Catalogue

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Whatever else happened to the Egyptians? : from the revolution to the age of globalization /
Galal Amin ; translated by David Wilmsen ; illustrations by Samir Abd al-Ghani.
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, c2004.
description
189 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
9774248198
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, c2004.
isbn
9774248198
contents note
The age of the mass society -- The July revolution and the age of the mass society -- Journalism -- Television -- The telephone -- Dress -- Romance -- Birthdays -- Culture -- The economy -- Rich and poor -- The circus -- A train journey -- The doctorate -- This world and the next.
catalogue key
7400822
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Wilmsen is director of the Arabic and Translation Studies Division at the Center for Adult and Continuing Education at the American University in Cairo.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work takes a look at the changes that have taken place in Egyptian society since the 1950s, and considers the disruptions brought about by the surge in population. It discusses how runaway population growth has effects on aspects of society and also predictable effects on the economy.
Main Description
At the time of the Egyptian Revolution in 1952, the population of Egypt was around 22 million. At the end of 2002, it stood at 69 million, and was growing at a rate of 1.33 million a year. What happens to a society that grows so quickly, when the habitable and cultivable land of the country is strictly limited? After the success of Whatever Happened to the Egyptians?, Galal Amin now takes a further bemused look at the changes that have taken place in Egyptian society over the past half century, this time considering the disruptions brought about by the surge in population. Basing his arguments on both academic research and his own personal experiences and impressions, and employing the same light humor and keen sense of empathy as in his earlier work, the author discusses how runaway population growth has not only profound effects on many aspects of society - from love and fashion to telephones, the supermarket, and religion - but also predictable effects on the economy.
Main Description
At the time of the Egyptian Revolution in 1952, the population of Egypt was around 22 million. At the end of 2002, it stood at 69 million, and was growing at a rate of 1.33 million a year. What happens to a society that grows so quickly, when the habitable and cultivable land of the country isstrictly limited? After the success of Whatever Happened to the Egyptians?, Galal Amin now takes a further bemused look at the changes that have taken place in Egyptian society over the past half century, this time considering the disruptions brought about by the surge in population. Basing his arguments on bothacademic research and his own personal experiences and impressions, and employing the same light humor and keen sense of empathy as in his earlier work, the author discusses how runaway population growth has not only profound effects on many aspects of society - from love and fashion to telephones,the supermarket, and religion - but also predictable effects on the economy.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Age of the Mass Society
The July Revolution and the Age of the Mass Society
Journalism Television
The Telephone
Dress
Romance
Birthdays
Culture
The Economy
Rich and Poor
The Circus
A Train Journey
The Doctorate
This World and the Next
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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