Catalogue


Roman Egypt /
Livia Capponi.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
London : Bristol Classical Press, 2011.
description
89 p. : ill., map, plan ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1853997269, 9781853997266
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Bristol Classical Press, 2011.
isbn
1853997269
9781853997266
abstract
This title offers a first approach to the subject, presenting a survey of the most important aspects of life in Egypt under Roman domination, from the conquest by Octavian in 30 BC to the third century AD.
catalogue key
7379446
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Capponi (ancient history, Newcastle U.) presents an introduction to Roman Egypt (Egypt became a Roman territory in 30 BC after it was conquered by Octavian and remained in Roman control until the third century AD)for high school students or undergraduates with no prior knowledge of the Classical world. He covers the conquest, forms of Roman exploitation, Byzantine Egypt and the end of Roman rule, cultural and social issues, Alexandria, Oxyrhynchus, and the Papyri. A map of Roman Egypt, a chronology and list of suggested further reading are included.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, April 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title offers a first approach to the subject, presenting a survey of the most important aspects of life in Egypt under Roman domination, from the conquest by Octavian in 30 BC to the third century AD.
Main Description
Egypt is by far the best-documented province of the Roman Empire. The dryness of its climate means that an enormous number of literary and documentary papyri have survived ' a unique, reliable and lively source that documents Egypt in more detail than any other Roman province. Hitherto these have not been used extensively by Roman historians, on the erroneous assumption that Egypt is somehow 'atypical' as a Roman province. However, scholars now agree that Egypt should be devoted more attention by anyone interested in the history of the Roman Empire. This book offers a first approach to the subject, presenting a survey of the most important aspects of life in the province under Roman domination, from the conquest by Octavian in 30 BC to the 3rd century AD, as they emerge from the micro-level of the Egyptian papyri and inscriptions, but also from the ancient literary sources, such as Strabo, Diodorus and Philo, and from the most important archaeological discoveries.
Main Description
Egypt is by far the best-documented province of the Roman Empire. The dryness of its climate means that an enormous number of literary and documentary papyri have survived “ a unique, reliable and lively source that documents Egypt in more detail than any other Roman province. Hitherto these have not been used extensively by Roman historians, on the erroneous assumption that Egypt is somehow atypical " as a Roman province. However, scholars now agree that Egypt should be devoted more attention by anyone interested in the history of the Roman Empire. This book offers a first approach to the subject, presenting a survey of the most important aspects of life in the province under Roman domination, from the conquest by Octavian in 30 BC to the 3rd century AD, as they emerge from the micro-level of the Egyptian papyri and inscriptions, but also from the ancient literary sources, such as Strabo, Diodorus and Philo, and from the most important archaeological discoveries.
Main Description
Egypt is by far the best-documented province of the Roman Empire. The dryness of its climate means that an enormous number of literary and documentary papyri have survived a unique, reliable and lively source that documents Egypt in more detail than any other Roman province. Hitherto these have not been used extensively by Roman historians, on the erroneous assumption that Egypt is somehow 'atypical' as a Roman province. However, scholars now agree that Egypt should be devoted more attention by anyone interested in the history of the Roman Empire. This book offers a first approach to the subject, presenting a survey of the most important aspects of life in the province under Roman domination, from the conquest by Octavian in 30 BC to the 3rd century AD, as they emerge from the micro-level of the Egyptian papyri and inscriptions, but also from the ancient literary sources, such as Strabo, Diodorus and Philo, and from the most important archaeological discoveries.
Main Description
Egypt is by far the best-documented province of the Roman Empire. The dryness of its climate means that an enormous number of literary and documentary papyri have survived - a unique, reliable and lively source that documents Egypt in more detail than any other Roman province. Hitherto these have not been used extensively by Roman historians, on the erroneous assumption that Egypt is somehow 'atypical' as a Roman province. However, scholars now agree that Egypt should be devoted more attention by anyone interested in the history of the Roman Empire. This book offers a first approach to the subject, presenting a survey of the most important aspects of life in the province under Roman domination, from the conquest by Octavian in 30 BC to the third century AD, as they emerge from the micro-level of the Egyptian papyri and inscriptions, but also from the ancient literary sources, such as Strabo, Diodorus, and Philo, and from the most important archaeological discoveries.

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