Catalogue

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The won cause : black and white comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic /
Barbara A. Gannon.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
description
xiv, 282 p.
ISBN
0807834521 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807834527 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.
isbn
0807834521 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807834527 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The only association where black men and white men mingle on a foot of equality -- Comradeship tried : the GAR in the South -- The African American post -- The black GAR circle -- Heirs of these dead heroes : African Americans and the battle for memory -- Memorial Day in black and white -- Where separate Grand Army posts are unknown, as colored and white are united : the integrated post -- Community, memory, and the integrated post -- Comrades bound by memories many -- And if spared and growing older -- Liberty and union, now and forever, one and inseparable : what they remembered they won -- The won cause at century's end -- A story of a slaveholding society that became a servant of freedom : the won cause in the twentieth century -- Epilogue: all one that day if never again : the final days of the GAR -- Appendix 1: African American posts -- Appendix 2: Integrated posts.
catalogue key
7608151
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In this thoroughly researched and groundbreaking study, Gannon chronicles black and white veterans' efforts to create and sustain the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)--the Union army's largest veterans' organization and the nation's first interracial organization.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-03-01:
Gannon (military history, Univ. of Central Florida) presents an original and absorbing account of the ways black and white Union veterans of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) created communities of comradeship based on their shared wartime sacrifices for liberty and Union. She shows that GAR veterans persisted in deeming secession treason, slavery a curse, and emancipation the redemption that released the great republic to realize its God-anointed promise to become a world power. Countering current scholarship, Gannon insists that, although Southerners' Lost Cause mythology won the struggles in public memory, Union veterans did not accept the terms of sectional reconciliation that forgot blacks' roles in saving the Union and that celebrated white courage regardless of sides. A compelling corrective to common misconceptions that still posit an abstraction such as states' rights as the cause of secession rather than the concrete fact of slavery. Pertinent and persuasive; highly recommended for Civil War specialists. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2012-01-01:
Gannon (Univ. of Central Florida) offers a controversial interpretation of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), the Union Army's most prominent veterans association. Her central question is why white veterans welcomed black veterans into the GAR at a time when so many US institutions excluded them. Contrary to previous scholarship, the book argues that within the confines of GAR posts, white veterans (many of whom held racist views toward black Americans) embraced black veterans as their political and social equals. Gannon argues that the "won cause"--Union soldiers' victory over slavery and the Confederacy--provided the basis for interracial solidarity in the war's aftermath. Gannon provides compelling evidence that, despite black and white Union soldiers' divergent wartime experiences (namely, segregated fighting units), black and white GAR members created a shared memory of their wartime triumphs and suffering. This book will force readers to reconsider their assumptions about 19th-century race relations. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. K. K. Hill Texas Tech University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A concise and provocative book. . . . [it] will force historians to reconsider many aspects of late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century race relations and to listen more carefully to the voices of the veterans." - Register of The Kentucky Historical Society
"An insightful examination of the ways individual memory and historical fact meld together to create an organization's and a nation's public identity." - Civil War Times
"A welcome addition to the literature on the Civil War, its veterans, and its collective memory in American society between the 1860s and 1920s." - Civil War Book Review
"Barbara Gannon has written a fine piece of scholarship with highly impressive, groundbreaking research. This important study will be a major contribution to the literature on the Civil War."--Donald R. Shaffer, author of After the Glory: The Struggles of Black Civil War Veterans
"Barbara Gannon has written a fine piece of scholarship with highly impressive, groundbreaking research. This important study will be a major contribution to the literature on the Civil War."--Donald R. Shaffer, author ofAfter the Glory: The Struggles of Black Civil War Veterans
"Gannon presents an original and absorbing account . . .countering current scholarship. . . . A compelling corrective to common misconceptions. . . . Pertinent and persuasive; highly recommended for Civil War specialists." - Library Journal
"Gannon's innovative research method, the logical rigor of her argument, and the persuasiveness of her evidence make this an invaluable contribution to the literatures on the Civil War, emancipation, race, and memory." - American Historical Review
"The important corrective administered [in Gannon's book] will change the way we think about the Grand Army of the Republic and race from now on." - Journal of Southern History
" The Won Cause is a unique and important contribution to the slowly growing literature on Civil War veterans and will help inspire historians to take closer looks at the ways that veterans and their communities responded to the decades following the war." - Journal of the Civil War Era
"This book will force readers to reconsider their assumptions about 19th-century race relations. Recommended. All levels/libraries." - Choice
"This important and provocative volume makes. . . valuable contributions to our understanding of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), and particularly the role of African American veterans in that powerful postwar organization. . . . [A] rich and powerful text." - Florida Historical Quarterly
"Uncover[s] the extent of African American participation and integration in the GAR. . . . The Won Cause brings an important new perspective." - The Annals of Iowa
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, March 2011
Choice, January 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this thoroughly researched study, Barbara Gannon chronicles black and white Civil War veteran's efforts to create and sustain the nation's first interracial organization, the Grand Army of the Republic.
Main Description
In the years after the Civil War, black and white Union soldiers who survived the horrific struggle joined the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)--the Union army's largest veterans' organization. In this thoroughly researched and groundbreaking study, Barbara Gannon chronicles black and white veterans' efforts to create and sustain the nation's first interracial organization. According to the conventional view, the freedoms and interests of African American veterans were not defended by white Union veterans after the war, despite the shared tradition of sacrifice among both black and white soldiers. In The Won Cause , however, Gannon challenges this scholarship, arguing that although black veterans still suffered under the contemporary racial mores, the GAR honored its black members in many instances and ascribed them a greater equality than previous studies have shown. Using evidence of integrated posts and veterans' thoughts on their comradeship and the cause, Gannon reveals that white veterans embraced black veterans because their membership in the GAR demonstrated that their wartime suffering created a transcendent bond--comradeship--that overcame even the most pernicious social barrier--race-based separation. By upholding a more inclusive memory of a war fought for liberty as well as union, the GAR's "Won Cause" challenged the Lost Cause version of Civil War memory.
Main Description
In the years after the Civil War, black and white Union soldiers who survived the horrific struggle joined the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)--the Union army's largest veterans' organization. In this thoroughly researched and groundbreaking study, Barbara Gannon chronicles black and white veterans' efforts to create and sustain the nation's first interracial organization. According to the conventional view, the freedoms and interests of African American veterans were not defended by white Union veterans after the war, despite the shared tradition of sacrifice among both black and white soldiers. InThe Won Cause, however, Gannon challenges this scholarship, arguing that although black veterans still suffered under the contemporary racial mores, the GAR honored its black members in many instances and ascribed them a greater equality than previous studies have shown. Using evidence of integrated posts and veterans' thoughts on their comradeship and the cause, Gannon reveals that white veterans embraced black veterans because their membership in the GAR demonstrated that their wartime suffering created a transcendent bond--comradeship--that overcame even the most pernicious social barrier--race-based separation. By upholding a more inclusive memory of a war fought for liberty as well as union, the GAR's "Won Cause" challenged the Lost Cause version of Civil War memory.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The World African Americans Made in the Grand Army of the Republic
The Only Association Where Black Men and White Men Mingle on a Foot of Equalityp. 15
Comradeship Tried: The GAR in the Southp. 28
The African American Postp. 35
The Black GAR Circlep. 47
Heirs of These Dead Heroes: African Americans and the Battle for Memoryp. 57
Memorial Day in Black and Whitep. 72
The World Black and White Veterans Made Together
Where Separate Grand Army Posts Are Unknown, As Colored and White Are United: The Integrated Postp. 85
Community, Memory, and the Integrated Postp. 99
Brothers Ever We Shall Be: Black and White Comradeship in the GAR
Comrades Bound by Memories Manyp. 117
And If Spared and Growing Olderp. 131
The Won Cause: A Meaning for Their Suffering
Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable: What They Remembered They Wonp. 145
The Won Cause at Century's Endp. 163
A Story of a Slaveholding Society that Became a Servant of Freedom: The Won Cause in the Twentieth Centuryp. 178
Epilogue: All One that Day If Never Again: The Final Days of the GARp. 196
African American GAR Postsp. 201
Integrated GAR Postsp. 209
Notesp. 221
Bibliographyp. 253
Indexp. 271
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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