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Unwanted daughters : gender discrimination in modern India /
editors, T.V. Sekher, Neelambar Hatti.
imprint
Jaipur : Rawat Publications, c2010.
description
xx, 276 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN
8131603237, 9788131603239
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jaipur : Rawat Publications, c2010.
isbn
8131603237
9788131603239
contents note
Unwanted daughters : gender discrimination in modern India / T.V. Sekher and Neelambar Hatti -- Risky lives : Indian girls caught between individual rationality and public good / Tulsi Patel -- Inter-generational interests, uncertainty and discrimination : declining child sex ratios in India / Mattias Larsen, Neelambar Hatti and Pernille Gooch -- From "fertility control" to "gender control"? : Evidences of daughter discrimination in rural South India / T.V. Sekher, Neelambar Hatti and Preethi Bhat -- Factors influencing the use of prenatal diagnostic techniques and the sex ratio at birth in India / P.N. Mari Bhat and A.J. Frances Zavier -- Imbalance in sex ratio in rural Tamil Nadu : a case study of Salem District / C.P. Prakasam -- Traditions in transformation : emerging son preference attitudes among the Nairs of Kerala / S. Sudha ... [et al.] -- Status of the girl child and son preference in Madurai / Mumtaj Begum and Christianna Singh -- Implications of declining sex ratio on marriage squeeze of India / Priyajit Samaiyar and William Joe -- Active and passive elimination of girl child : findings from rural Haryana / Sutapa Agrawal and Sayeed Unisa -- Across-region marriages : poverty, female migration and sex ratio / Ravinder Kaur.
abstract
Papers presented at a workshop held at Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bangalore in 2005.
catalogue key
7406852
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
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Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
Papers presented at a workshop held at Bangalore in 2005.
Library of Congress Summary
Papers presented at a workshop held at Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bangalore in 2005.
Main Description
During the past two decades, considerable debate has taken place, particularly in India, on the imbalance in gender ratio and the question of 'missing women.' However, the recent discourses in India have changed the focus from 'missing women' to 'missing girls,' highlighting the precarious situation of female children before birth, at birth, and during childhood. Fetuses have been aborted on a massive scale in recent decades simply because of gender. This raises many questions: Why are female children still at risk despite the progress in female literacy and the growing participation of women in economic and political activities? Is there a significant shift from perceived 'son preference' to deliberate 'daughter discrimination' at the household level? Are the advances in reproductive technologies helping couples to achieve the preferred family size and the desired gender of children? Is there a growing realization that daughters are rarely able to 'substitute' for sons, resulting in an intensification of gender bias even among the better-off sections of the Indian society? In order to answer these questions, it is necessary to understand the nexus of economic, social, and cultural factors that underlie daughter discrimination. Based on extensive research, the essays in this book - by sociologists, demographers, economists, and gender specialists - provide a multidisciplinary perspective to the varied facets of increasing gender bias in contemporary India. The contributing scholars emphasize the need for a change in the attitudes of society towards girls as a lasting solution to this social epidemic.
Main Description
During the past two decades, considerable debate has taken place, particularly in India, on the imbalance in sex ratio and the question of missing women. However, the recent discourses in India have changed the focus from missing women to missing girls, highlighting the precarious situation of female children before birth, at birth and during childhood. The girls have been aborted on a massive scale in recent decades simply because they are girls. This raises many questions: Why are girl children still at risk despite progress in female literacy and growing participation of women in economic and political activities? Is there a significant shift from perceived son preference to deliberate daughter discrimination at household level? Are the advances in reproductive technologies helping the couples to achieve the preferred family size and the desired sex composition of children? Is there a growing realization that daughters are rarely able to substitute the sons resulting in
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xvii
Contributorsp. xix
Introduction-Unwanted Daughters: Gender Discrimination in Modern Indiap. 1
Risky Lives: Indian Girls Caught between Individual Rationality and Public Goodp. 16
Inter-generational Interests, Uncertainty and Discrimination: Declining Child Sex Ratios in Indiap. 38
From 'Fertility Control' to 'Gender Control'?: Evidences of Daughter Discrimination in Rural South Indiap. 75
Factors Influencing the Use of Prenatal Diagnostic Techniques and the Sex Ratio at Birth in Indiap. 104
Imbalance in Sex Ratio in Rural Tamil Nadu: A Case Study of Salem Districtp. 140
Traditions in Transformation: Emerging Son Preference Attitudes among the Nairs of Keralap. 153
Status of the Girl Child and Son Preference in Maduraip. 182
Implications of Declining Sex Ratio on Marriage Squeeze of Indiap. 205
Active and Passive Elimination of Girl Child: Findings from Rural Haryanap. 222
Across-Region Marriages: Poverty, Female Migration and Sex Ratiop. 244
Indexp. 270
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