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The landscape archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England /
edited by Nicholas J. Higham and Martin J. Ryan.
imprint
Woodbridge, [N.Y.] : Boydell Press, 2010.
description
231 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9781843835820 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Woodbridge, [N.Y.] : Boydell Press, 2010.
isbn
9781843835820 (hbk.)
general note
"This volume is one of a pair to emerge from a conference on the Landscape of Anglo-Saxon England hosted in 2007 by the Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies ... "--p. [1].
catalogue key
7393841
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Anglo-Saxon period was crucial to the development of the English landscape, but is rarely studied. This collection of essays provide radical new interpretations of its development.
Main Description
Traditional opinion has perceived the Anglo-Saxons as creating an entirely new landscape from scratch in the fifth and sixth centuries AD, cutting down woodland, and bringing with them the practice of open field agriculture, and establishing villages. Whilst recent scholarship has proved this simplistic picture wanting, it has also raised many questions about the nature of landscape development at the time, the changing nature of systems of land management, and strategies for settlement. The papers here seek to shed new light on these complex issues. Taking a variety of different approaches, and with topics ranging from the impact of coppicing to medieval field systems, from the representation of the landscape in manuscripts to cereal production and the type of bread the population preferred, they offer striking new approaches to the central issues of landscape change across the seven centuries of Anglo-Saxon England, a period surely foundational to the rural landscape of today.BR>Nicholas J. Higham is Professor of Early Medieval and Landscape History at the University of Manchester; Martin J. Ryan lectures in Medieval History at the University of Manchester. Contributors: Nicholas J. Higham, Christopher Grocock, Stephen Rippon, Stuart Brookes, Carenza Lewis, Susan Oosthuizen, Tom Williamson, Catherine Karkov, David Hill, Debby Banham, Richard Hoggett, Peter Murphy.
Main Description
Traditional opinion has perceived the Anglo-Saxons as creating an entirely new landscape from scratch in the fifth and sixth centuries AD, cutting down woodland, bringing with them the practice of open field agriculture, and establishing villages. Whilst recent scholarship has proved this simplistic picture wanting, it has also raised many questions about the nature of landscape development at the time, the changing nature of systems of land management, and strategies for settlement. The papers here seek to shed new light on these complex issues. Taking a variety of different approaches, and with topics ranging from the impact of coppicing to medieval field systems, from the representation of the landscape in manuscripts to cereal production and the type of bread the population preferred, they offer striking new approaches to the central issues of landscape change across the seven centuries of Anglo-Saxon England. Contributors: Nicholas J. Higham, Christopher Grocock, Stephen Rippon, Stuart Brookes, Carenza Lewis, Susan Oosthuizen, Tom Williamson, Catherine Karkov, David Hill, Debby Banham, Richard Hoggett, Peter Murphy.
Unpaid Annotation
The Anglo-Saxon period was crucial to the development of the English landscape, but is rarely studied. The essays here provide radical new interpretations of its development.

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