Catalogue


Forty miles from the sea : Xalapa, the public sphere, and the Atlantic world in nineteenth-century Mexico /
Rachel A. Moore.
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.
description
xiii, 230 p.
ISBN
0816529337 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780816529339 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.
isbn
0816529337 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780816529339 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7459539
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Forty Miles from the Sea is a rare book that explores the symbiotic yet conflicted relationship that bound Mexican cities like Xalpa to the larger Atlantic world and considers the impact that these affiliations had on communication, and ultimately, the formation of national identity.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"I can think of no other history that approaches the problem of regional identities in such an innovative way. I believe that it will make a valuable addition to the literature and will serve as a point of departure for similar works in the future." Michael Ducey, author of A Nation of Villages: Riot and Rebellion in the Mexican Huasteca
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, October 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
While the literature on Atlantic history is vast and flourishing, few studies have examined the importance of inland settlements to the survival of Atlantic ports. This book explores the symbiotic yet conflicted relationships that bound the Mexican cities of Xalapa and Veracruz to the larger Atlantic world and considers the impact these affiliations had on communication and, ultimately, the formation of national identity. Over the course of the nineteenth century, despite its inland location, Xalapa became an important Atlantic community as it came to represent both a haven and a place of fortification for residents of Veracruz. Yellow fever, foreign invasion, and domestic discord drove thousands of residents of Veracruz, as well as foreign travelers, to seek refuge in Xalapa. At the same time, these adverse circumstances prompted the Mexican government to use Xalapa as a bulwark against threats originating in the Atlantic. The influence of the Atlantic world thus stretched far into central Mexico, thanks to both the instability of the coastal region and the desire of government officials to “protect" central Mexico from volatile Atlantic imports. The boundaries established at Xalapa, however, encouraged goods, information, and people to collect in the city and thereby immerse the population in the developments of the Atlantic sphere. Thus, in seeking to protect the center of the country, government authorities more firmly situated Xalapa in the Atlantic world. This connection would be trumped by national affiliation only when native residents of Xalapa became more comfortable with their participation in the Mexican public sphere later in the nineteenth century. The interdisciplinary and comparative nature of this study will make it appeal to those studying Atlantic history, including historians of Britain, the United States, Latin America, and Africa, as well as those studying communication, print culture, and postal history more broadly.
Main Description
While the literature on Atlantic history is vast and flourishing, few studies have examined the importance of inland settlements to the survival of Atlantic ports. This book explores the symbiotic yet conflicted relationships that bound the Mexican cities of Xalapa and Veracruz to the larger Atlantic world and considers the impact these affiliations had on communication and, ultimately, the formation of national identity. Over the course of the nineteenth century, despite its inland location, Xalapa became an important Atlantic community as it came to represent both a haven and a place of fortification for residents of Veracruz. Yellow fever, foreign invasion, and domestic discord drove thousands of residents of Veracruz, as well as foreign travelers, to seek refuge in Xalapa. At the same time, these adverse circumstances prompted the Mexican government to use Xalapa as a bulwark against threats originating in the Atlantic. The influence of the Atlantic world thus stretched far into central Mexico, thanks to both the instability of the coastal region and the desire of government officials to "protect" central Mexico from volatile Atlantic imports. The boundaries established at Xalapa, however, encouraged goods, information, and people to collect in the city and thereby immerse the population in the developments of the Atlantic sphere. Thus, in seeking to protect the center of the country, government authorities more firmly situated Xalapa in the Atlantic world. This connection would be trumped by national affiliation only when native residents of Xalapa became more comfortable with their participation in the Mexican public sphere later in the nineteenth century. The interdisciplinary and comparative nature of this study will make it appeal to those studying Atlantic history, including historians of Britain, the United States, Latin America, and Africa, as well as those studying communication, print culture, and postal history more broadly.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Caustic Remedies: Commerce and Contagion in Xalapa and Veracruz, 1790-1810p. 27
Policing the Paper Frontier: Monitoring the Quotidian Coastline in Xalapa, 1812-1825p. 55
A New Point of Departure: Orizaba, Xalapa, and Transport Rivalries in the Veracruz Corridor, 1812-1842p. 78
Coastal Caudillo: Absence and Presence in the Public Sphere of Atlantic Mexicop. 101
A Parochial City Joins the Public Sphere: From the Pulpit to the Post in Orizaba, 1812-1867p. 143
Conclusionp. 163
Notesp. 169
Bibliographyp. 207
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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