Catalogue


Extinction and radiation : how the fall of dinosaurs led to the rise of mammals /
J. David Archibald.
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.
description
x, 108 p. : ill.
ISBN
0801898056 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780801898051 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.
isbn
0801898056 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780801898051 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
The late Cretaceous nonavian dinosaur record -- In the shadow of nonavian dinosaurs -- In search of our most ancient eutherian ancestors -- Patterns of extinction at the K/T boundary -- Causes of extinction at the K/T boundary -- After the impact : modern mammals, when and whence.
catalogue key
7408010
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-07-01:
The mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous about 66 million years ago is arguably one of the most significant events in Earth's history. If nonavian dinosaurs had not gone extinct, then people would not be reading or writing about this event, as Stephen J. Gould often noted. In the ten million years after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary, there was a rapid radiation of mammals into the many forms known today. These two topics, both the extinction of nonavian dinosaurs and subsequent radiation of mammals, are the focus of this fascinating book. Archibald (San Diego State), an expert on fossil mammals from the Cretaceous and early Tertiary, addresses both the patterns and causes of extinction at the K/T boundary. He argues against the single-cause extraterrestrial impact hypothesis, instead favoring multiple causes, including impact, volcanism, and sea level and climate change. The book includes six chapters that cover the fossil record of nonavian dinosaurs, Mesozoic mammals, and eutherian (placental) mammals; patterns and causes of extinction at the K/T boundary; and the origin and radiation of modern mammals after the extinction event. The illustrations are mostly black-and-white drawings, which vary widely in quality. Extensive notes supplement the text. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through professionals in paleontology. E. J. Sargis Yale University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This is a learned essay, written clearly and attractively for students and the public.
This is an excellent compendium of the current state of paleontological knowledge about the contemporaneous histories of these two groups.
What makes Archibald's book a highly recommendable example of the scientific process is that the author carefully lays out all the paleontological evidence available to him and uses that evidence to evaluate the many possible explanations of the extinction, discussing the strengths, weaknesses, and limitations of each explanation in the process.
David Archibald is one of the most knowledgeable people in the world about extinctions, as well as the fairest analyst of their patterns and causes. In this book he invites his readers to consider not just dinosaurs but all the animals that lived at the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. He provides the clearest picture yet of this extremely complex time in the history of life. Anyone interested in paleontology or extinction, especially those who think they already know what did in the dinosaurs, should read this book.
"David Archibald is one of the most knowledgeable people in the world about extinctions, as well as the fairest analyst of their patterns and causes. In this book he invites his readers to consider not just dinosaurs but all the animals that lived at the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. He provides the clearest picture yet of this extremely complex time in the history of life. Anyone interested in paleontology or extinction, especially those who think they already know what did in the dinosaurs, should read this book." -- Kevin Padian, University of California, Berkeley
A highly recommendable example of the scientific process is that the author carefully lays out all the paleontological evidence available to him and uses that evidence to evaluate the many possible explanations of the extinction.
A learned essay, written clearly and attractively for students and the public.
An excellent compendium of the current state of paleontological knowledge about the contemporaneous histories of these two groups.
Highly recommended.
The book itself is a handsome quarto volume illustrated by good drawings and graphs. It will be most useful to paleontologists, evolutionary biologists and biogeographers. It will stand as a good example of what can be accomplished in academia.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
In the geological blink of an eye, mammals moved from an obscure group of vertebrates into a class of planetary dominance. Why? J. David Archibald's provocative study identifies the fall of dinosaurs as the factor that allowed mammals to evolve into the dominant tetrapod form.Archibald refutes the widely accepted single-cause impact theory for dinosaur extinction. He demonstrates that multiple factors -- massive volcanic eruptions, loss of shallow seas, and extraterrestrial impact -- likely led to their demise. While their avian relatives ultimately survived and thrived, terrestrial dinosaurs did not. Taking their place as the dominant land and sea tetrapods were mammals, whose radiation was explosive following nonavian dinosaur extinction.Archibald argues that because of dinosaurs, Mesozoic mammals changed relatively slowly for 145 million years compared to the prodigious Cenozoic radiation that followed. Finally out from under the shadow of the giant reptiles, Cenozoic mammals evolved into the forms we recognize today in a mere ten million years after dinosaur extinction.Extinction and Radiation is the first book to convincingly link the rise of mammals with the fall of dinosaurs. Piecing together evidence from both molecular biology and the fossil record, Archibald shows how science is edging closer to understanding exactly what happened during the mass extinctions near the K/T boundary and the radiation that followed.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title convincingly link the rise of mammals with the fall of dinosaurs. Piecing together evidence from both molecular biology and the fossil record, Archibald shows how science is edging closer to understanding exactly what happened during the mass extinctions near the K/T boundary and the radiation that followed.
Main Description
In the geological blink of an eye, mammals moved from an obscure group of vertebrates into a class of planetary dominance. Why? J. David Archibald's provocative study identifies the fall of dinosaurs as the factor that allowed mammals to evolve into the dominant tetrapod form. Archibald refutes the widely accepted single-cause impact theory for dinosaur extinction. He demonstrates that multiple factors -- massive volcanic eruptions, loss of shallow seas, and extraterrestrial impact -- likely led to their demise. While their avian relatives ultimately survived and thrived, terrestrial dinosaurs did not. Taking their place as the dominant land and sea tetrapods were mammals, whose radiation was explosive following nonavian dinosaur extinction. Archibald argues that because of dinosaurs, Mesozoic mammals changed relatively slowly for 145 million years compared to the prodigious Cenozoic radiation that followed. Finally out from under the shadow of the giant reptiles, Cenozoic mammals evolved into the forms we recognize today in a mere ten million years after dinosaur extinction. Extinction and Radiation is the first book to convincingly link the rise of mammals with the fall of dinosaurs. Piecing together evidence from both molecular biology and the fossil record, Archibald shows how science is edging closer to understanding exactly what happened during the mass extinctions near the K/T boundary and the radiation that followed.

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