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Work your strengths : a scientific process to identify your skills and match them to the best career for you /
Chuck Martin, Richard Guare, Peg Dawson.
imprint
New York : American Management Association, 2010.
description
xv, 235 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814414079, 9780814414071
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : American Management Association, 2010.
isbn
0814414079
9780814414071
general note
Includes indexes.
catalogue key
7403239
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
No more haphazard job switching, hazy career path, or worse, landing a really great job that you're really bad at! Now there's a surefire, scientific way to pinpoint the best job for youand those you should definitely avoid. Work Your Strengths taps into the powerful new concept of Executive Skills, which you can use to predict and maximize career success. With Work Your Strengths , the groundbreaking neuroscience behind the Executive Skills model has finally been brought into the career realm. Executive Skills aren't simply your IQ or temperament or even education and training. Instead, they're a combination of brain functions that begin at birth and become hardwired in adulthood. Take the authors' free online test to discover your innate strengths and weaknesses in areas such as working memory, emotional control, sustained attention, organizational skills, goal-directed persistence, flexibility, stress tolerance, and more. By matching your own profile against the Executive Skills of high achievers in a multitude of professions and industries, you'll understand exactly which ones are crucial in which positionsand which weaknesses could spell serious trouble in specific jobs, departments, and industries. The authors dig deeper than the vague "good with numbers" or "likes working with people" assessments. And the focus is far more practical than career books that ask you to explore your inner desires. Instead, Work Your Strengths draws on original research with more than two thousand people at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500s to nonprofits, and at all levels, from CEOs to frontline employees. This is solid, real-life data that you can use to match how your brain is wired with the wiring of people already successful in specific jobs. And the book makes its message plain, with an easy-to-read style devoid of scientific jargon and an abundance of examples of everyday behaviors that indicate high or low skills in each of the twelve areas. Whether you are seeking a new and better job for yourself, or a manager struggling to match the right employees with the right jobs, Work Your Strengths brings you a completely new, science-based way to build a highly successful career. Chuck Martin is the Chairman and CEO of NFI Research, a top management research firm, and a highly sought-after speaker. Richard Guare, Ph.D. , is a neuropsychologist and the director of the Center for Learning and Attention Disorders. Peg Dawson, Ed.D. , is a psychologist at the Center for Learning and Attention Disorders. Together, they are the authors of Smarts: Are We Hardwired for Success?
Flap Copy
No more haphazard job switching, hazy career path, or worse, landing a really great job that you're really bad at! Now there's a surefire, scientific way to pinpoint the best job for youand those you should definitely avoid. Work Your Strengthstaps into the powerful new concept of Executive Skills, which you can use to predict and maximize career success. With Work Your Strengths, the groundbreaking neuroscience behind the Executive Skills model has finally been brought into the career realm. Executive Skills aren't simply your IQ or temperament or even education and training. Instead, they're a combination of brain functions that begin at birth and become hardwired in adulthood. Take the authors' free online test to discover your innate strengths and weaknesses in areas such as working memory, emotional control, sustained attention, organizational skills, goal-directed persistence, flexibility, stress tolerance, and more. By matching your own profile against the Executive Skills of high achievers in a multitude of professions and industries, you'll understand exactly which ones are crucial in which positionsand which weaknesses could spell serious trouble in specific jobs, departments, and industries. The authors dig deeper than the vague "good with numbers" or "likes working with people" assessments. And the focus is far more practical than career books that ask you to explore your inner desires. Instead, Work Your Strengthsdraws on original research with more than two thousand people at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500s to nonprofits, and at all levels, from CEOs to frontline employees. This is solid, real-life data that you can use to match how your brain is wired with the wiring of people already successful in specific jobs. And the book makes its message plain, with an easy-to-read style devoid of scientific jargon and an abundance of examples of everyday behaviors that indicate high or low skills in each of the twelve areas. Whether you are seeking a new and better job for yourself, or a manager struggling to match the right employees with the right jobs, Work Your Strengthsbrings you a completely new, science-based way to build a highly successful career. Chuck Martinis the Chairman and CEO of NFI Research, a top management research firm, and a highly sought-after speaker. Richard Guare, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist and the director of the Center for Learning and Attention Disorders. Peg Dawson, Ed.D., is a psychologist at the Center for Learning and Attention Disorders. Together, they are the authors of Smarts: Are We Hardwired for Success?
First Chapter

INTRODUCTION

Finding the Right Job

YOU MAY BE a smart person but still feel you’re in the wrong position

at work or even the wrong career.And youmay be right.Your brain is hardwired

to function a specific way. If you’re not in a position where your

strongest skills are vital, you’re not likely to excel.Worse, if you’re in a position

where your weakest skills are vital, you’re going to feel it and are likely

to fail.You won’t look forward to going to work because what you do doesn’t

fit how your brain is wired. Your job will be unnatural and highly challenging.

While the idea of finding the job most suited to you seems simple

enough, there are many instances when it doesn’t happen. Someone may

convince you that you’re the right person for a particular job or promotion,

you accept it, and over time it doesn’t work out as planned. Or you may get

promoted because you’ve performed well in your current position, only to

find out you’re not suited for the new role.When this happens, nobody wins.

Over the course of a career, you may move from job to job until you

finally fall into a position that seems perfect. It could be that over a long

period of time you and many others end up in the right position, but it’s

often by chance.

But what if you could predetermine which position or career is the right

one for you to increase your probability of success? Imagine if, as an individual,

you could take years away from trial and error in jobs along your

career path by scientifically determining in advance how well a particular

position would suit you.

The purpose of this book is to provide you with that insight. It’s the

result of a two-year study we conducted to answer these and other questions.

We sought to map certain cognitive skills of high-performing individuals

to what they do and where they work. These skills are called

Executive Skills because they help you execute tasks. The idea is to navigate

yourself into positions that play to your innate strengths. It’s about matching

how your brain is wired to the job or task based on how the brains of

those already successful in those jobs are wired. Though this isn’t always

possible from a practical standpoint in business, you’d still know when a

certain task or function you’re required to perform would be a good or a

bad fit for your strengths and weaknesses and plan accordingly.You’d know

in advance what kind of help you need to enlist.

Similarly, if you have people reporting to you or people you mentor,

you could help them determine what role or job would be best for them.

The best way tomotivate is to get themost appropriate people in the positions

most suitable to them. This is like the concept, familiar to many in

business, of getting the right people in the right seat on the right bus.1We

call this placing of a person in the correct job or position by matching

Executive Skills with those required for the job first-time right-seating.

As an executive or a manager, imagine being able to promote and move

subordinates along their career path knowing their inherent Executive

Skills strengths and weaknesses. This knowledge could be helpful to determine

where an employee is most likely to succeed. And if a certain position

requires a person’s weaknesses in one job along a career path, at least

you’ll know in advance so that appropriate support can be provided while

the person is in that role.

Playing to Strengths Leads to Goodness of Fit

If you’ve held several positions in your career, you may recall that one was

either a lot easier or a lot harder than others. This could have been an

Executive Skills match or mismatch, where your strengths were those that

were required for the job—or not.

When your strengths match those required for a task, it’s called a goodness-

of-fit situation. The main objective in understanding and utilizing

Executive Skills profiling is to strive for positions that cause goodness-offit

situations. This can help explain why a person isn’t successful in one

position and then changes positions or companies and becomes successful.

While it may appear to observers that the person changed and

improved, the reality is that the situation changed and better suited the person’s

Executive Skills strengths.

And when your strengths match what you do, you’re more likely to be

successful and even look forward to work because what you’re doing there

feels natural. This can lead to rewards, including compensation, bonuses,

and promotions. As a successful person—a high performer—you will

likely stand out among your peers and generally be acknowledged bymanagement.

And consistently using this knowledge can help you throughout

your entire career.

If you’re a manager, this knowledge can also make you a star, because

you’ll consistently place the right people in the right positions and can bask

in the halo effects of their success.

More than 100 researchers worked on various parts of this study to help

identify the cognitive characteristics of high-performing people in business.

2 We questioned more than 2,500 people at hundreds of organizations

of all types, from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits at every level, from

employee to CEO. The goal was to provide you with a solid scientific

method for finding your ideal field, job, and position.

Matching Strengths of High-Performing Individuals

The basis of determining a person’s strengths and weaknesses in Executive

Skills is well grounded in neuropsychology and revolves around those

fixed functions associated with the frontal lobes. For many years, psychologists

have used knowledge of the development of these functions

from childhood through adolescence to provide guidelines for assessment

and to help children and teenagers. However, it’s only recently that this

knowledge has been taken to the next level (notably in our last book,

SMARTS: AreWe Hardwired for Success?), which is helping adults like you

use knowledge about these fixed skills for work and life.

This book attempts to advance this even further, by highlighting which

specific Executive Skills are mostly found in the stars at work, those successful

in business across a range of categories. There are specific similarities

and differences by a range of categories of high-performing individuals:

 Employees, managers, and executives have different strengths, but

they all share a common weakness.

 Themost commonly found strength in high-performingmales and

females is different.

 Almost all high performers in information technology (IT) are not

weak in one particular Executive Skill.

 IT executives are better at handling stress than IT employees.

 High performers who work in clinical departments are strong in

one Executive Skill that is a dominant weakness of those in IT.

 High performers in finance, administrative, and sales share a common

strength.

 CEOs and CFOs share the same three most commonly found

strengths.

 High performers inmarketing/advertising/promotion departments

are not weak in a certain skill.

 There is one particular strength in high performers in customer

service departments, and the overwhelming majority of high performers

in customer service are not weak in it.

 There is one strength found in sales managers and executives that

is not frequently found in sales employees.

 Of all high performers strong in one Executive Skill, 35 percent are

either a CEO or CFO.

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-05-15:
The coauthors of Smarts: Are We Hardwired for Success return to identify 12 "Executive Skills" found in high performers from several industries. Skills run from emotional control to metacognition, with examples. The emphasis is on exploring career paths that take advantage of your skill strengths while minimizing the impact of the other "Executive Skills" that may not be your strongest (rather than trying to turn your weaker areas into your strengths). Chapters seem haphazard, and there is no skills inventory the reader can use to set benchmarks. A web site is provided at which readers can use an "Executive Skills Profile" tool (at review time, the link did not contain book-related content). This book is not recommended. Instead, interested readers should turn to Esther Cameron and Mike Green's Making Sense of Leadership for a better analysis of leadership qualities. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2010-03-29:
Martin, chairman and CEO of NFI Research, along with Guare, a neuropsychologist, and Dawson, a psychologist, both at the Center for Learning and Attention Disorders, reunite to aid readers in identifying their core skills to find a perfectly suited job match. Building on the theories put forth in their previous book, Smarts, the authors conducted a two-year study that revealed how the cognitive skills of high performing individuals aligned to what they do and where they work. Their research helps readers gravitate to work roles that play to their innate strengths and to how their brains are wired. The authors overexplain a relatively simple premise, citing extensive scientific evidence, which may turn off readers looking for a good career fit in a tumultuous job market without the heavy-duty explanations. The book offers guidance on how to choose the right career path, determine your best industry and department, and avoid taking the wrong promotion. Only those who are willing to devote considerable time and effort will find much benefit. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
HEADLINE:The Executive Skills:HEADLINE Although researchers have various ways of labeling, defining, and organizing Executive Skills, our model encompasses 12 separate skills that are most relevant to the way people function in a work environment. Despite the term Executive Skills, whose use in neuropsychology dates back decades, there's no connection to executives at work and no connection to the traditional meaning of skills. Executive Skills should not be confused with functions or skills of executives, because Executive Skills are how the frontal lobes and associated brain areas manage information and behavior. And these are not skills that can be learned; they are cognitive functions that are hardwired into the brain from birth. Each person has a set of strongest and weakest of these cognitive functions in their makeup. Generally, they have two or three that are their strongest and two or three that are their weakest. Those in the middle are not likely to get you in trouble, though they can't be dramatically improved either. Throughout the book, we focus on the three strongest and the three weakest of the Executive Skills across all high performers. Everyone has this personal combination of strengths and weaknesses, and the mix varies from person to person. There are 12 Executive Skills, and certain ones are prevalent in high-performing individuals in business. 1. Response Inhibition: This is the ability to think before you act. It is the ability to resist the urge to say or do something to allow time to evaluate the situation and how a behavior might affect it. 2. Working Memory: This is the ability to hold information in memory while performing complex tasks. It involves drawing on past learning or experience to apply to the situation at hand or to project into the future. 3. Emotional Control: This is the ability to manage emotions in order to achieve goals, complete tasks, or control and direct behavior. 4. Sustained Attention: This is the capacity to maintain attention to a situation or task in spite of distractibility, fatigue, or boredom. 5. Task Initiation:This is the ability to begin projects or tasks without undue procrastination. 6. Planning/Prioritization: This is the capacity to develop a road map to arrive at a destination or goal, and knowing which are the most important signposts along the way. 7. Organization: This is the ability to arrange or place according to a system. 8. Time Management:This is the capacity to estimate how much time one has, to allocate it effectively, and to stay within time limits and deadlines. It involves a sense that time is important. 9. Goal-Directed Persistence: This is the capacity to have a goal, follow through to the completion of the goal, and not be put off or distracted by competing interests along the way.

This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 2010
Library Journal, May 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Do you panic when your car won't start or blurt out the first thing that pops in your mind? Can you keep track of your possessions and remember your appointments? How good are you at coming up with long-term plans and then actually sticking to them? The answers are determined by your Executive Skills, a set of cognitive functions hard­wired in the adult brain that define who you are and how you operate. Figure out the strengths and weaknesses of your own skill set and you can figure out exactly what job you'll excel at. That's the promise of Work Your Strengths , the most on-target, research-based career advice you'll ever find. Written by an award-winning author, together with experts in the field of neuroscience and psychology, Work Your Strengths draws on the latest discoveries about the brain and the authors' original data to help you accurately assess your Executive Skills, pinpoint your ideal joband avoid potential trouble. You'll learn about working memory, emotional control, sustained attention, organizational skills, goal-directed persistence, flexibility, stress tolerance, and moreskills that can make or break your chances of success. Take a free online test to gauge your own skill set, then match your profile against the Executive Skills exhibited by more than two thousand high achievers in a multitude of industries and positions. Packed with the authors' eye-opening findings, this unique book gives you a wholly new, scientifically sound way to play to your strengthsand locate the job that best fits your own strongest set of Executive Skills.
Back Cover Copy
Do you panic when your car won't start or blurt out the first thing that pops in your mind? Can you keep track of your possessions and remember your appointments? How good are you at coming up with long-term plans and then actually sticking to them? The answers are determined by your Executive Skills, a set of cognitive functions hardwired in the adult brain that define who you are and how you operate. Figure out the strengths and weaknesses of your own skill set and you can figure out exactly what job you'll excel at. That's the promise of Work Your Strengths , the most on-target, research-based career advice you'll ever find. Written by an award-winning author, together with experts in the field of neuroscience and psychology, Work Your Strengths draws on the latest discoveries about the brain and the authors' original data to help you accurately assess your Executive Skills, pinpoint your ideal joband avoid potential trouble. You'll learn about working memory, emotional control, sustained attention, organizational skills, goal-directed persistence, flexibility, stress tolerance, and moreskills that can make or break your chances of success. Take a free online test to gauge your own skill set, then match your profile against the Executive Skills exhibited by more than two thousand high achievers in a multitude of industries and positions. Packed with the authors' eye-opening findings, this unique book gives you a wholly new, scientifically sound way to play to your strengthsand locate the job that best fits your own strongest set of Executive Skills.
Back Cover Copy
Do you panic when your car won't start or blurt out the first thing that pops in your mind? Can you keep track of your possessions and remember your appointments? How good are you at coming up with long-term plans and then actually sticking to them? The answers are determined by your Executive Skills, a set of cognitive functions hardwired in the adult brain that define who you are and how you operate. Figure out the strengths and weaknesses of your own skill set and you can figure out exactly what job you'll excel at. That's the promise of Work Your Strengths, the most on-target, research-based career advice you'll ever find. Written by an award-winning author, together with experts in the field of neuroscience and psychology, Work Your Strengthsdraws on the latest discoveries about the brain and the authors' original data to help you accurately assess your Executive Skills, pinpoint your ideal joband avoid potential trouble. You'll learn about working memory, emotional control, sustained attention, organizational skills, goal-directed persistence, flexibility, stress tolerance, and moreskills that can make or break your chances of success. Take a free online test to gauge your own skill set, then match your profile against the Executive Skills exhibited by more than two thousand high achievers in a multitude of industries and positions. Packed with the authors' eye-opening findings, this unique book gives you a wholly new, scientifically sound way to play to your strengthsand locate the job that best fits your own strongest set of Executive Skills.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Ever feel like you're in the wrong job, maybe even the wrong career? You may be right. This book helps you avoid 'trial-and-error' career moves by matching your strengths to the jobs that call on those skills specifically.
Description for Bookstore
Ever feel like you're in the wrong job, maybe even the wrong career? You may be right. But before you make another move, consider this: your brain is hardwired with a unique combination of 12 different Executive Skills'”the cognitive strengths that determine how well you will perform in a particular role. Your strongest and weakest Executive Skills can make the difference between big-time career success and years of disappointment and failure.Work Your Strengthshelps you avoid 'œtrial-and-error' career moves by matching your strengths to the jobs that call on those skills specifically. Based on the authors' two-year study of more than 2000 top-performers at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits, the book reveals which strengths correlate with success in different jobs. Take a one-time, free online profile to determine your unique strengths and weaknesses and then use that information to identify your ideal career path.Not ready for a move yet?Work Your Strengthscan also make a world of difference in the job you're in now. It can help you not only focus on the projects best suited for you but also recognize skills in others and assign tasks accordingly. So whether you're planning a jump to the career of your dreams or just wondering how to make your current job easier and more rewarding, Work Your Strengths gives you the science and the system to find your success.
Description for Bookstore
Ever feel like you're in the wrong job, maybe even the wrong career? You may be right. But before you make another move, consider this: Your brain is hardwired with a unique combination of 12 different Executive Skillsthe cognitive strengths that determine how well you will perform in a particular role. Your strongest and weakest Executive Skills can make the difference between big-time career success and years of disappointment and failure. Work Your Strengths helps you avoid "trial-and-error" career moves by matching your strengths to the jobs that call on those skills specifically. Based on the authors' two-year study of more than 2000 top-performers at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits, the book reveals which strengths correlate with success in different jobs. Take a one-time, free online profile to determine your unique strengths and weaknesses and then use that information to identify your ideal career path. Not ready for a move yet? Work Your Strengths can also make a world of difference in the job you're in now. It can help you not only focus on the projects best suited for you but also recognize skills in others and assign tasks accordingly. So whether you're planning a jump to the career of your dreams or just wondering how to make your current job easier and more rewarding, Work Your Strengths gives you the science and the system to find your success.
Description for Bookstore
Ever feel like you're in the wrong job, maybe even the wrong career? You may be right. But before you make another move, consider this: Your brain is hardwired with a unique combination of 12 different Executive Skillsthe cognitive strengths that determine how well you will perform in a particular role. Your strongest and weakest Executive Skills can make the difference between big-time career success and years of disappointment and failure. Work Your Strengthshelps you avoid "trial-and-error" career oves by matching your strengths to the jobs that call on those skills specifically. Based on the authors' two-year study of more than 2000 top-performers at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits, the book reveals which strengths correlate with success in different jobs. Take a one-time, free online profile to determine your unique strengths and weaknesses and then use that information to identify your ideal career path. Not ready for a move yet? Work Your Strengths can also make a world of difference in the job you're in now. It can help you not only focus on the projects best suited for you but also recognize skills in others and assign tasks accordingly. So whether you're planning a jump to the career of your dreams or just wondering how to make your current job easier and more rewarding, Work Your Strengths gives you the science and the system to find your success.
Main Description
Do you panic when your car won't start or blurt out the first thing that pops in your mind? Can you keep track of your possessions and remember your appointments? How good are you at coming up with long-term plans and then actually sticking to them?
Main Description
Ever feel like you're in the wrong job, maybe even the wrong career? You may be right. But before you make another move, consider this: Your brain is hardwired with a unique combination of 12 different Executive Skills - the cognitive strengths that determine how well you will perform in a particular role. Your strongest and weakest Executive Skills can make the difference between big-time career success and years of disappointment and failure. Work Your Strengths helps you avoid "trial-and-error" career moves by matching your strengths to the jobs that call on those skills specifically. Based on the authors' two-year study of more than 2000 top-performers at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits, the book reveals which strengths correlate with success in different jobs. Take a one-time, free online profile to determine your unique strengths and weaknesses and then use that information to identify your ideal career path. Not ready for a move yet? Work Your Strengths can also make a world of difference in the job you're in now. It can help you not only focus on the projects best suited for you but also recognize skills in others and assign tasks accordingly. So whether you're planning ajump to the career of your dreams or just wondering how to make your current job easier and more rewarding, Work Your Strengths gives you the science and the system to find your success.
Main Description
The authors present a scientific process to identify one's skills and match those to the best career choice. The book reveals which strengths correlate with success in different jobs.
Main Description
Work Your Strengths helps you avoid "trial-and-error" career moves by matching your strengths to the jobs that call on those skills specifically. Based on the authors' two-year study of more than 2000 top-performers at hundreds of organizations of all types, from Fortune 500 companies to nonprofits, the book reveals which strengths correlate with success in different jobs. Take a one-time, free online profile to determine your unique strengths and weaknesses and then use that information toidentify your ideal career path. Whether you're planning a jump to the career of your dreams or just wondering how to make your current job easier and more rewarding, Work Your Strengths gives you the science and the system to find your success.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Finding the Right Jobp. 1
Playing to Strengths Leads to Goodness of Fitp. 3
Matching Strengths of High-Performing Individualsp. 3
The Executive Skillsp. 5
Frontal Lobes and Executive Skillsp. 7
The Spread Between Strengths and Weaknesses: The Differentiatorp. 7
Determining Your Own Strengths and Weaknesses and Finding the Strengths and Weaknesses of othersp. 9
Response Inhibitionp. 11
Working Memoryp. 12
Emotional Controlp. 13
Sustained Attentionp. 14
Task Initiationp. 14
Planning/Prioritizationp. 15
Organizationp. 15
Time Managementp. 16
Goal-Directed Persistencep. 16
Flexibilityp. 17
Metacognitionp. 17
Stress Tolerancep. 18
Finding Your Own Strengths and Weaknessesp. 18
Workload and Executive Skillsp. 19
Voices from the Front Lines: Workloadp. 21
Exceeding Your Cognitive Bandwidthp. 22
Knowing in Advancep. 24
Finding Success and Avoiding Failure: Why your Strengths and Weaknesses are the Way they are: The Science behind Executive Skillsp. 26
Executive Skills in Psychologyp. 28
Executive Skills and the Brainp. 28
Executive Skills and Brain Developmentp. 30
What is a high Performer and How do you become One? Selecting the Right Path to increase the Chance of Successp. 35
Performance-Based: Consistency Is Keyp. 36
Quantitative: Expectations and Resultsp. 38
Qualitative: Some Subjectivityp. 39
Position in the Organizationp. 40
Company Firstp. 42
Multidimensionalp. 45
How Many Are High Performers?p. 47
Voices from the Front Lines: Number of High Performersp. 48
What Sets High Performers Apartp. 49
Voices from the Front Lines: What Sets Them Apartp. 50
Navigating your Road to High Performance: Finding Your Skills Combination to Determine What Industry you should be Inp. 52
Most Prevalent Executive Skills Strengths and Weaknessesp. 53
Some Skills Go Hand in Handp. 55
Strengths vs. Commonly Found Weaknessesp. 57
High-Performing Males vs. High-Performing Femalesp. 59
Executive Skills of High Performers by Agep. 61
Task Initiation: The Common Weaknessp. 61
The High-Performing Pairp. 63
Executive Skills of High Performers by Industryp. 65
Financial Servicesp. 67
Healthcarep. 68
Manufacturingp. 70
Technologyp. 71
Educationp. 72
Nonprofitsp. 74
Finding the Matchp. 75
What's the Right Department for you? The Strengths of High Performers by Departmentp. 77
Marketing/Advertising/Promotion: Always Getting Betterp. 78
Sales: Not Falling Through the Cracksp. 80
Systems/IT: All About Road Mapsp. 82
General Management: Goal-Orientedp. 83
Operations: Good on the Flyp. 84
Customer Service: Strategically Importantp. 85
Administrative: Organized and Can Adaptp. 87
Finance: Modify on the Flyp. 89
Accounting: Methodical Approachp. 90
Clinical: Organized and Starting Right Awayp. 91
Executive Skills in a Department: Clinical High Performersp. 93
Right-Seating People the First Timep. 96
Do you Have What it Takes to be in the Corner Suite? Skills Broken Down by Titlep. 98
Are You in the Right Job?p. 98
The Brains in the Corner Officep. 100
The Brains Down the Hallp. 102
The Self-Correcting Directorsp. 104
The Managers with a Planp. 105
The Organized Employeesp. 106
How your Strengths Match Those of Others at Work: Ways to Match Behaviors to Executive Skills in your Businessp. 108
Shared Strengths in One Organizationp. 111
Shared Strengths in Two Nonprofitsp. 113
Mapping Characteristics to Executive Skillsp. 115
Avoiding Potential Conflictsp. 117
Focus on Executive Skills Strengthsp. 118
Voices from the Front Lines: Strengths and Weaknessesp. 119
Healthcare: Clinical vs. Nonclinicalp. 120
High Performers in Sales-Buyer Interactionsp. 122
Observable Behaviorsp. 123
Strong Flexibility: Typical Behaviorsp. 123
Weak Flexibility: Typical Behaviorsp. 124
Strong Response Inhibition: Typical Behaviorsp. 126
Weak Response Inhibition: Typical Behaviorsp. 127
Avoiding the Wrong Promotion: Sorting the Strengths of Employees vs. Managers vs. Executivesp. 129
Voices from the Front Lines: High and Low Performersp. 131
The Failed Sales Promotionp. 132
Voices from the Front Lines: Promoting Salespeople to Managementp. 134
Sales Employees vs. Sales Managementp. 135
Working in a Comfort Zonep. 139
Voices from the Front Lines: Job Satisfactionp. 140
IT Executives Can Shield the Heatp. 141
Operations: Order and Organizationp. 143
Administrative: Organization Is Keyp. 145
Customer Service: Recalling Past Solutionsp. 146
Can Performance Be Predicted?p. 148
Determine your Fit-The High-Performance Executive Skills Map: Where do High Performers With your Strengths Work?p. 150
Response Inhibitionp. 152
Working Memoryp. 152
Emotional Controlp. 153
Sustained Attentionp. 154
Task Initiationp. 154
Planning/Prioritizationp. 155
Organizationp. 155
Time Managementp. 156
Goal-Directed Persistencep. 157
Flexibilityp. 157
Metacognitionp. 158
Stress Tolerancep. 159
The High-Performance Executive Skills Mapp. 160
Industries by Executive Skills Strengthsp. 160
Departments by Executive Skills Strengthsp. 164
Job Functions/Titles by Executive Skills Strengthsp. 168
Conclusionp. 173
How the Two-Year Study was Conducted: High Performers and the Executive Skills Profilep. 179
Determining High Performancep. 181
Using the Executive Skills Profilep. 181
Selecting Subjectsp. 183
Selecting Industry Types and Departmentsp. 184
Job Functions and Titlesp. 185
High Performers by Age and Genderp. 186
High Performers by Company Sizep. 187
The Questionnairep. 187
Organizations in the Studyp. 189
The Study Continuesp. 196
The High-Performance Executive Skills Tablesp. 197
Top Six Industriesp. 198
Executive Skills by Department: Top 10 Departmentsp. 200
Job Function/Titlep. 203
Employees vs. Managers vs. Executivesp. 206
Males vs. Femalesp. 212
Profit vs. Nonprofitp. 212
Profit vs. Nonprofit (Excluding CEOs)p. 213
Healthcare: Clinical vs. Nonclinicalp. 214
About NFI Researchp. 217
Notesp. 219
Indexp. 225
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