Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Women and the practice of medical care in early modern Europe, 1400-1800 /
Leigh Whaley.
imprint
Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
vi, 316 pages.
ISBN
0230282911 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780230282919 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230282911 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780230282919 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
The medieval contribution -- New medical regulations and their impact on female healers -- Early modern notions of women: Contradictory views on women as healers -- Medical treatises and texts written by women and for women -- Female midwives and the medical profession -- The healing care of nurses -- The "Irregular" female healer in early modern Europe: a variety of practitioners -- Motherly medicine: Domestic healers and apothecaries -- The wise-woman as healer: Popular medicine, witchcraft and magic.
catalogue key
7605355
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Leigh Whaley is Professor of European History at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada. Her research interests range from the French Revolution to women, gender and science and medicine. She has published books on Napoleon, the French Revolution and a History of Women in Science. Her most recent publication, 'Clandestine Operations': Odette Sansom and Andre Borrel, Exemplary Agents of the Special Operations Executive, appeared in Les femmes face la guerre, edited by Alison S. Fell.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-12-01:
This work is an ambitious, welcome synthesis of the roles, contributions, and challenges of early modern women healers in France, Spain, Italy, and England. Whaley (Acadia Univ., Canada) also considers the history of attitudes to female healers. The nine chapters are arranged by themes and cover, in order, women healers, including Jews and Arabs, in the medieval period; the professionalization of medicine in the university and the licensing of male healers to the exclusion of women; views from Hippocrates on women as healers, including the works of Saint Augustine of Hippo and Christine de Pizan; treatises, medical receipt books, and almanacs; female midwives and the rise of man-midwifery in the 18th century; religious nursing orders such as the Beguines and Ursulines; irregular female healers; the motivation of charity among upper-class women to heal; household healers and apothecaries; and, finally, wise women and white witches. The majority of Whaley's sources are secondary, as might be expected in a synthetic work, yet she includes fine analysis of primary materials in the endnotes, particularly in the chapter on medical receipt books. Full bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. General collections, upper-division undergraduates and above. L. E. Payne University of Missouri-Kansas City
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Women have engaged in healing from the beginning of history, often within the context of the home. This book studies the role, contributions and challenges faced by women healers in France, Spain, Italy and England.
Description for Bookstore
A study of the role, contributions made, and challenges faced by women healers in Early Modern France, Spain, Italy and England, c.1400-c.1800
Description for Bookstore
A study of the role, contributions made, and challenges faced by women healers in Early Modern France, Spain, Italy and England, c.1400-c.1800
Long Description
Women have been engaged in well-being, care-giving, and healing, often within the context of the home, since earliest times. In this book, Leigh Whaley studies the role, contributions, and challenges faced by women healers in Early Modern Europe, c.1400-1800. With a focus on the countries of France, Spain, Italy and England, she includes the role of medical practice among women in the Jewish and Muslim communities. Providing an introduction to the work performed by various kinds of female medical practitioners, healers and writers, the book also considers the various attitudes towards the woman healer and stresses the importance of gender in the healing arts. The first attempt to provide a scholarly and general overview of women and their relationship to medicine, Whaley brings together a mass of secondary and contemporary literature and sources to go beyond the concept of women's contributions to medicine as being confined to midwifery, nursing, unofficial village healing and domestic medicine. In addition, the book aims to explain why women were, for the most part, excluded from the practice of formal medicine until the final decades of the Nineteenth century as well as exploring what social factors determined that women would not practice medicine, and the strategies women adopted to counter-act the prevailing dominant culture.
Long Description
Women have been engaged in well-being, care-giving, and healing, often within the context of the home, since earliest times. In this book, Leigh Whaley studies the role, contributions, and challenges faced by women healers in Early Modern Europe, c.1400-1800. With a focus on the countries of France, Spain, Italy and England, she includes the role of medical practice among women in the Jewish and Muslim communities.  Providing an introduction to the work performed by various kinds of female medical practitioners, healers and writers, the book also considers the various attitudes towards the woman healer and stresses the importance of gender in the healing arts.   The first attempt to provide a scholarly and general overview of women and their relationship to medicine, Whaley brings together a mass of secondary and contemporary literature and sources to go beyond the concept of women's contributions to medicine as being confined to midwifery, nursing, unofficial village healing and domestic medicine. In addition, the book aims to explain why women were, for the most part, excluded from the practice of formal medicine until the final decades of the Nineteenth century as well as exploring what social factors determined that women would not practice medicine, and the strategies women adopted to counter-act the prevailing dominant culture.
Main Description
Women have engaged in healing from the beginning of history, often within the context of the home. This book studies the role, contributions and challenges faced by women healers in France, Spain, Italy and England, including medical practice among women in the Jewish and Muslim communities, from the later Middle Ages to approximately 1800.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introductionp. 1
The Medieval Contributionp. 7
New Medical Regulations and their Impact on Female Healersp. 26
Early Modern Notions of Women: Contradictory Views on Women as Healersp. 48
Medical Treatises and Texts Written by Women and for Womenp. 68
Female Midwives and the Medical Professionp. 91
The Healing Care of Nursesp. 112
The 'Irregular' Female Healer in Early Modern Europe: A Variety of Practitionersp. 131
Motherly Medicine: Domestic Healers and Apothecariesp. 150
The Wise-Woman as Healer: Popular Medicine, Witchcraft and Magicp. 174
Epiloguep. 196
Notesp. 198
Bibliographyp. 264
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem