Catalogue


Narrative and the politics of identity : the cultural psychology of Israeli and Palestinian youth /
Phillip L. Hammack.
imprint
Oxford ; New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2011.
description
xvi, 406 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195394461 (hbk.), 9780195394467 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2011.
isbn
0195394461 (hbk.)
9780195394467 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7402916
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 369-398) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"With his energy, eloquence, and insight, Phillip Hammack is one of the most promising young scholars in the study of human development. It takes great courage and integrity to enter two of the most oppositional cultural milieus in the world and manage to maintain the confidence of both sides. This book is an unparalleled, invaluable account of the identities, motivations, struggles, and pain of Israeli and Palestinian youth." -- Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, Research Professor, Department of Psychology, Clark University, and author ofEmerging Adulthood: The Winding Road from the Late Teens Throughthe Twenties "Hammack's book is a risky undertaking that has been masterfully executed. The book carefully crosses disciplinary borders, helping us widen our understanding of social phenomena at the individual and group levels, and pays special attention to the intricate connections between individual psychology and social structure as these are mediated through action. Hammack is clear about his commitment to get involved as a scientist in bettering the world and refuses to fall into our traditional illusory vision of science and politics as mutually exclusive." -- Zvi Bekerman, School of Education, Melton Center, Hebrew University of Jerusalem "This book marks the emergence of a brilliant new voice in cultural psychology. Phillip Hammack tells the stories of Palestinian and Israeli youth and shows how the master narratives that comprise their respective cultures shape personal identity and give meaning to individual lives, even as they perpetuate a deadly conflict of global significance. As a social scientist, Hammack offers an intellectual tour de force, filled with surprising theoretical insights and interpretations. And as a storyteller, he engages us on a profoundly emotional level." -- Dan P. McAdams, Chair, Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, and author ofThe Redemptive Self: Stories Americans Live By "This is a compelling, beautifully written, and nuanced study of Israeli, Arab-Israeli, and Palestinian youth. Hammack's study poses important policy questions and makes a major contribution to the study of adolescent psychological development, the politics of identity, and theories of narrative." -- Bertram J. Cohler, William Rainey Harper Professor, University of Chicago "Dr. Hammack paints an engaging canvas of how 'cultures' are contested from within, using narratives of Israeli and Palestinian youth inhabiting a place of vast social and political complexity. This volume represents supreme scholarship; it is ambitious, historically informed, impeccably researched, and profound in its implications." -- Per F. Gjerde, Professor of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz "This brilliant book by an erudite psychologist is about the impact of group conflict on personal identity formation. This book forces us to recognize that well-intended person-to-person encounters between Israeli and Palestinian adolescents are not likely to produce love and understanding." -- Richard A. Shweder, William Claude Reavis Distinguished Service Professor of Human Development, University of Chicago
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Since the late 19th century, Jews and Arabs have been locked in an intractable battle for national recognition in a land of tremendous significance. This book offers an analysis of the consequences of conflict for the psyche before addressing the mutual constitution of culture and mind through the process of life-story construction.
Main Description
Since the late nineteenth century, Jews and Arabs have been locked in an intractable battle for national recognition in a land of tremendous historical and geopolitical significance. While historians and political scientists have long analyzed the dynamics of this bitter conflict, rarely has an archeology of the mind of those who reside within the matrix of conflict been attempted. This book not only offers a psychological analysis of the consequences of conflict for the psyche, it develops an innovative, compelling, and cross-disciplinary argument about the mutual constitution of culture and mind through the process of life-story construction. But the book pushes boundaries further through an analysis of two peace education programs designed to fundamentally alter the nature of young Israeli and Palestinian life stories. Hammack argues that these popular interventions, rooted in the idea of prejudice reduction through contact and the cultivation of 'cosmopolitan' identities, are fundamentally flawed due to their refusal to deal with the actual political reality of young Israeli and Palestinian lives and their attempt to construct an alternative narrative of great hope but little resonance for Israelis and Palestinians. Grounded in over a century of literature that spans the social sciences, Hammack's analysis of young Israeli and Palestinian lives captures the complex, dynamic relationship among politics, history, and identity and offers a provocative and audacious proposal for psychology and peace education.
Main Description
Since the late nineteenth century, Jews and Arabs have been locked in an intractable battle for national recognition in a land of tremendous historical and geopolitical significance. While historians and political scientists have long analyzed the dynamics of this bitter conflict, rarely hasan archeology of the mind of those who reside within the matrix of conflict been attempted. This book not only offers a psychological analysis of the consequences of conflict for the psyche, it develops an innovative, compelling, and cross-disciplinary argument about the mutual constitution ofculture and mind through the process of life-story construction. But the book pushes boundaries further through an analysis of two peace education programs designed to fundamentally alter the nature of young Israeli and Palestinian life stories. Hammack argues that these popular interventions, rooted in the idea of prejudice reduction through contact and thecultivation of 'cosmopolitan' identities, are fundamentally flawed due to their refusal to deal with the actual political reality of young Israeli and Palestinian lives and their attempt to construct an alternative narrative of great hope but little resonance for Israelis and Palestinians. Groundedin over a century of literature that spans the social sciences, Hammack's analysis of young Israeli and Palestinian lives captures the complex, dynamic relationship among politics, history, and identity and offers a provocative and audacious proposal for psychology and peace education.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Orientations
A Note on Geographic Terminologyp. 3
Prologuep. 7
Culture, Identity, and Story: A Framework for the Study of Livesp. 15
Preliminary Provocationsp. 15
Capturing Culturep. 19
Interrogating Identityp. 27
The Cultural Psychology of Identityp. 32
Experimenting With Identityp. 35
The Cosmopolitan Idealp. 42
Identity as Burden or Benefit?p. 44
Politicizing Psychology, Psychologizing Politicsp. 47
An Orientationp. 49
A ôStrangerö in the Holy Landp. 51
A Positionp. 51
A Personal Narrativep. 54
Approaching the Study of Livesp. 59
The Politics of the Fieldp. 61
Field Sites in Israel and Palestinep. 63
Jerusalemp. 64
Ramallahp. 66
Qadasp. 67
Beit Jala and Bethlehemp. 68
Tulkarm and Nablusp. 70
Tel Avivp. 72
Taybehp. 73
Haifap. 75
The Gilboap. 77
Field Sites in the United Statesp. 78
Seeds of Peacep. 79
Hands of Peacep. 92
The Intervieweesp. 105
The Interview Procedurep. 108
Analytic Strategyp. 110
Stories
ôJewish in My Bloodö: Stories of Jewish-Israeli Youthp. 115
The Master Narrative of Jewish-Israeli Identityp. 116
An Introductionp. 116
Contestationsp. 118
Persecution and Victimizationp. 120
Existential Insecurityp. 122
Exceptionalismp. 124
Delegitimization of Palestinian Identityp. 125
Summaryp. 129
The Stories of Youthp. 130
Yossi: The Ambivalent Pragmatistp. 130
Noa: The Kibbutznikp. 137
Roai: The Settlerp. 142
Ayelet: The Cosmopolitanp. 147
Summary: The Cultural Psychology of Jewish-Israeli Youthp. 155
ôIt's Not a Normal Life We Leadö: The Stories of Palestinian Youthp. 159
The Master Narrative of Palestinian Identityp. 160
An Introductionp. 160
Contestationsp. 161
Loss and Dispossessionp. 161
Resistancep. 164
Existential Insecurityp. 168
Delegitimization of Israeli Identityp. 170
Summaryp. 173
The Stories of Youthp. 175
Ali: The Unlikely Islamistp. 175
Adara: The Pious Villagerp. 181
Luca: The Christian Fighterp. 189
Lubna: The Survivorp. 195
Summary: The Cultural Psychology of Palestinian Youthp. 201
ôI Had a War With Myselfö: Palestinian-Israeli Youth and the Narration of Hyphenated Identitiesp. 205
The Master Narrative of Palestinian-Israeli Identityp. 206
Discrimination and Subordinationp. 209
Hyphenation and ôDouble Marginalityöp. 211
Existential Insecurityp. 216
Summaryp. 220
The Stories of Youthp. 221
ôI am Israeli Firstö: The Story of Jibrilp. 221
ôI Had a War with Myselfö: The Story of Raniap. 230
ôI Am Divided Between the Twoö: The Story of Samip. 233
Summary: The Cultural Psychology of Palestinian-Israeli Youthp. 241
Interventions
Peace and the Politics of Contact: A Brief Historyp. 247
Contact: The Allure and Challengep. 247
The Pathology of Prejudicep. 250
The Normative Psychology of Prejudicep. 254
From Personality to Identityp. 256
Identity and the Cultural Psychology of Contactp. 259
The Idea of Israeli-Palestinian Contactp. 261
Contact, Narrative, and Identityp. 267
Restorying Self and Other: An American Experimentp. 269
The Synagogue and the Mosquep. 269
Identity Transcendencep. 271
ôI Had Never Even Spoken to an Arabö: The Story of Liatp. 273
ôI Have Been Changed a Lotö: The Story of Lailap. 276
ôMaybe They Are the Victim, the Real Victimö: The Story of Noap. 282
Summary: The Problem of Transcendencep. 285
Identity Accentuationp. 288
The Fatalist: The Story of Mohammedp. 289
The Settler: Revisiting the Story of Roaip. 297
The New Palestinian: Revisiting the Story of Jibrilp. 303
From Transcendence to Accentuation: An Analysis of Two Narratives Over Timep. 310
The Cosmopolitan: Revisiting the Story of Ayeletp. 310
The Realist: Revisiting the Story of Lailap. 317
Conclusion: Contact and Identityp. 321
Possibilities
Peace, Justice, and the Politics of Identity: Toward a New Praxisp. 327
A Virtual Dialoguep. 327
Ambitious Argumentsp. 331
Narrative and the Psychological Infrastructure of Conflictp. 334
Against Cosmopolitanismp. 342
American Intervention as a ôCivilizingö Projectp. 347
The Problem of Power and Social Structurep. 351
The Meaning of Contact: Toward a Cultural Approachp. 353
What's Wrong With Identity?p. 356
Psychology and the Politics of a New Praxis: From Interpretation to Social Changep. 359
Undisciplining the Disciplinep. 359
Politicizing Peacep. 363
Peril and Promise in Israeli and Palestinian Livesp. 366
Referencesp. 369
Indexp. 399
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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