Catalogue


Writing against, alongside and beyond memory : lifewriting as reflexive, poststructuralist feminist research practice /
Marilyn Metta.
imprint
Bern ; New York : Peter Lang, c2010.
description
312 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
303430515X, 9783034305150
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bern ; New York : Peter Lang, c2010.
isbn
303430515X
9783034305150
catalogue key
7451957
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
Marilyn Metta is a feminist academic in the School of Social Sciences and Asian Languages at Curtin University of Technology and the School of Psychology and Social Sciences at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia. She is a practising psychotherapist at the West Leederville Counselling Centre in Perth.
First Chapter
Memory, embedded in our scripts of the past, inscribed in our bodies and reflected in the collective memory of every family, group and community, occupies one of the most controversial and contested sites over what constitutes legitimate knowledge-making. Using a reflexive feminist research methodology, the author is involved with memory-work in creating three life narratives written in different narrative styles: her mother's and father's biographies and her own autobiography/autoethnography. By exploring the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and culture in the social and cultural constructions of identities in lifewriting, this book maps the underlying politics of storytelling and storymaking, and investigates the political, social, pedagogical and therapeutic implications of writing personal life narratives for feminist scholarship, research and practice. As a Chinese-Australian woman engaging in reflexive, creative and imaginative lifewriting, the author hopes to create new spaces and add new voices to the small but emerging Asian Australian scholarly literature.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Memory, embedded in our scripts of the past, inscribed in our bodies and reflected in the collective memory of every family, group and community, occupies one of the most controversial and contested sites over what constitutes legitimate knowledge-making.
Main Description
Memory, embedded in our scripts of the past, inscribed in our bodies and reflected in the collective memory of every family, group and community, occupies one of the most controversial and contested sites over what constitutes legitimate knowledge-making. Using a reflexive feminist research methodology, the author is involved with memorywork in creating three life narratives written in different narrative styles: her mother's and father's biographies and her own autobiography/ autoethnography. By exploring the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and culture in the social and cultural constructions of identities in lifewriting, this book maps the underlying politics of storytelling and storymaking, and investigates the political, social, pedagogical and therapeutic implications of writing personal life narratives for feminist scholarship, research and practice. As a Chinese-Australian woman engaging in reflexive, creative and imaginative lifewriting, the author hopes to create new spaces and add new voices to the small but emerging Asian Australian scholarly literature.

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