Catalogue


The jar of severed hands : Spanish deportation of Apache prisoners of war, 1770-1810 /
Mark Santiago.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2011.
description
xiv, 258 p.
ISBN
0806141778 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780806141770 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2011.
isbn
0806141778 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780806141770 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
A cruel and bloody war -- Prisoners -- Regulations and instructions -- The confusion of power -- Severed heads and chained necks -- A singular expression of friendship -- An officer disposed for commissions -- Bodily and spiritual necessities -- Reckonings, rescue, and return -- Remove them from where they can be dangerous -- The greatest resistance possible -- The jar of severed hands -- Hard lessons.
catalogue key
7611454
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
More than two centuries after the Coronado Expedition first set foot in the region, the northern frontier of New Spain in the late 1770s was still under attack by Apache raiders. Mark Santiago's gripping account of Spanish efforts to subdue the Apaches illuminates larger cultural and political issues in the colonial period of the Southwest and northern Mexico. To persuade the Apaches to abandon their homelands and accept Christian "civilization," Spanish officials employed both the mailed fist of continuous war and the velvet glove of the reservation system. "Hostiles" captured by the Spanish would be deported, while Apaches who agreed to live in peace near the Spanish presidios would receive support. Santiago's history of the deportation policy includes vivid descriptions of colleras, the chain gangs of Apache prisoners of war bound together for the two-month journey by mule and on foot from the northern frontier to Mexico City. The book's arresting title, The Jar of Severed Hands, comes from a 1792 report documenting a desperate break for freedom made by a group of Apache prisoners. After subduing the prisoners and killing twelve Apache men, the Spanish soldiers verified the attempted breakout by amputating the left hands of the dead and preserving them in a jar for display to their superiors. Santiago's nuanced analysis of deportation policy credits both the Apaches' ability to exploit the Spanish government's dual approach and the growing awareness on the Spaniards' part that the peoples they referred to as Apaches were a disparate and complex assortment of tribes that could not easily be subjugated. The Jar of Severed Handsdeepens our understanding of the dynamics of the relationship between Indian tribes and colonial powers in the Southwest borderlands.
Main Description
Santiagos nuanced analysis of deportation policy credits both the Apaches ability to exploit the Spanish governments dual approach and the growing awareness on the Spaniards part that the peoples they referred to as Apaches were a disparate and complex assortment of tribes that could not easily be subjugated. The Jar of Severed Hands deepens our understanding of the dynamics of the relationship between Indian tribes and colonial powers in the Southwest borderlands.
Main Description
Explores colonial Spanish-Apache relations in the Southwest borderlands More than two centuries after the Coronado Expedition first set foot in the region, the northern frontier of New Spain in the late 1770s was still under attack by Apache raiders. Mark Santiago's gripping account of Spanish efforts to subdue the Apaches illuminates larger cultural and political issues in the colonial period of the Southwest and northern Mexico. To persuade the Apaches to abandon their homelands and accept Christian "civilization," Spanish officials employed both the mailed fist of continuous war and the velvet glove of the reservation system. "Hostiles" captured by the Spanish would be deported, while Apaches who agreed to live in peace near the Spanish presidios would receive support. Santiago's history of the deportation policy includes vivid descriptions of colleras, the chain gangs of Apache prisoners of war bound together for the two-month journey by mule and on foot from the northern frontier to Mexico City. The book's arresting title, The Jar of Severed Hands, comes from a 1792 report documenting a desperate break for freedom made by a group of Apache prisoners. After subduing the prisoners and killing twelve Apache men, the Spanish soldiers verified the attempted breakout by amputating the left hands of the dead and preserving them in a jar for display to their superiors. Santiago's nuanced analysis of deportation policy credits both the Apaches' ability to exploit the Spanish government's dual approach and the growing awareness on the Spaniards' part that the peoples they referred to as Apaches were a disparate and complex assortment of tribes that could not easily be subjugated. The Jar of Severed Handsdeepens our understanding of the dynamics of the relationship between Indian tribes and colonial powers in the Southwest borderlands.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
A Cruel and Bloody Warp. 11
Prisonersp. 28
Regulations and Instructionsp. 43
The Confusion of Powerp. 59
Severed Heads and Chained Necksp. 81
A Singular Expression of Friendshipp. 98
An Officer Disposed for Commissionsp. 110
Bodily and Spiritual Necessitiesp. 120
Reckonings, Rescue, and Returnp. 131
Remove Them from Where They Can Be Dangerousp. 143
The Greatest Resistance Possiblep. 155
The Jar of Severed Handsp. 163
Hard Lessonsp. 175
Epiloguep. 196
Number of Apaches Deportedp. 201
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 231
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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