Catalogue


Three Fires unity : the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron borderlands /
Phil Bellfy.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2011.
description
xxxvii, 203 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803213484 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803213487 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2011.
isbn
0803213484 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803213487 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
A historical accounting of the Anishnaabeg people -- The French period : the 1600s to 1763 -- The British period : 1763 to 1795 -- The United States and the division of the Anishnaabeg homeland -- Anishnaabeg treaty-making and the removal period -- Twenty-first century conditions, and conclusion -- Appendix.
general note
"Portions of this manuscript originally appeared in Lines drawn upon the water : First Nations and the Great Lakes borders and borderlands, edited by Karl S. Hele (Waterloo, Ontario : Wilfred Laurier University Press, 2008)"--T.p. verso.
"Winner of the 2010 North American Indian Prose Award."
catalogue key
7461196
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-192) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
Bellfy (American Indian studies; writing, rhetoric, and American cultures, Michigan State Univ.) has added valuable research data to the growing body of literature on tribes whose homelands cross modern international boundaries. He provides a short history of the Anishnaabeg in the Lake Huron borderlands; the Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa tribes, also known as the "Three Council Fires." His thesis is that leaders of these tribes did not accept the Canadian-US dividing line during treaty negotiations in the 19th century. Despite efforts by Canada and the US to forestall such actions, leaders freely moved back and forth across borders and even signed treaties that emphasized their single nationhood as Anishnaabeg (the original people). Twentieth-century pressures have challenged their unity politically, but the tribes have clung tenaciously to their sense of cultural unity. A valuable appendix that provides lists of which treaties were signed by which leaders in both the US and Canada enhances the textual analysis of cross-border unity. This work complements recent studies by Cary Miller (Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845, CH, Aug'11, 48-7111) and Edmund Danziger (Great Lakes Indian Accommodation and Resistance during the Early Reservation Years, 1850-1900, CH, Mar'10, 47-4003), particularly. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. G. Gagnon University of North Dakota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Three Fires Unity' provides a comprehensive history of the Anishnaabeg people of the Lake Huron borderlands between the United States and Canada.
Main Description
The Lake Huron area of the Upper Great Lakes region, an area spreading across vast parts of the United States and Canada, has been inhabited by the Anishnaabeg for millennia. Since their first contact with Europeans around 1600, the Anishnaabeg have interacted with--and struggled against--changing and shifting European empires and the emerging nation-states that have replaced them. Through their cultural strength, diplomatic acumen, and a remarkable knack for adapting to change, the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron Borderlands have reemerged as a strong and vital people, fully in charge of their destiny in the twenty-first century. Winner of the North American Indian Prose Award, this first comprehensive cross-border history of the Anishnaabeg provides an engaging account of four hundred years of their life in the Lake Huron area, showing how they have been affected by European contact and trade. Three Fires Unity examines how shifting European politics and, later, the imposition of the Canada-United States border running through their homeland, affected them and continues to do so today. In looking at the cultural, social, and political aspects of this borderland contact, Phil Bellfy sheds light on how the Anishnaabeg were able to survive and even thrive over the centuries in this intensely contested region.
Main Description
The Lake Huron area of the Upper Great Lakes region, an area spreading across vast parts of the United States and Canada, has been inhabited by the Anishnaabeg for millennia. Since their first contact with Europeans around 1600, the Anishnaabeg have interacted with--and struggled against--changing and shifting European empires and the emerging nation-states that have replaced them. Through their cultural strength, diplomatic acumen, and a remarkable knack for adapting to change, the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron Borderlands have reemerged as a strong and vital people, fully in charge of their destiny in the twenty-first century. Winner of the North American Indian Prose Award, this first comprehensive cross-border history of the Anishnaabeg provides an engaging account of four hundred years of their life in the Lake Huron area, showing how they have been affected by European contact and trade.Three Fires Unityexamines how shifting European politics and, later, the imposition of the Canada-United States border running through their homeland affected them and continues to do so today. In looking at the cultural, social, and political aspects of this borderland contact, Phil Bellfy sheds light on how the Anishnaabeg were able to survive and even thrive over the centuries in this intensely contested region.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. xv
A Historical Accounting of the Anishnaabeg Peoplep. 1
The French Period: The 1600s to 1763p. 17
The British Period: 1763 to 1795p. 37
The United States and the Division of the Anishnaabeg Homelandp. 53
Anishnaabeg Treaty-Making and the Removal Periodp. 83
Twenty-First-Century Conditions, and Conclusionp. 131
Appendixp. 151
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 177
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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