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John Donne's performances : sermons, poems, letters and devotions /
Margret Fetzer.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : distributed in the United States exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, c2010.
description
x, 317 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0719083443 (hbk.), 9780719083440 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : distributed in the United States exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, c2010.
isbn
0719083443 (hbk.)
9780719083440 (hbk.)
abstract
This is a comparative reading of Donne's poetry and prose, which eschews questions of personal or religious sincerity in order to recreate an image of John Donne as a man of many performances.
catalogue key
7599869
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [276]-306) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Margret Fetzer is a scholar of English Literature. She has worked as an Assistant Professor at the University of Munich, Germany
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a valuable and original contribution to early modern studies'Syrithe Pugh, Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, 60.4 (2012)
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a comparative reading of Donne's poetry and prose, which eschews questions of personal or religious sincerity in order to recreate an image of John Donne as a man of many performances.
Main Description
Ever since their rediscovery in the 1920s, John Donne's writings have been praised for their energy, vigour and drama - yet so far, no attempt has been made to approach and define systematically these major characteristics of his work.Drawing on J. L. Austin's speech act theory, Margret Fetzer's comparative reading of Donne's poetry and prose eschews questions of personal or religious sincerity and instead recreates an image of John Donne as a man of many performances. No matter if engaged in the writing of a sermon or a piece of erotic poetry, Donne placed enormous trust in what words could do. Questions as to how saying something may actually bring about that very thing, or how playing the part of someone else affects an actor's identity, are central to Donne's oeuvre - and moreover highly relevant in the cultural and theological contexts of the early modern period in general. In treating both canonical and lesser known Donne texts, John Donne's Performances hopes to make a significant contribution not only to Donne criticism and research into early modern culture: by using concepts of performance and performativity as its major theoretical backdrop, it aims to establish an interdisciplinary link with the field of performance studies.
Main Description
Ever since their rediscovery in the 1920s, John Donne's writings have been praised for their energy, vigour and drama -- yet so far, no attempt has been made to approach and define systematically these major characteristics of his work. Drawing on J. L. Austin's speech act theory, Margret Fetzer's comparative reading of Donne's poetry and prose eschews questions of personal or religious sincerity and instead recreates an image of John Donne as a man of many performances. No matter if engaged in the writing of a sermon or a piece of erotic poetry, Donne placed enormous trust in what words could do. Questions as to how saying something may actually bring about that very thing, or how playing the part of someone else affects an actor's identity, are central to Donne's oeuvre -- and moreover highly relevant in the cultural and theological contexts of the early modern period in general. In treating both canonical and lesser known Donne texts, John Donne's Performances hopes to make a significant contribution not only to Donne criticism and research into early modern culture: by using concepts of performance and performativity as its major theoretical backdrop, it aims to establish an interdisciplinary link with the field of performance studies.
Main Description
Ever Since Their Rediscovery in the 1920s, John Donne's writings have been praised for their energy, vigour and drama - yet so far, no attempt has been made to approach and define systematically these major characteristics of his work. Drawing on J. L. Austin's speech act theory, Margret Fetzer's comparative reading of Donne's poetry and prose eschews questions of personal or religious sincerity and instead recreates an image of John Donne as a man of many performances. No matter if engaged in the writing of a sermon or a piece of erotic poetry, Donne placed enormous trust in what words could do. Questions as to how saying something may actually bring about that very thing, or how playing the part of someone else affects an actor's identity, are central to Donne's oeuvre - and moreover highly relevant in the cultural and theological contexts of the early modern period in general. Rather than his particular political or religious allegiances, Donne's preoccupation with linguistic performativity and theatrical effect is responsible for the dialogically involved nature of his sermons, the provocations of his worldly and divine poems, the aggressive patronage-seeking of his letters and the interpersonal engagement of his Devotions. In treating both canonical and lesser known Donne texts, John Donne's Performances hopes to make a significant contribution not only to Donne criticism and research into early modern culture: by using concepts of performance and performativity as its major theoretical backdrop, it aims to establish an interdisciplinary link with the field of performance studies. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introduction - Beginning Donnep. 1
Pulpit performances - Sermonsp. 25
Promethean and protean performances - Worldly poemsp. 77
Passionate performances - Poems erotic and divinep. 138
Patronage performances - Lettersp. 185
(Inter)Personal performances - Devotionsp. 225
Conclusion - Being Don(n)ep. 271
Bibliographyp. 276
Indexp. 307
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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