Catalogue


The last Ottomans : the Muslim minority of Greece 1940-1949 /
Kevin Featherstone ... [et al].
imprint
Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xxiv, 343 p.
ISBN
0230232515 (cloth), 9780230232518 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230232515 (cloth)
9780230232518 (cloth)
catalogue key
7404073
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kevin Featherstone is Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Director of the Hellenic Observatory at the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK. He has published widely on European and Greek politics. Two of his recent books are Politics and Policy in Greece (editor, 2005) and The Limits of Europeanization (with D. Papadimitriou; Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). Dimitris Papadimitriou is Reader in European Politics at the University of Manchester, UK. His research interests focus on Greek politics, the Balkans and the European Union's external relations. His most recent books include The Limits of Europeanization (with K. Featherstone; Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) and From Marginalisation to Membership (with D. Phinnemore, 2008) Argyris Mamarelis was Research Fellow of the Hellenic Observatory of the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK during 2006-8. His research interests include Modern Greek History, World War II History, Balkan History and Politics. He has made several contributions to academic journals, edited books and international conferences on Greek history in the 1940s. Georgios Niarchos was Research Fellow of the Hellenic Observatory of the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK during 2006-8. His research interests include Greek-Turkish Relations, Balkan History and Minorities. He has made several contributions to academic journals and edited volumes, and to international conferences on minorities in Greece and Turkey.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of the international and local politics surrounding the Muslim minority of Western Thrace (Greece) in the 1940s, based on previously unseen archival material.
Description for Bookstore
A major new study of the international and local politics surrounding the Muslim minority of Western Thrace (Greece) in the 1940s, based on previously unseen archival material
Description for Bookstore
A major new study of the international and local politics surrounding the Muslim minority of Western Thrace (Greece) in the 1940s, based on previously unseen archival material
Long Description
Why, when faced with a brutal occupation and then a bloody civil war, did the Muslims on Greece's border with Turkey remain passive and 'loyal'? The Lausanne Treaty of 1923 had recognized them as a vulnerable minority and there were a number of international and local factors that might have led to ethnic conflict. This first in-depth historical study of the minority explores the puzzle of the absence of conflict, the complex patterns of identity of the minority, and the strategic relevance of this community to the international relations of a region long seen as a powder-keg. It is based on extensive Greek, Turkish and Bulgarian archive materials, many of which have not been analyzed before, as well as personal interviews with many of those who lived through these events. The Last Ottomans addresses the Muslim minority's relations with other communities in the area and its position in the context of Greco-Turkish relations, the international diplomacy of WWII and strategic considerations of the early Cold War.
Long Description
Why, when faced with a brutal occupation and then a bloody civil war, did the Muslims on Greece's border with Turkey remain passive? The Lausanne Treaty of 1923 had recognized them as a vulnerable minority and there were a number of international and local factors that might have led to ethnic conflict. This first in-depth historical study of the minority explores the puzzle of the absence of conflict, the complex patterns of identity of the minority, and the strategic relevance of this community to the international relations of a region long seen as a powder-keg. It is based on extensive Greek, Turkish and Bulgarian archive materials, many of which have not been analyzed before, as well as the official documents of the British and US governments and personal interviews with many of those who lived through these events. The Last Ottomans traces a fascinating, untold story and tells it through an inter-disciplinary lens, raising important questions of relevance not only to the 1940s but also to the inherited assumptions and images of today.
Main Description
This book provides a new study of the international and local politics surrounding the Muslim minority of Western Thrace (Greece) in the 1940s, based on previously unseen archival material. It addresses the minority's complex identity, its relations with other communities in the area, the international diplomacy of WWII and strategic considerations of the Cold War.
Main Description
This book provides a new study of the international and local politics surrounding the Muslim minority of Western Thrace (Greece) in the 1940s, based on previously unseen archival material. It addresses the minority’s complex identity, its relations with other communities in the area, the international diplomacy of WWII and strategic considerations of the Cold War.
Table of Contents
List of Boxesp. x
List of Tablesp. xii
List of Maps and Platesp. xiii
List of Abbreviationsp. xiv
List of Place Namesp. xvi
Prefacep. xxi
Introductionp. 1
An historical puzzle: the Muslims of Western Thrace during two warsp. 1
Positioning the case studyp. 5
A note on sources and methodologyp. 7
The Muslim Community of Western Thrace in Contextp. 11
Introductionp. 11
The physical and human geography of Western Thracep. 12
Location, location, locationp. 12
Distant neighboursp. 18
Stillborn attempts for Thracian statehoodp. 24
The Tamrash (TbMpbIII) Rebellion (1878-1886)p. 25
The Republic of Gümülcine (1913)p. 27
The Turkish Republic of Western Thrace (1920)p. 30
The question of Thrace within the context of socialist internationalismp. 33
The 'minoritisation' of the Muslims of Western Thracep. 36
The political orientation of the minority during the 1930sp. 41
Between Ottoman 'traditionalism' and Kemalist 'progress'p. 41
The electoral behaviour of the Muslim minority in the 1930sp. 45
Conclusionp. 51
On the Path to Warp. 54
Introductionp. 54
Shifting balances in the Balkans: the international context prior to WWIIp. 55
Western Thrace prepares for warp. 65
The Muslim community of Western Thrace and the outbreak of warp. 69
Changing loyalties: the battle(s) for Turkey's neutralityp. 83
Conclusionp. 90
Belomoriep. 91
Introductionp. 91
The arrival of the Bulgarian administrationp. 91
Accounts of Bulgarian repressionp. 93
The economic impact of the Bulgarian occupationp. 101
Wartime population movementsp. 108
Education and religion as vehicles of Bulgarian nationalismp. 113
Smaller minority groups in wartime Western Thracep. 120
The Armenian communityp. 120
The Roma communityp. 123
The Jewish communityp. 125
Conclusionsp. 129
Strategies for Survivalp. 131
Introductionp. 131
The onset of resistance activity in occupied Greecep. 132
The activity of EAM-ELAS in Western Thracep. 136
The activity of the nationalist resistance groups in Western Thracep. 143
Muslim collaboration with the Bulgarian forcesp. 148
The Turkish Consulate of Komotinip. 152
Conclusionsp. 156
In-Between Two Warsp. 158
Introductionp. 158
The fall of the Bulgarian empirep. 159
The Allies advancep. 159
Bulgaria tries to stayp. 160
Playing the 'Pomak Card'p. 166
A muted liberationp. 174
From chaos to chaosp. 184
The Muslim community at the pollsp. 186
No turning backp. 188
Conclusionp. 189
Çekiç Ile Örs Arasinda (Between a Rock and a Hard Place)p. 192
Introductionp. 192
Muslim soldiers of the Proletarian revolutionp. 193
The military strategy of the DSE in Western Thracep. 194
DSE recruitment and violence in Muslim villagesp. 196
The Ottoman Battalion of the DSEp. 204
Women recruitment in the Ottoman battalionp. 207
The endgame of the civil warp. 210
Good Muslim, bad Muslimp. 215
Muslim recruitment in the Greek army and government-sponsored militiasp. 217
Evidence of state-induced violence against the Muslim communityp. 222
Court-Martial cases involving members of the Muslim communityp. 226
The battle for Muslim hearts and mindsp. 229
Communist propaganda in the Rhodope Mountainsp. 229
State-organised anti-communist propagandap. 235
Conclusionp. 242
Parallel Universesp. 245
Introductionp. 245
The Muslim community between two authoritiesp. 245
The return of the Greek state to Western Thracep. 245
The Soviet Muslim Republic of Western Thracep. 250
Muslim immigration to Turkey during the civil warp. 259
Immigration talesp. 260
The response of the Greek authorities to the Muslim emigrationp. 264
Welfare provision for the 'guerrilla-stricken'p. 268
The distribution of government aid in Western Thracep. 269
The welfare of children as an instrument of warp. 273
Minority education during the civil warp. 277
Educating 'nationally-minded' Greeksp. 279
Educating Muslim communistsp. 284
Conclusionp. 289
Conclusionp. 291
The strategic relevance of kindred minoritiesp. 292
Resistance and insurgencyp. 294
Identity, 'groupness' and warp. 297
Future researchp. 301
The nexus between past and presentp. 302
Sourcesp. 305
Indexp. 333
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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