Pollmann, Sebastian Posth, Hanne Kolind Poulsen, Jaap van der Veen, Anuschka Tischer, Rebecca Tucker and Stephen Turk Christensen for supplying us with great ideas, valuable advice, intellectual stimulation and warm friendship.
First Chapter
Acknowledgements Diplomats, merchants and artists figure prominently in this book, and have been central to our research project Double Agents. Cultural and Political Brokerage in Early Modern Europe. Financed by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research and facilitated by Leiden University, the project started in March 2002 and concluded with an international and interdisciplinary conference in December 2006. In the intermediate years, we have benefited greatly from the generosity and hospitality of many academic institutions, libraries and archives, both in the Netherlands and abroad: Leiden University Institute for Cultural Disciplines / Pallas, Leiden; Det Kongelige Bibliotek and Rigsarkivet, Copenhagen; European University Institute, Florence; Stiftelsen Riksantikvarien Ingvar Anderssons Fond, Landsarkivet, Göteborg; Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität, Greifswald; Det Nationalhistoriske Museum på Frederiksborg Slot, Hillerød; Hessisches Staatsarchiv, Marburg; Carl von Ossietzky Universität, Oldenburg; Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Rome; Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut, Rome; Det Kungliga Biblioteket, Skokloster Museum and Riksarkivet, Stockholm; Herzog August Bibliothek and Niedersächsisches Staatsarchiv, Wolfenbüttel. Like the early modern agents, who depended largely on their personal and professional contacts to be able to function succesfully, we would not have been able to pursue our research had we not been able to enjoy the support and wisdom of our own, contemporary, networks. We would like to thank Michael Auwers, Helmut Backhaus, Paul Begheyn SJ, Jill Bepler, Marten Jan Bok, Elke Bujok, Pierre Burger, Hans Cools, Heiko Droste, Christoph Franck, Dagmar Freist, Peter Gillgren, Ebeltje Hartkamp-Jonxis, Linda Hinners, Irene Jacobs, Helen Jacobsen, Koenraad Jonckheere, Alexandra Lapierre, Arne Losman, Joachim Lund, Peter Björn Kerber, Bengt Kylberg, Friso Lammertse, Mark Meadow, Gerhard Menk, Michael North, Juliette Roding, Frits Scholten, Arne Spohr, Arno Strohmeyer, Kees Teszelsky, Susan Tipton, Wardy Poelstra, Judith Pollmann, Sebastian Posth, Hanne Kolind Poulsen, Jaap van der Veen, Anuschka Tischer, Rebecca Tucker and Stephen Turk Christensen for supplying us with great ideas, valuable advice, intellectual stimulation and warm friendship.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The chapters making up this volume focus on individuals and professional groups who, in the course of their careers, became involved in multiple modes of cultural and political transfer.
Description for Reader
All those interested in early modern history, the history of (informal) diplomacy, the history of cultural transfer, the history of collecting; art history of the early modern period; intellectual history.
Long Description
The early modern system of brokerage as a widespread practice of transmission and dissemination of political, intellectual and cultural ideas and objects has, in recent years, received some scholarly attention. Agents from different professional backgrounds diplomats, scholars, artists, priests, booksellers and merchants have, however, been studied mostly from a single, disciplinary perspective. The chapters making up this present volume all focus on individuals and professional groups who, in the course of their careers, became involved in multiple modes of cultural and political transfer. Together they present an international and interdisciplinary examination of early modern brokerage, a phenomenon which was permeating early modern society and possibly even one of the fundamental organizational principles of that society.Contributors include: Robert Hill, Thomas Kirk, Bianca Chen, Maartje van Gelder, Maurits A. Ebben, Peter Hauge, Susanna Kubersky-Piredda, Salvador Salort Pons, Martin Dönike, Badeloch Vera Noldus, and Marika Keblusek.
Main Description
brokerage; agency; cultural transfer; (informal) diplomacy; early modern Europe; art collections; merchants; artists
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of Figures and Tablesp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
List of Contributorsp. xiii
Introduction: Double Agents in Early Modern Europep. 1
The Embassy of Art: Diplomats as Cultural Brokersp. 11
Art and Patronage: Sir Henry Wotton and the Venetian Embassy 1604-1624p. 27
Giovanni Andrea Doria: Citizen of Genoa, Prince of Melfi, Agent of King Philip II of Spainp. 59
Politics and Letters: Gisbert Cuper as a Servant of Two Republicsp. 71
Mercator Sapiens: Merchants as Cultural Entrepreneursp. 95
Acquiring Artistic Expertise: The Agent Daniel Nijs and His Contacts with Artists in Venicep. 111
García de Yllán: A Merchant in Silver, Bread and Bullets and a Broker in Art, 1591-1655p. 125
The Pretext of Pictures: Artists as Cultural and Political Agentsp. 147
A Spider in Its Web: Agent and Artist Michel le Blon and His Northern European Networkp. 161
John Dowland's Employment at the Royal Danish Court: Musician, Agentùand Spy?p. 193
Travels of a Court Jester: Gonzalo de Liaño, Art Agent at the Court of King Philip II of Spainp. 213
'From Russia with Love': Agents and Their Victimsp. 233
Bibliographyp. 247
Index of Personal Namesp. 269
Index of Placesp. 278
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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