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Alta California : peoples in motion, identities in formation, 1769-1850 /
edited by Steven W. Hackel.
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : Published for Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West by University of California Press, Berkeley, California, and Huntington Library, San Marino, California, c2010.
description
vii, 357 p.
ISBN
0873282426 (cloth), 9780873282420 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
series title
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : Published for Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West by University of California Press, Berkeley, California, and Huntington Library, San Marino, California, c2010.
isbn
0873282426 (cloth)
9780873282420 (cloth)
catalogue key
7398844
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-08-01:
In the current economic environment, the likelihood that a collection of articles such as those under review will be published in book format will become increasingly rare. Yet, whether seeing the light of day as a book or in a scholarly journal, the essays in Alta California merit attention from scholars of the Spanish borderlands and those interested in the early history of modern-day California. Drawing together contributions from established as well as younger scholars such as Rose Marie Beebe, Robert M. Senkewicz, Jose Refugio de la Torre Curiel, Lisbeth Haas, James A. Sandos, Louise Publos, John R. Johnson, Joseph G. Lorenz, Albert L. Hurtado, David J. Weber, and Sylvia L. Hilton, these essays roam widely over the interactions between the Spanish missions and their indigenous parishioners. Particularly interesting are the number-crunching studies arising from the data produced by the Early California Population Project. Also intriguing is the pioneer work using DNA studies of current Californios who can trace their ancestry back to specific missions. The concluding essays dealing with the evolving historiography of Spanish and Mexican California will find an audience among students of this period. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. J. A. Lewis Western Carolina University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Through innovative methodologies and extensive archival research, the nine essays in this volume reshape our understanding of how people in the northernmost Spanish Borderlands viewed themselves and remade their worlds.
Main Description
Spanish California--with its diverse mix of Indians, soldiers, settlers, and missionaries--provides a fascinating site for the investigation of individual and collective identity in colonial America. Through innovative methodologies and extensive archival research, the nine essays in this volume reshape our understanding of how people in the northernmost Spanish Borderlands viewed themselves and remade their worlds. Essays examine Franciscan identity and missionary tactics in California, Sonora, and the Sierra Gorda; Spanish and Mexican settlers' identity as revealed in the life of Pablo Tac, among the most literate of Alta California's Indians; and mission choral guilds. The last section of the book turns to the historiography of the Spanish Borderlands as it has developed over the last century in North America as well as in Spain.

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