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Image ethics in Shakespeare and Spenser /
James A. Knapp.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xii, 231 p.
ISBN
0230108091 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780230108097 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230108091 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780230108097 (hbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: image ethics -- Harnessing the visual: from illustration to ekphrasis -- From visible to invisible: Spenser's Aprill and messianic ethics -- Looking for ethics in Spenser's Faerie queene -- "To look, but with another's eyes": translating vision in A midsummer night's dream -- The ethics of temporality in Measure for measure -- "Ocular proof" and the dangers of the perceptual faith -- "Disliken the truth of your own seeming": visual and ethical truth in The winter's tale.
catalogue key
7399694
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James A. Knapp is Associate Professor and Edward L. Surtz, S.J. Professor of Shakespeare and Textual Studies at Loyola University Chicago. He is the author of Illustrating the Past in Early Modern England: The Representation of History in Printed Books. His essays on Shakespeare, visual culture, and early modern literature have appeared in Shakespeare Quarterly, ELH, Criticism, and Poetics Today, as well as a variety of essay collections.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"More than any other book in recent Renaissance studies, Knapp's makes a convincing case for the need to return to the riches of phenomenology, not for the sake of making the Renaissance 'relevant' to contemporary debates (although he does this admirably), but so that we can see the convergence of both periods on basic questions about the body, sympathy, reason, and visionquestions that have occupied philosophical and religious discourse for a very long time."--Michael Witmore, Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison "Image Ethics in Shakespeare and Spenser represents a profound and thoughtful engagement with the drama of moral decision in Shakespeare and Spenser. Working with philosophical, theological, and scientific texts from both Renaissance letters and contemporary thought, Knapp movingly demonstrates the intimate role that mental and physical images play in an embedded and embodied ethics experienced in time. Throughout this book, Knapp reads Scripture not for dogmatic prescriptions but for phenomenological accounts of how we live and love through acts of looking."--Julia Reinhard Lupton, The University of California, Irvine
“More than any other book in recent Renaissance studies, Knapp’s makes a convincing case for the need to return to the riches of phenomenology, not for the sake of making the Renaissance ‘relevant’ to contemporary debates (although he does this admirably), but so that we can see the convergence of both periods on basic questions about the body, sympathy, reason, and vision-questions that have occupied philosophical and religious discourse for a very long time.”--Michael Witmore, Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison “Image Ethics in Shakespeare and Spenser represents a profound and thoughtful engagement with the drama of moral decision in Shakespeare and Spenser. Working with philosophical, theological, and scientific texts from both Renaissance letters and contemporary thought, Knapp movingly demonstrates the intimate role that mental and physical images play in an embedded and embodied ethics experienced in time. Throughout this book, Knapp reads Scripture not for dogmatic prescriptions but for phenomenological accounts of how we live and love through acts of looking.”--Julia Reinhard Lupton, The University of California, Irvine
"More than any other book in recent Renaissance studies, Knapp's makes a convincing case for the need to return to the riches of phenomenology, not for the sake of making the Renaissance 'relevant' to contemporary debates (although he does this admirably), but so that we can see the convergence of both periods on basic questions about the body, sympathy, reason and vision questions that have occupied philosophical and religious discourse for a very long time."--Michael Witmore, Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison "Image Ethics represents a profound and thoughtful engagement with the drama of moral decision in Shakespeare and Spenser. Working with philosophical, theological and scientific texts from both Renaissance letters and contemporary thought, James Knapp movingly demonstrates the intimate role that mental and physical images play in an embedded and embodied ethics experienced in time. Throughout this book, Kanpp reads Scripture not for dogmatic prescriptions but for phenomenological accounts of how we live and love through acts of looking."--Julia Reinhard Lupton, The University of California, Irvine
"More than any other book in recent Renaissance studies, Knapp's makes a convincing case for the need to return to the riches of phenomenology, not for the sake of making the Renaissance 'relevant' to contemporary debates (although he does this admirably), but so that we can see the convergence of both periods on basic questions about the body, sympathy, reason and vision questions that have occupied philosophical and religious discourse for a very long time."--Michael Witmore, Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison "Image Ethicsrepresents a profound and thoughtful engagement with the drama of moral decision in Shakespeare and Spenser. Working with philosophical, theological and scientific texts from both Renaissance letters and contemporary thought, James Knapp movingly demonstrates the intimate role that mental and physical images play in an embedded and embodied ethics experienced in time. Throughout this book, Kanpp reads Scripture not for dogmatic prescriptions but for phenomenological accounts of how we live and love through acts of looking."--Julia Reinhard Lupton, The University of California, Irvine
“More than any other book in recent Renaissance studies, Knapp’s makes a convincing case for the need to return to the riches of phenomenology, not for the sake of making the Renaissance ‘relevant’ to contemporary debates (although he does this admirably), but so that we can see the convergence of both periods on basic questions about the body, sympathy, reason and vision - questions that have occupied philosophical and religious discourse for a very long time.”--Michael Witmore, Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison“Image Ethicsrepresents a profound and thoughtful engagement with the drama of moral decision in Shakespeare and Spenser. Working with philosophical, theological and scientific texts from both Renaissance letters and contemporary thought, James Knapp movingly demonstrates the intimate role that mental and physical images play in an embedded and embodied ethics experienced in time. Throughout this book, Kanpp reads Scripture not for dogmatic prescriptions but for phenomenological accounts of how we live and love through acts of looking.”--Julia Reinhard Lupton, The University of California, Irvine
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Focusing on key works by Shakespeare and Spenser, this study shows the connection between visuality and ethical action in early modern English literature
Main Description
Focusing on works by Shakespeare and Spenser, this study shows the connection between visuality and ethical action in early modern English literature. James A. Knapp places early modern debates about the value of visual experience into dialogue with subsequent philosophical and ethical efforts.
Main Description
Image Ethics in Shakespeare and Spenser is a study of the connection between visuality and ethical action in early modern English literature. Focusing on works by Shakespeare and Spenser, this book details varying attitudes toward the development of ethical human subjectivity at a moment when basic assumptions about perception and knowledge were breaking down. Knapp places early modern debates over the value of visual experience in determinations of truth and ethical action into dialog with subsequent (and on-going) philosophical efforts to articulate an ethics that accounts for visual experience.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Image Ethicsp. 1
Harnessing the Visual: From Illustration to Ekphrasisp. 31
From Visible to Invisible: Spenser's "Aprill" and Messianic Ethicsp. 47
Looking for Ethics in Spenser's Faerie Queenep. 67
"To Look, but with Another's Eyes": Translating Vision in A Midsummer Night's Dreamp. 99
The Ethics of Temporality in Measure for Measurep. 121
"Ocular Proof" and the Dangers of the Perceptual Faithp. 143
"Disliken the Truth of Your Own Seeming": Visual and Ethical Truth in The Winter's Talep. 161
Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 215
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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