Catalogue


Makers of modern India /
edited by Ramachandra Guha.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011.
description
xi, 500 p.
ISBN
9780674052468 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011.
isbn
9780674052468 (alk. paper)
contents note
The first liberal : Rammohun Roy -- The Muslim modernist : Syed Ahmad Khan -- The agrarian radical : Jotirau Phule -- The liberal reformer : G. K. Gokhale -- The militant nationalist : B. G. Tilak -- The subaltern feminist : Tarabai Shinde -- The multiple agendas of M. K. Gandhi -- The rooted cosmopolitan : Rabindranath Tagore -- The annihilator of caste : B. R. Ambedkar -- The Muslim separatist : M. A. Jinnah -- The radical reformer : E. V. Ramaswamy -- The socialist feminist : Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay -- The renewed agendas of M. K. Gandhi -- The wise democrat : B. R. Ambedkar -- The multiple agendas of Jawaharlal Nehru -- The Hindu supremacist : M. S. Golwalkar -- The indigenous socialist : Rammanohar Lohia -- The grassroots socialist : Jayaprakash Narayan -- The Gandhian liberal : C. Rajagopalachari -- The defender of the triblas : Verrier Elwin -- The last modernist : Hamid Dalwai -- Epilogue : India in the world.
catalogue key
7413874
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-03-15:
Historian Guha (India After Gandhi) writes in his prolog that "the men and women who made [India's] history also write most authoritatively about it." This anthology contains excerpts from writings and speeches spanning nearly two centuries by 19 reformers, radicals, political thinkers, activists, and feminists. The book's chronologically arranged reprinted pieces are divided into five groupings starting with reformer Rammohan Roy, who advocated greater rights for women and a free press in 1818, and extending to selections from Muslim Politics in India (1968) by Hamid Dalwai, an obscure Muslim from the state of Maharashtra. In between are selections ranging from the writings of Mohandas Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, and Rabindranath Tagore to internationally lesser-known politicians such as Ram Manohar Lohia, feminists such as Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay and Tarabai Shinde, and tribal anthropologist and advocate Verrier Elwin. All selections were either originally written in English or previously translated into English. The editor's introductory notes are a bonus. VERDICT This is recommended to relevant research collections and readers studying South Asia's history.-Ravi Shenoy, Naperville P.L., IL (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2011-02-28:
"The striking thing about modern India is that the men and women who made its history also wrote most authoritatively about it." So begins one of the first major anthologies of Indian political writing, impressively annotated by Guha (India After Gandhi). The book recovers and elucidates obscure political writings that "had a defining impact on the formation of the Indian Republic" and demonstrate the diversity of India. A variety of rhetorical styles adds to the complexity and liveliness of the collection: Syed Ahmad Kahn's blunt political rhetoric on Muslim separatism abuts Rammohan Roy's elegant articulations on gender inequality. Though providing a wide gamut of political, religious, and regional writings, the collection is marred by a paucity of female voices-only two women are included. An indulgent focus on Gandhi is punctuated by welcome excerpts by other gifted writers: Jayaprakash Narayan and his incisive critique of Indian political apathy toward Tibet in the earlier stages of Chinese annexation, and Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay's excerpt on communalism and the class underpinnings of partition. Despite the vastness of the material and the limitations imposed by its structure (organized by individual not by theme or chronology), the book is an engaging and illuminating read, and brings to the fore both the diversity of India and the relevance of its modern political origins. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Choice on 2011-09-01:
Well-known historian Guha, the author of India after Gandhi (CH, Jun'08, 45-5732), has published an excellent scholarly book on the writings of 19 extraordinary Indian activists and thinkers, including "father of the nation" M. K. Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Rabindranath Tagore, Syed Ahmad Khan, B. R. Ambedkar, and Ram Mohan Roy. The volume is organized into five parts with a thought-provoking introduction for each. A major anthology of the essays, letters, and speeches of these great thinkers and doers, this edited volume discusses these individuals' views on many aspects of modern India, including democracy, religion, nationalism, language, and development. India is a diverse nation with many languages, religions, cultures, and people. As a very successful democracy, it also serves as a 21st-century role model for many countries. This volume includes a "further reading" essay for each of its parts. A book-related blog is available at . Makers of Modern India will be a valuable resource for all who seek to understand modern India. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic libraries; upper-level undergraduates and above. R. N. Sharma Monmouth University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Guha has produced a pioneering anthology that provides an indispensable introduction to the rich diversity of Indian political argument and a testament to the intellectual ferment out of which India emerged. While interest in the contours of India's democracy grows, there is little high-quality material available on the political traditions that have constituted it. Makers of Modern India admirably fills this gap and goes further, offering a map of modern Indian political debate.
A highly readable volume...[A] perfect bedside book.
[A]n extremely readable and accessible collection.
[A] stimulating work...Incisive and informative.
A treasure for every thinking Indian and for the world which is increasingly curious about this country and its people.
Guha's prose is compelling. He has collected the writings and speeches of a range of influential personalities in the struggle to free India from its colonial yoke and set it on a new path as a modern nation. His introductory remarks are short, informative and enlightening without being intrusive or overwhelming. The result is a skillfully edited collection that will serve as an erudite introduction to the foundations of modern India.
India has been fortunate in the abundance of thinkers who wrote extensively, and often evocatively, on the fundamental issues raised by the task of forging a modern nation from a severely fragmented and backward colony. Guha presents well-chosen excerpts, expertly contextualized by insightful introductions, from the writings and speeches of nineteen such thinker-activists who reflected, often in conflict with each other, on the critical dilemmas of their time: colonialism, religion, language, caste and Untouchability, the status of women, grass-roots governance, electoral systems, regional discord and India's engagement with the world... Makers of Modern India is not meant to be closed-ended, but it effectively brings together the great arguers, fiercely independent in thought and action, from whose disputatious but educated debate emerged the political traditions and compromises that underpin India's complex reality.
In Makers of Modern India , the first major anthology of Indian social and political thought, Ramachandra Guha, an established historian, brings together writings and speeches from 19 key political figures of the 19th and 20th centuries to highlight the range and diversity of ideas about the forming nation... Makers of Modern India begins with an extensive introduction and includes biographical sketches of each figure and guides for further reading. Guha is a learned historian whose writing and subject matter do not fail to captivate.
One of the aims of the book, as Guha points out, is to "make the Indian experience more central to global debates." Another is to acquaint Indians with the rich political tradition of their comparative recent past. Makers of Modern India does both of these very well.
One of the first major anthologies of Indian political writing, impressively annotated by Guha. The book recovers and elucidates obscure political writings that "had a defining impact on the formation of the Indian Republic" and demonstrate the diversity of India. A variety of rhetorical styles adds to the complexity and liveliness of the collection: Syed Ahmad Kahn's blunt political rhetoric on Muslim separatism abuts Rammohan Roy's elegant articulations on gender inequality...An engaging and illuminating read, and brings to the fore both the diversity of India and the relevance of its modern political origins.
Makers of Modern India will be a valuable resource for all who seek to understand modern India.
Readers in the west will find some familiar personalities here, including Gandhi himself, Jawaharlal Nehru, India's secular and liberal-minded first prime minister, and Rabindranath Tagore, the Bengali poet and Nobel laureate. But they will also encounter much less well-known and equally distinguished figures, such as BR Ambedkar, the articulate spokesman of formerly untouchable Hindus, or Dalits, and the main architect of India's extraordinary constitution that in 1949 bestowed equal rights upon all its citizens. As an anthology of Indian political debates, Makers of Modern India makes for instructive reading.
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, February 2011
Library Journal, March 2011
The Australian, June 2011
Choice, September 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Includes a short biographical introduction to each person, followed by excerpts from their writings.
Main Description
Modern India is the world's largest democracy, a sprawling, polyglot nation containing one-sixth of all humankind. The existence of such a complex and distinctive democratic regime qualifies as one of the world's bona fide political miracles. Furthermore, India's leading political thinkers have often served as its most influential political actors-think of Gandhi, whose collected works run to more than ninety volumes, or Ambedkar, or Nehru, who recorded their most eloquent theoretical reflections at the same time as they strove to set the delicate machinery of Indian democracy on a coherent and just path.Out of the speeches and writings of these thinker-activists, Ramachandra Guha has built the first major anthology of Indian social and political thought. Makers of Modern India collects the work of nineteen of India's foremost generators of political sentiment, from those whose names command instant global recognition to pioneering subaltern and feminist thinkers whose works have until now remained obscure and inaccessible. Ranging across manifold languages and cultures, and addressing every crucial theme of modern Indian history-race, religion, language, caste, gender, colonialism, nationalism, economic development, violence, and nonviolence-Makers of Modern India provides an invaluable roadmap to Indian political debate.An extensive introduction, biographical sketches of each figure, and guides to further reading make this work a rich resource for anyone interested in India and the ways its leading political minds have grappled with the problems that have increasingly come to define the modern world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Modern India is the world's largest democracy, a sprawling, polyglot nation containing one-sixth of all humankind. Here, Guha presents an anthology of Indian social and political thought.
Main Description
Modern India is the world's largest democracy, a sprawling, polyglot nation containing one-sixth of all humankind. The existence of such a complex and distinctive democratic regime qualifies as one of the world's bona fide political miracles. Furthermore, India's leading political thinkers have often served as its most influential political actors-think of Gandhi, whose collected works run to more than ninety volumes, or Ambedkar, or Nehru, who recorded their most eloquent theoretical reflections at the same time as they strove to set the delicate machinery of Indian democracy on a coherent and just path. Out of the speeches and writings of these thinker-activists, Ramachandra Guha has built the first major anthology of Indian social and political thought. Makers of Modern India collects the work of nineteen of India's foremost generators of political sentiment, from those whose names command instant global recognition to pioneering subaltern and feminist thinkers whose works have until now remained obscure and inaccessible. Ranging across manifold languages and cultures, and addressing every crucial theme of modern Indian history-race, religion, language, caste, gender, colonialism, nationalism, economic development, violence, and nonviolence- Makers of Modern India provides an invaluable roadmap to Indian political debate. An extensive introduction, biographical sketches of each figure, and guides to further reading make this work a rich resource for anyone interested in India and the ways its leading political minds have grappled with the problems that have increasingly come to define the modern world.

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