Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Carnal knowledge and imperial power : race and the intimate in colonial rule /
Ann Laura Stoler ; with a new preface.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
description
xxxv, 335 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0520262468 (pbk.), 9780520262461 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
isbn
0520262468 (pbk.)
9780520262461 (pbk.)
catalogue key
7388097
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 285-317) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ann Laura Stoler is Willy Brandt Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology and Historical Studies at The New School for Social Research. She is the author of Race and the Education of Desire and coeditor of Tensions of Empire: Colonial Cultures in a Bourgeois World (UC Press).
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Praise for the first edition ofCarnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: "Comprehensive, erudite, and compelling."--Journal of Modern History "Stoler presents a groundbreaking work that emanates from her empirical investigations of the European colonial experiences in Asia of the 19th and early 20th centuries. At the same time, she engages with cutting-edge discussions advanced by postcolonial theorist. . .."--Choice "Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Poweris a compelling text, its dense analysis made accessible and almost visceral by the historical ethnography and scholarly detail. . .the book offers a rich and intricate account of the imperial project at work and strikes a difficult balance between theory, history, and ethnography in its analysis."--Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Flap Copy
Praise for the first edition of Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power : "Comprehensive, erudite, and compelling."-- Journal of Modern History "Stoler presents a groundbreaking work that emanates from her empirical investigations of the European colonial experiences in Asia of the 19th and early 20th centuries. At the same time, she engages with cutting-edge discussions advanced by postcolonial theorists in recent years. By introducing the issues of race, sexuality, and intimacy into the study of colonialism, or the interactions of Europeans with the indigenous populations in their households and in their personal or sex lives, Stoler offers a fresh look at the European colonial experience, in which the line between the colonizers and the colonized becomes significantly blurred. This 'blurring,' or hybridity, is, of course, an important issue in postcolonial theory, yet Stoler's presentation reveals that this hybridity is not only a theoretical question, but also (though largely absent from the extant scholarship) a reflection of historical reality. Stoler shows that hybridization took place at the personal, quotidian level, where the Europeans interacted actively with the natives, and in the economic arena, where impoverished Europeans were forced to compete with locals for a good living in 'their' colonies. An eye-opening book. . .. Highly recommended."-- Choice " Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power is a compelling text, its dense analysis made accessible and almost visceral by the historical ethnography and scholarly detail. . .the book offers a rich and intricate account of the imperial project at work and strikes a difficult balance between theory, history, and ethnography in its analysis."-- Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Flap Copy
Praise for the first edition ofCarnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: "Comprehensive, erudite, and compelling."--Journal of Modern History "Stoler presents a groundbreaking work that emanates from her empirical investigations of the European colonial experiences in Asia of the 19th and early 20th centuries. At the same time, she engages with cutting-edge discussions advanced by postcolonial theorists in recent years. By introducing the issues of race, sexuality, and intimacy into the study of colonialism, or the interactions of Europeans with the indigenous populations in their households and in their personal or sex lives, Stoler offers a fresh look at the European colonial experience, in which the line between the colonizers and the colonized becomes significantly blurred. This 'blurring,' or hybridity, is, of course, an important issue in postcolonial theory, yet Stoler's presentation reveals that this hybridity is not only a theoretical question, but also (though largely absent from the extant scholarship) a reflection of historical reality. Stoler shows that hybridization took place at the personal, quotidian level, where the Europeans interacted actively with the natives, and in the economic arena, where impoverished Europeans were forced to compete with locals for a good living in 'their' colonies. An eye-opening book. . .. Highly recommended."--Choice "Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Poweris a compelling text, its dense analysis made accessible and almost visceral by the historical ethnography and scholarly detail. . .the book offers a rich and intricate account of the imperial project at work and strikes a difficult balance between theory, history, and ethnography in its analysis."--Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-04-01:
Stoler (Univ. of Michigan) presents a groundbreaking work that emanates from her empirical investigations of the European colonial experiences in Asia of the 19th and early 20th centuries. At the same time, she engages with cutting-edge discussions advanced by postcolonial theorists in recent years. By introducing the issues of race, sexuality, and intimacy into the study of colonialism, or the interactions of Europeans with the indigenous population in their households and in their personal or sex lives, Stoler offers a fresh look at the European colonial experience, in which the line between the colonizers and the colonized becomes significantly blurred. This "blurring," or hybridity, is, of course, an important issue in postcolonial theory, yet Stoler's presentation reveals that this hybridity is not only a theoretical question, but also (though largely absent from extant scholarship) a reflection of historical reality. Stoler shows that hybridization took place at the personal, quotidian level, where the Europeans interacted actively with the natives, and in the economic arena, where impoverished Europeans were forced to compete with locals for a good living in "their" colonies. An eye-opening book. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. Q. E. Wang Rowan University
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Looking at the way cultural competencies and sensibilities entered into the construction of race in the colonial context, this text proposes that 'cultural racism' in fact predates its postmodern discovery.
Main Description
This landmark book tracks matters of intimacy to investigate matters of state in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Indonesia, particularly the critical role played by sexual arrangements and affective attachments in creating colonial categories and distinguishing the ruler from the ruled. Arguing that social classification is not a benign cultural act but a potent political one, Ann Laura Stoler's essays focus on parents and parenting, nursing mothers, servants, orphanages, and abandoned children to reveal why they were understood as so essential to imperial governance and why they have been so consistently absent from its historiography. In a new preface, Stoler takes up a broad range of problematics raised in the first edition, including the analytics of comparison, the treatment of the intimate, and more.
Main Description
This landmark book tracks matters of intimacy to investigate matters of state in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Indonesia, particularly the critical role played by sexual arrangements and affective attachments in creating colonial categories and distinguishing the ruler from the ruled. Arguing that social classification is not a benign cultural act but a potent political one, Ann Laura Stoler's essays focus on parents and parenting, nursing mothers, servants, orphanages, and abandoned children to reveal why they were understood as so essential to imperial governance and why they have been so consistently absent from its historiography. In a new preface, Stoler takes up a broad range of problematics raised in the first edition, including the analytics of comparison, the treatment of the intimate, and our reading of colonial documents and the displaced histories folded within them. She explores how these issues bear on our treatment of colonial pasts, the debris they leave behind, and how we might think differently about the intimate frontiers of imperial formations in the colonial and post-colonial present.
Table of Contents
Preface to the 2010 Edition: Zones of the Intimate in Imperial Formationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xxxiii
Note on Illustrationsp. xxxv
Genealogies of the Intimate: Movements in Colonial Studiesp. 1
Rethinking Colonial Categories: European Communities and the Boundaries of Rulep. 22
Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: Gender and Morality in the Making of Racep. 41
Sexual Affronts and Racial Frontiers: Cultural Competence and the Dangers of M├ętissagep. 79
A Sentimental Education: Children on the Imperial Dividep. 112
A Colonial Reading of Foucault: Bourgeois Bodies and Racial Selvesp. 140
Memory-Work in Java: A Cautionary Talep. 162
Epilogue. Caveats on Comfort Zones and Comparative Framesp. 205
Notesp. 219
Bibliographyp. 285
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem