Catalogue


Narrative psychiatry : how stories can shape clinical practice /
Bradley Lewis.
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.
description
xvi, 214 p.
ISBN
0801899028 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780801899027 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.
isbn
0801899028 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780801899027 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Listening to Chekhov -- Narrative medicine -- Narrative approaches to psychotherapy -- Narrative psychiatry -- Ms. Dutta and the literary case -- Mainstream stories I : biopsychiatry, cognitive behavioral therapy, and psychoanalysis -- Mainstream stories II : interpersonal therapy, family therapy, and humanistic therapy -- Alternative stories : spiritual therapy, expressive therapy, and cultural, political, and feminist therapies -- Doing narrative psychiatry -- Critical reflections.
catalogue key
7459385
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-10-01:
The approach known as narrative medicine arose in response to the belief that medicine had begun to focus too exclusively on the biological mechanics of disease, ignoring how patients' race, class, religion, and life history shape their experiences of illness. Rita Charon's Narrative Medicine (2006) is now the standard introduction to the approach. In this book, Lewis (New York Univ.), author of Moving beyond Prozac, DSM, and the New Psychiatry (CH, Oct'06, 44-0956), explores how psychiatrists can use the principles of narrative medicine when working with patients suffering from mental health problems, shifting psychiatry away from the biological paradigm that sees mental illness as caused simply by faulty brain chemistry. Lewis illuminates the approach by using a fictional narrative about an Indian woman's transition to life in the US. He walks readers through how various psychiatric treatment modalities would approach the problem of the story's protagonists, before discussing how narrative techniques might challenge or complement other approaches. This volume would be a helpful teaching tool for clinicians who want to think carefully about how various approaches might shape their favorite clinical paradigms. It will be most useful for mental health practitioners and others who are familiar with the psychology. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students through professionals/practitioners. A. W. Klink Duke University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This fascinating book throws new light on the potential of psychiatry to help patients navigate today's complex world. Lewis offers practical and effective ways to incorporate therapies that -- while not denying the merits of pharmaceutical remedies -- can draw on the immense benefits of helping patients build narrative accounts of their lives.
Like language, we may need to be reminded of the unobstrusive infrastructure on which stories are built. For this reason alone, Lewis's book is very much welcome.
Narrative Psychiatry is an important book, offering critical insights to both clinicians and to humanities scholars as to how their world views, their knowledge, and their methods work together to "open the door" to a more nuanced practice of psychiatry.
This volume would be a helpful teaching tool for clinicians who want to think carefully about how various approaches might shape their favorite clinical paradigms.
Lewis achieves a dazzling unity of the sciences, the stories, and the craft of the human search not only for health but for meaning. What a doctor he must be, to face the suffering, to recognize the one who suffers, to bring to bear on that suffering a bounty of knowledge within a wealth of frames. This book not only opens doors for a discipline; it speaks to all of us of freedom.
Lewis has captured and articulated a method of working with patients that is at once intuitive to seasoned practitioners, while also directing them to novel areas of thinking about and working with patients.
"Lewis has captured and articulated a method of working with patients that is at once intuitive to seasoned practitioners, while also directing them to novel areas of thinking about and working with patients." -- John Z. Sadler, M.D., author of Values and Psychiatric Diagnosis
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Psychiatry has lagged behind many clinical specialties in recognizing the importance of narrative for understanding and effectively treating disease. With this book, Bradley Lewis makes the challenging and compelling case that psychiatrists need to promote the significance of narrative in their practice as well.Narrative already holds a prominent place in psychiatry. Patient stories are the foundation for diagnosis and the key to managing treatment and measuring its effectiveness. Even so, psychiatry has paid scant scholarly attention to the intrinsic value of patient stories. Fortunately, the study of narrative outside psychiatry has grown exponentially in recent years, and it is now possible for psychiatry to make considerable advances in its appreciation of clinical stories. Narrative Psychiatry picks up this intellectual opportunity and develops the tools of narrative for psychiatry. Lewis explores the rise of narrative medicine and looks closely at recent narrative approaches to psychotherapy. He uses philosophic and fictional writings, such as Anton Chekhov's play Ivanov, to develop key terms in narrative theory (plot, metaphor, character, point of view) and to understand the interpretive dimensions of clinical work. Finally, Lewis brings this material back to psychiatric practice, showing how narrative insights can be applied in psychiatric treatments -- including the use of psychiatric medications.Nothing short of a call to rework the psychiatric profession, Narrative Psychiatry advocates taking the inherently narrative-centered patient-psychiatrist relationship to its logical conclusion: making the story a central aspect of treatment.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume throws light on the potential of psychiatry to help patients navigate today's complex world. Lewis offers practical and effective ways to incorporate therapies that can draw on the immense benefits of helping patients build narrative accounts of their lives.
Main Description
Psychiatry has lagged behind many clinical specialties in recognizing the importance of narrative for understanding and effectively treating disease. With this book, Bradley Lewis makes the challenging and compelling case that psychiatrists need to promote the significance of narrative in their practice as well. Narrative already holds a prominent place in psychiatry. Patient stories are the foundation for diagnosis and the key to managing treatment and measuring its effectiveness. Even so, psychiatry has paid scant scholarly attention to the intrinsic value of patient stories. Fortunately, the study of narrative outside psychiatry has grown exponentially in recent years, and it is now possible for psychiatry to make considerable advances in its appreciation of clinical stories. Narrative Psychiatry picks up this intellectual opportunity and develops the tools of narrative for psychiatry. Lewis explores the rise of narrative medicine and looks closely at recent narrative approaches to psychotherapy. He uses philosophic and fictional writings, such as Anton Chekhov's play Ivanov, to develop key terms in narrative theory (plot, metaphor, character, point of view) and to understand the interpretive dimensions of clinical work. Finally, Lewis brings this material back to psychiatric practice, showing how narrative insights can be applied in psychiatric treatments -- including the use of psychiatric medications. Nothing short of a call to rework the psychiatric profession, Narrative Psychiatry advocates taking the inherently narrative-centered patient-psychiatrist relationship to its logical conclusion: making the story a central aspect of treatment.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Listening to Chekhovp. 1
Narrative Medicinep. 18
Narrative Approaches to Psychotherapyp. 32
Narrative Psychiatryp. 57
Mrs. Dutta and the Literary Casep. 75
Mainstream Stories I: Biopsychiatry, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Psychoanalysisp. 86
Mainstream Stories II: Interpersonal Therapy, Family Therapy, and Humanistic Therapyp. 104
Alternative Stories: Spiritual Therapy, Expressive Therapy, and Cultural, Political, and Feminist Therapiesp. 121
Doing Narrative Psychiatryp. 144
Critical Reflectionsp. 157
Appendix: ôMrs. Dutta Writes a Letter,öp. 173
Notesp. 189
Referencesp. 197
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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