Catalogue


The Cambridge introduction to the novel /
Marina MacKay.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2011.
description
x, 217 p.
ISBN
052171334X (Paper), 9780521713344 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2011.
isbn
052171334X (Paper)
9780521713344 (Paper)
abstract
"Beginning its life as the sensational entertainment of the eighteenth century, the novel has become the major literary genre of modern times. Drawing on hundreds of examples of famous novels from all over the world, Marina MacKay explores the essential aspects of the novel and its history: where novels came from and why we read them; how we think about their styles and techniques, their people, plots, places, and politics. Between the main chapters are longer readings of individual works, from Don Quixote to Midnight's Children. A glossary of key terms and a guide to further reading are included, making this an ideal accompaniment to introductory courses on the novel"--
catalogue key
7407743
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-04-15:
MacKay (English, Washington Univ., St. Louis) here makes a significant contribution to the understanding and appreciation of the novel, calling this a "book about what novels are and what they do." She explores the history of the form, which can be traced to classical antiquity or 18th-century England, depending on how one defines "novel." Each chapter explores a particular aspect of the novel, such as narration, character, and setting. Following each chapter is an accessible interchapter in which MacKay further explores that aspect through a specific novel, ranging from Don Quixote through some usual examples to Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children. The chapters are largely self-contained, enabling the reader to focus quickly and effectively. In addition, a glossary of terms is provided, with first usage in the book bolded to signify that a definition is available. VERDICT With a wealth of information and examples, this book will enrich the understanding of undergraduates who use it as supplementary text. Also indispensible to teachers and any reader interested in the novel's evolution.-Anthony Pucci, Notre Dame H.S., Elmira, NY (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Beginning its life as the sensational entertainment of the eighteenth century, the novel has become the major literary genre of modern times. Drawing on hundreds of examples of famous novels from all over the world, Marina MacKay explores the essential aspects of the novel and its history: where novels came from and why we read them; how we think about their styles and techniques, their people, plots, places, and politics. Between the main chapters are longer readings of individual works, from Don Quixote to Midnight's Children. A glossary of key terms and a guide to further reading are included, making this an ideal accompaniment to introductory courses on the novel.
Table of Contents
About this book
Why the novel matters
Interchapter: Don Quixote
Origins of the novel
Interchapter: Tristram Shandy
Narrating the novel
Interchapter: Justified Sinner
Character and the novel
Interchapter: The Scarlet Letter
Plotting the novel
Interchapter: Madame Bovary
Setting the novel
Interchapter: Bleak House
Time and history
Interchapter: To the Lighthouse
Genre and subgenre
Interchapter: The Ministry of Fear
Novel and anti-novel
Interchapter: The Crying of Lot 49
Novel, nation, community
Interchapter: Midnight's Children
Concluding
Glossary
Further reading
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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