Catalogue


The land at the end of the world : a novel /
António Lobo Antunes ; translated with an introduction by Margaret Jull Costa.
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton, c2011.
description
222 p. : port.
ISBN
0393077764 (hbk.), 9780393077766 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
uniform title
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton, c2011.
isbn
0393077764 (hbk.)
9780393077766 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7607718
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2011-03-14:
Antunes's (What Can I Do When Everything's on Fire?) haunting work entangles the reader in a maelstrom of ghastly wartime impressions, recounted by a young medic during the Angolan struggle for independence during the early 1970s. The narrator is a writer looking back after a period of some years, remembering his bourgeois Lisbon family's pronouncements when he was posted to Angola-"At least doing his military service will make a man of him"-yet recognizing that the horrific, raw experience of caring for the sick and wounded in the squalid harbor town of Luanda, Angola, over two years only created a creature "made up of lascivious despair." The Portuguese imperialist presence in the country is everywhere felt, especially in the sexual exploitation of the Africans, and the narrator toils amid the "gigantic, unbelievable absurdity of the war" at a hospital, patching up the dismembered, blown-apart, and malaria-ridden, drinking heavily, and questioning his own insignificance. He is a person of exquisite education and sensibility, having come of age amid the regime of Antonio de Oliveira Salazar in the 1960s; his fluid, hallucinatory narrative (addressed to a tender lover, "you") meanders through memory, cultural allusions, and visceral sensations to describe a surreal experience that proves devastating and transformative. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-04-15:
The brutal war that the Portuguese waged against their rebellious African colony Angola in the early 1970s turned Portugal's self-image as a bearer of civilization on its head. Now the author of 20 novels, Lobo Antunes (b. 1942) was a medic in Angola between 1971 and 1973, and the horrors of his experience provided the theme of his earliest novels, including this, his second, published in 1979. What readers find here is a confession to a lonely and unnamed lover by the narrator, for whom the bloodshed of the Angolan battlefields has expanded to create an entire world in putrefaction. In Luanda, shimmering shabbily in the African heat and humidity, he courts whores in tawdry cabarets while awaiting passage to the combat zone, where he will bandage amputees, debride wounds, and rotate tourniquets. VERDICT Masterfully constructed as a tapestry of words and metaphors and here presented in a new translation more conscientious than its 1983 predecessor (called South of Nowhere), this is one of the great war novels of our time. [See Prepub Alert, 11/8/10.]-Jack Shreve, Allegany Coll. of Maryland, Cumberland (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Should become definitve… Antunes's great novel, which was first published in 1979, and is set...in Angola, presents very different challenges to the translator: the novelist's broad range of allusions, which Jull Costa tackles… with elaborate use of imagery and metaphor.
Dazzling metaphors and surreal images breathe life into this tragic lament about a war that made brutes of its soldiers. Lobo Antunes crafts a story that often reads like poetry, delivering a message as relevant today as it was 30 years ago.
"Should become definitve... Antunes's great novel, which was first published in 1979, and is set...in Angola, presents very different challenges to the translator: the novelist's broad range of allusions, which Jull Costa tackles... with elaborate use of imagery and metaphor."
This great novel has the rare distinction of now having been translated twice. Margaret Jull Costa's new translation must be considered definitive.
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 2011
Library Journal, April 2011
New York Times Book Review, June 2011
Kirkus Reviews, July 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A Portuguese army medic, haunted by his memories of war in the Angolan bush, describes his experiences to a nameless lover at home in Lisbon. Set against the brutalities & absurdities of the longest colonial conflict of modern times, the medic's confessions form a meditation on war & the nature of love.
Description for Library
Hugely honored abroad-he's won the France Culture, Juan Rulfo, and Jerusalem prizes, aside from prizes in his native Portugal-Lobo Antunes is making a name for himself here among the cognoscenti. This work, freshly transalted by the redoubtable Margaret Jull Costa, features a narrator just back from fighting in Angola who feels compelled to confess all he has seen and done to a nameless lover. Recommend to your smart readers.
Main Description
Considered to be António Lobo Antunes's masterpiece, The Land at the End of the World--now in a new and fully restored translation by acclaimed translator Margaret Jull Costa--recounts the anguished tale of a Portuguese medic haunted by memories of war, who, like the Ancient Mariner, will tell his tale to anyone who listens. In the tradition of William Faulkner and Gabriel García Márquez, Lobo Antunes weaves words into an exhilarating tapestry, imbuing his prose with the grace and resonance of poetry. The narrator, freshly returned to Lisbon after his hellish tour of duty in Angola, confesses the traumas of his memory to a nameless lover. Their evening unfolds like a fever dream, as Lobo Antunes leaps deftly back and forth from descriptions of postdictatorship Portugal to the bizarre and brutal world of life on the front line. The result is both tragic and absurd, and belongs among the great war novels of the modern age.
Main Description
Considered to be António Lobo Antunes's masterpiece, The Land at the End of the World-now in a new and fully restored translation by acclaimed translator Margaret Jull Costa-recounts the anguished tale of a Portuguese medic haunted by memories of war, who, like the Ancient Mariner, will tell his tale to anyone who listens. In the tradition of William Faulkner and Gabriel García Márquez, Lobo Antunes weaves words into an exhilarating tapestry, imbuing his prose with the grace and resonance of poetry. The narrator, freshly returned to Lisbon after his hellish tour of duty in Angola, confesses the traumas of his memory to a nameless lover. Their evening unfolds like a fever dream, as Lobo Antunes leaps deftly back and forth from descriptions of postdictatorship Portugal to the bizarre and brutal world of life on the front line. The result is both tragic and absurd, and belongs among the great war novels of the modern age.
Main Description
Considered to be Ant nio Lobo Antunes's masterpiece, The Land at the End of the World-now in a new and fully restored translation by acclaimed translator Margaret Jull Costa-recounts the anguished tale of a Portuguese medic haunted by memories of war, who, like the Ancient Mariner, will tell his tale to anyone who listens. In the tradition of William Faulkner and Gabriel Garc a M rquez, Lobo Antunes weaves words into an exhilarating tapestry, imbuing his prose with the grace and resonance of poetry. The narrator, freshly returned to Lisbon after his hellish tour of duty in Angola, confesses the traumas of his memory to a nameless lover. Their evening unfolds like a fever dream, as Lobo Antunes leaps deftly back and forth from descriptions of postdictatorship Portugal to the bizarre and brutal world of life on the front line. The result is both tragic and absurd, and belongs among the great war novels of the modern age.
Main Description
Considered to be Ant nio Lobo Antunes's masterpiece, The Land at the End of the World --now in a new and fully restored translation by acclaimed translator Margaret Jull Costa--recounts the anguished tale of a Portuguese medic haunted by memories of war, who, like the Ancient Mariner, will tell his tale to anyone who listens. In the tradition of William Faulkner and Gabriel Garc a M rquez, Lobo Antunes weaves words into an exhilarating tapestry, imbuing his prose with the grace and resonance of poetry. The narrator, freshly returned to Lisbon after his hellish tour of duty in Angola, confesses the traumas of his memory to a nameless lover. Their evening unfolds like a fever dream, as Lobo Antunes leaps deftly back and forth from descriptions of postdictatorship Portugal to the bizarre and brutal world of life on the front line. The result is both tragic and absurd, and belongs among the great war novels of the modern age.

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