Catalogue

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Between Scylla and Charybdis : learned letter writers navigating the reefs of religious and political controversy in early modern Europe /
edited by Jeannine De Landtsheer & Henk Nellen.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
description
xxvi, 539 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004185739 (Cloth), 9789004185739 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
isbn
9004185739 (Cloth)
9789004185739 (Cloth)
general note
Papers from an international colloquium held in Leuven, Brussels, and The Hague, Dec. 14-16, 2006.
catalogue key
7400149
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This volume of essays provides a timely and valuable addition to scholarship on learned correspondence in the early modern period and is a very useful complement to the significant number of collections of letters now available online."Chris Joby, De Zeventiende Eeuw 28 (2012) 1,109-110"Between Scylla and Charybdis offers an impressively learned but lively, readable, and often moving depiction of how confessionalization impacted scholarly individuals, families, networks, and institutions as well as the relations of church and state in Early Modern Europe."Judith Rice Henderson, The University of Saskatchewan"The many case studies collected here render the volume interesting to students of humanist culture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, especially in the Netherlands, the Holy Roman Empire, England, and France.Nicolette Mout. In: Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, Nos. 2-3 (2012), pp. 401-403
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Summaries
Description for Reader
An academic readership interested in the history of political and religious ideas in Early Modern Europe, the Republic of Letters, and the history of epistolography.
Long Description
Early Modern letter-writing was often the only way to maintain regular and meaningful contact. Scholars, politicians, printers, and artists wrote to share private or professional news, to test new ideas, to support their friends, or pursue personal interests. Epistolary exchanges thus provide a private lens onto major political, religious, and scholarly events. Sixteenth century's reform movements created a sense of disorder, if not outright clashes and civil war. Scholars could not shy away from these tensions. The private sphere of letter-writing allowed them to express, or allude to, the conflicts of interest which arose from their studies, social status, and religious beliefs. Scholarly correspondences thus constitute an unparalleled source on the interrelation between broad historical developments and the convictions of a particularly expressive group of individuals.
Main Description
Early Modern letter-writing was often the only way to maintain regular and meaningful contact. Scholars, politicians, printers, and artists wrote to share private or professional news, to test new ideas, to support their friends, or pursue personal interests. Epistolary exchanges thus provide a private lens onto major political, religious, and scholarly events. Sixteenth century s reform movements created a sense of disorder, if not outright clashes and civil war. Scholars could not shy away from these tensions. The private sphere of letter-writing allowed them to express, or allude to, the conflicts of interest which arose from their studies, social status, and religious beliefs. Scholarly correspondences thus constitute an unparalleled source on the interrelation between broad historical developments and the convictions of a particularly expressive group of individuals.
Main Description
Scylla and Charybdisoffers a collection of studies on epistolary and scholarly responses to religious and political controversy in Early Modern Europe. Careful examination of key intellectual letter-writers yields new biographical information as well as a more balanced judgement on the ways they responded to the challenges of their time.

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