Catalogue


Fighting their own battles : Mexican Americans, African Americans, and the struggle for civil rights in Texas /
Brian D. Behnken.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
description
xix, 347 p.
ISBN
0807834785 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807834787 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
isbn
0807834785 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807834787 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Advancing the cause of democracy : the origins of protest in the long civil rights movement -- Sleeping on another man's wounds : the battle for integrated schools in the 1950s -- Nothing but victory can stop us : direct action and political action in the early 1960s -- Venceremos : the evolution of civil rights in the mid-1960s -- Am I my brother's keeper? : ecumenical activism in the Lone Star State -- The day of nonviolence is past : the era of Brown power and Black power in Texas -- Pawns, puppets, and ccapegoats : school desegregation in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
catalogue key
7611412
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Behnken explores the cultural dissimilarities, geographical distance, class tensions, and organizational differences that all worked to separate blacks' and Mexican Americans' civil rights struggles in Texas.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Well written, soundly researched, and persuasively argued, Behnken's study is a welcome addition to the history of civil rights in Texas." - American Historical Review
"This compelling and extensively researched book is the first major historical analysis to trace the roots of the generally separate, and often disparate, efforts of African Americans and Mexican Americans for equal rights under the law. Behnken's insightful scholarship makes this a pioneering study in U.S. and Texas history. It should spark debate and, hopefully, shed more light on this complex and significant subject."--Amilcar Shabazz, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
"Behnken has immersed himself in two vast historiographies; his book will be central to studies of black-brown relations for years to come." - Journal of Southern History
"Behnken has produced a valuable and challenging comparative study, essential reading for the post- World War II civil right movement, southern and western history, and whiteness studies." - Southern Spaces
" Fighting Their Own Battles is a solid and much needed approach to the overarching field of Civil Rights Movement literature." - Southern Historian
"A much needed monograph on the history of the African American and Mexican American Civil Rights movements in Texas." - Southwestern Historical Quarterly
"An excellent contribution to the literature on civil rights. . . . It contains many fascinating details regarding the civil rights struggles of both groups." - Journal of American History
"An important resource to include in a variety of course teaching materials, especially courses touching upon the topic of the history of civil rights activism. The book also serves as a useful guide for learning more about the sociology of social movements." - Ethnic and Racial Studies
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Between 1940 and 1975, African Americans and Mexican Americans in Texas fought a number of battles in court, at the ballot box, in schools, and on the streets to eliminate segregation and state-imposed racism. Although both groups engaged in civil rights struggles as victims of similar forms of racism and discrimination, they were rarely unified. InFighting Their Own Battles, Brian Behnken explores the cultural dissimilarities, geographical distance, class tensions, and organizational differences that all worked to separate blacks and Mexican Americans. Behnken further demonstrates that prejudices on both sides undermined the potential for a united civil rights campaign. Coalition building and cooperative civil rights efforts foundered on the rocks of perceived difference, competition, distrust, and, oftentimes, outright racism. Behnken's in-depth study reveals the major issues of contention for the two groups, their different strategies to win rights, and significant thematic developments within the two civil rights struggles. By comparing the histories of these movements in one of the few states in the nation to witness two civil rights movements, Behnken bridges the fields of African American and Mexican American history, revealing the myriad causes that ultimately led these groups to "fight their own battles."
Main Description
Between 1940 and 1975, African Americans and Mexican Americans in Texas fought a number of battles in court, at the ballot box, in schools, and on the streets to eliminate segregation and state-imposed racism. Although both groups engaged in civil rights struggles as victims of similar forms of racism and discrimination, they were rarely unified. In Fighting Their Own Battles , Brian Behnken explores the cultural dissimilarities, geographical distance, class tensions, and organizational differences that all worked to separate blacks and Mexican Americans. Behnken further demonstrates that prejudices on both sides undermined the potential for a united civil rights campaign. Coalition building and cooperative civil rights efforts foundered on the rocks of perceived difference, competition, distrust, and, oftentimes, outright racism. Behnken's in-depth study reveals the major issues of contention for the two groups, their different strategies to win rights, and significant thematic developments within the two civil rights struggles. By comparing the histories of these movements in one of the few states in the nation to witness two civil rights movements, Behnken bridges the fields of African American and Mexican American history, revealing the myriad causes that ultimately led these groups to "fight their own battles."
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work explores the cultural dissimilarities, geographical distance, class tensions, and organizational differences that separated blacks and Mexican Americans. The author demonstrates that prejudices on both sides undermined the potential for a united civil rights campaign.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Acronyms and Abbreviationsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Advancing the Cause of Democracy: The Origins of Protest in the Long Civil Rights Movementp. 13
Sleeping on Another Man's Wounds: The Battle for Integrated Schools in the 1950sp. 39
Nothing but Victory Can Stop Us: Direct Action and Political Action in the Early 1960sp. 72
Venceremos: The Evolution of Civil Rights in the Mid-1960sp. 102
Am I My Brother's Keeper?: Ecumenical Activism in the Lone Star Statep. 130
The Day of Nonviolence Is Past: The Era of Brown Power and Black Power in Texasp. 154
Pawns, Puppets, and Scapegoats: School Desegregation in the Late 1960s and Early 1970sp. 195
Conclusionp. 224
Notesp. 241
Bibliographyp. 305
Indexp. 333
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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