Catalogue


Popular politics in the history of South Africa, 1400-1948 /
Paul S. Landau.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xvi, 300 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0521196035 (hardback), 9780521196031 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521196035 (hardback)
9780521196031 (hardback)
contents note
Preface. The birth of the political -- 1. Eyewitness engagements : (Highveld political discourse at the start of the 1800s) -- 2. History before tribes : (partnership, alliance, and power -- 3. Translations : (missionaries and the invention of Christianity) -- 4. The incipient order : (Morok's reign, 1828-1880) -- 5. Mixed people : (the Samuelites, The Griqua, and other subjectivities, 1880-1928) -- 6. Twentieth-century tribes.
abstract
"Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 1400-1948 offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, to the dawn of Apartheid. A practical tradition of mobilization, alliance, and amalgamation persisted, mutated, and occasionally vanished from view; it survived against the odds in several forms, in tribalisms, Christian assemblies, and other, seemingly hybrid movements; and it continues today. Landau treats southern Africa broadly, concentrating increasingly on the southern highveld and ultimately focusing on a transnational movement called the "Samuelites." He shows how people's politics in South Africa were suppressed and transformed, but never entirely eliminated"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7394589
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-06-01:
Landau's challenging and provocative book focuses on political processes in South Africa's southern highveld region over the past 500 years. The author argues that the ancestors of contemporary Coloured, Sotho, and Tswana peoples favored a flexible, adaptable, political tradition with hybridity at its core. While centralized chiefdoms constituted the most common political organization prior to the late 19th century in this borderlands region, strategic alliances and partnerships also prevailed during less stable times. According to Landau (Univ. of Maryland), tribal distinctions did not appear until Western missionaries, colonial administrators, and professional ethnographers brought their cultural preoccupations and discursive practices to the region. The proletarianization, material dispossession, and erosion of chiefly authority that resulted from the Western impact served to weaken hybridity and strengthen ethnicity. As a result, tribalism, which had not been a feature of the pre-conquest era, gradually gained currency. As Landau argues, "by the end of the 1870s ... it is not that highveld people were being detribalized in missions and Boer farms, nor industrial work sites. They were tribalized in those places." Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. O. Gump University of San Diego
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Paul Landau uses his linguistic genius to probe the meaning of ethnicity and tribal affiliations in South Africa. His investigation revolutionizes our understanding of the past for all of Africa south of the Zambezi. Textbooks will need rewriting, starting now." Norman Etherington, University of Western Australia
'Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 14001948 is original and thought-provoking. Landau makes the important argument that the idea of entrenched ethnic identities was a product of the period of European colonialism and that a very different set of political assumptions had long animated regional politics. Landau similarly rethinks the meaning and uses of Christianity in exciting and innovative ways. Telling gripping and often moving tales, he demonstrates remarkable erudition, drawing on original sources in several languages and ranging widely in his research. This is a terrific book.' Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University
"Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 14001948 is original and thought-provoking. Landau makes the important argument that the idea of entrenched ethnic identities was a product of the period of European colonialism and that a very different set of political assumptions had long animated regional politics. Landau similarly rethinks the meaning and uses of Christianity in exciting and innovative ways. Telling gripping and often moving tales, he demonstrates remarkable erudition, drawing on original sources in several languages and ranging widely in his research. This is a terrific book." Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University
"Popular Politics in the History of South Africa is an intervention that deserves attention from an audience far beyond historians of South Africa and one that promises, fittingly for readers of Safundi, new directions in comparative colonial studies." -Lindsay Frederick Braun,University of Oregon
"This is a greatly ambitious and remarkably successful book. Landau has confronted most of the challenges now facing southern African historians and proposed resolutions to them. We now see that 'tribe' and 'ethnicity' are constructs dating from no earlier than the nineteenth century. For the first time Landau asks what forms of consciousness and organization preceded them. Landau takes his stand in the highveld, reaching out both north and south. His book will have to be taken account of by every southern Africanist." Terence Ranger, Oxford University
Advance praise: 'Paul Landau's masterful work opens up fresh lines of research by ambitiously narrating the history of South Africa's southern highveld, beginning with its peopling and earliest settlements and carrying the story through to African social movements in the early twentieth century. He challenges scholars to rethink how they write the history of southern Africa.' Robert R. Edgar, Howard University
"Paul Landau's masterful work opens up fresh lines of research by ambitiously narrating the history of South Africa's southern highveld, beginning with its peopling and earliest settlements and carrying the story through to African social movements in the early twentieth century. He challenges scholars to rethink how they write the history of southern Africa." Robert R. Edgar, Howard University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 1400-1948 offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, and up to the dawn of Apartheid. A tradition of mobilization, alliance, and amalgamation was eclipsed, misrepresented, and partially reconfigured as tribalism; yet it survived against the odds in several forms, including in Christian movements, and it continues today. Landau treats southern Africa broadly, with an increased concentration on the southern highveld, and an ultimate focus on a particular transnational movement called the "Samuelites," in order to show how people's politics in South Africa were translated and transformed, but never entirely suppressed.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, and up to the dawn of apartheid.
Description for Bookstore
Offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, and up to the dawn of apartheid.
Description for Bookstore
Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 1400-1948 offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, and up to the dawn of Apartheid.
Main Description
Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 14001948 offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, to the dawn of Apartheid. A practical tradition of mobilization, alliance, and amalgamation persisted, mutated, and occasionally vanished from view; it survived against the odds in several forms, in tribalisms, Christian assemblies, and other, seemingly hybrid movements; and it continues today. Landau treats southern Africa broadly, concentrating increasingly on the southern highveld and ultimately focusing on a transnational movement called the 'Samuelites'. He shows how people's politics in South Africa were suppressed and transformed, but never entirely eliminated.
Main Description
Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 1400–1948 offers an inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, to the dawn of Apartheid. A practical tradition of mobilization, alliance, and amalgamation persisted, mutated, and occasionally vanished from view; it survived against the odds in several forms, in tribalisms, Christian assemblies, and other, seemingly hybrid movements; and it continues today. Landau treats southern Africa broadly, concentrating increasingly on the southern Highveld and ultimately focusing on a transnational movement called the 'Samuelites'. He shows how people's politics in South Africa were suppressed and transformed, but never entirely eliminated.
Main Description
Popular Politics in the History of South Africa, 1400-1948 offers a newly inclusive vision of South Africa's past. Drawing largely from original sources, Paul Landau presents a history of the politics of the country's people, from the time of their early settlements in the elevated heartlands, through the colonial era, to the dawn of Apartheid. A practical tradition of mobilization, alliance, and amalgamation persisted, mutated, and occasionally vanished from view; it survived against the odds in several forms, in tribalisms, Christian assemblies, and other, seemingly hybrid movements; and it continues today. Landau treats southern Africa broadly, concentrating increasingly on the southern highveld and ultimately focusing on a transnational movement called the "Samuelites." He shows how people's politics in South Africa were suppressed and transformed, but never entirely eliminated.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
Preface: The Birth of the Politicalp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Eyewitness Engagements (Highveld political discourse at the start of the 1800s)p. 1
History before Tribes (Partnership, alliance, and power)p. 42
Translations (Missionaries and the invention of Christianity)p. 74
The Incipient Order (Moroka's reign, 1828-1880)p. 108
Mixed People (The Samuelites, the Griqua, and other subjectivities, 1880-1928)p. 162
Twentieth-Century Tribesp. 214
Primary and Archival Sourcesp. 251
Bibliographyp. 257
Indexp. 285
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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