Catalogue

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Grass in their mouths : the Upper Doab of India under the Company's Magna Charta, 1793-1830 /
by Dirk H.A. Kolff.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2010.
description
xiv, 647 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
900418502X (hbk. : acid-free paper), 9789004185029 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2010.
isbn
900418502X (hbk. : acid-free paper)
9789004185029 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
contents note
The Cornwallis system and the colonial executive -- The Gujars of the Upper Doab -- A change of system in Merath -- Beyond rules and regulations : Dehra Dun under Frederick Shore -- How the Landhaura riyāsat was dissected -- Lawlessness and legal plunder in Saharanpur.
catalogue key
7383938
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'If one accepts this limitation (this being a work of administrative history), one can praise Kolff's work as a unique contribution to modern Indian historiography. Hardly any other work has provided such deep insights into the interaction of British and Indian agency in the early period of colonial rule.'Dietmar Rothermund, Orientalische Literaturzeitung
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The core of this title consists of superbly-detailed studies of the ways in which, in the Ganges-Jumna doab, villagers, revenue farmers, Indian policemen and revenue officials, bankers and judges struggled to overcome or profit from this feature of the colonial administration.
Description for Reader
All those interested in Indian social and administrative history, colonialism and its ideologies, peasant studies, and Indian legal studies.
Main Description
Scholarship on the pre-Bentinck period of Indian history has taken little notice of the inevitable dilemmas of colonial rule as they became visible in the districts. This book argues that the disdain the eighteenth-century Westminster parliaments expressed both for Indians and the East India Company induced the Bengal civil service to formulate for itself a corporate identity that, because of its distant and self-centered character, prevented it to acquire an executive hold on most levels of the Indian administration. The core of the book consists of superbly-detailed studies of the ways in which, in the Ganges-Jumna doab, villagers, revenue farmers, Indian policemen and revenue officials, bankers and judges struggled to overcome or profit from this feature of the colonial administration.
Main Description
The core of the book consists of superbly-detailed studies of how, on a frontier of colonial India, village leaders, Indian policemen and revenue officials, bankers and judges confronted, survived, or profited from the system imposed upon them in 1793.

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