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Albert Camus as political thinker : nihilisms and the politics of contempt /
Samantha Novello.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
x, 193 p.
ISBN
0230240984 (hardback), 9780230240988 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230240984 (hardback)
9780230240988 (hardback)
catalogue key
7379082
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Samantha Novello is a teacher of Philosophy and Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Turin, Italy. She is co-editor of the new edition of Albert Camus's complete works in the Bibliothque de la Pliade.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-06-01:
"Nihilisms" in the subtitle is no misprint: Camus opposed the famously unsettling nihilism of Meursault to what he and his protagonist alike regarded as the nihilism of modern societies. Novello (Univ. of Torino, Italy) brings to her study a rare intimacy with Camusian thought. She rediscovers his first philosophic teacher, Jean Grenier, who introduced his student to the writings of Nietzsche and Max Scheler, who in their turn convinced Camus that the then-rampant tyrannies of fascism and communism originated in "the nihilistic logic of modernity." Modern philosophy, they argued, makes all beings, including human beings, instruments for the achievement of domination over nature by men who dehumanize themselves as they strive for that domination. Camus opposed a democratized form of Nietzsche's philosophy of creativity, one that replaced Nietzsche's planetary aristocracy with syndicalist communalism as the best political response to that cold monster, the modern state. She states that "[t]he ambition of this book is to be a book of philosophy ... on an artist." The book may not be as untimely as that; Novello's Camus is a thinker rather at home in contemporary academic postmodernism. More modestly conceived as an instructive work of scholarship, it immediately takes a place of distinction. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. W. Morrisey Hillsdale College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a genealogical reconstruction of Camus's political thinking challenging the philosophical import of his writings as providing an alternative understanding of politics, political action & freedom outside & against the nihilistic categories of modern political philosophy & the contemporary politics of contempt & terrorisms.
Description for Bookstore
An engaging investigation into an 'aesthetic way of thinking politics and political action outside and against the 20th century nihilistic 'politics of contempt''
Long Description
This intense 'genealogical' reconstruction of Albert Camus's political thinking challenges the philosophical import of his writings as providing an alternative, 'aesthetic' way of thinking political action outside and against the nihilistic categories of modern political philosophy. Samantha Novello focuses on the problem of radical nihilism as a crucial political question and the red thread of Camus's reflection from his early works to his speech for acceptance upon the Award of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Based on the most rigorous and updated edition of his complete works in the new Bibliothèque de la Pléiade (Gallimard), the book discusses all the key concepts of Camus's thinking, including the absurd, revolt, and freedom, in the light of contemporary political theory and as part of his personal/original 'aesthetic' point of view on twentieth-century politics of contempt and terrorisms.
Long Description
This is an intense 'genealogical' reconstruction of Albert Camus's political thinking that challenges the philosophical import of his writings as providing an alternative, 'aesthetic' way of thinking political action outside and against the nihilistic categories of modern political philosophy. Samantha Novello focuses on the problem of radical nihilism as a crucial political question and the red thread of Camus's reflection from his early works to his speech for acceptance upon the Award of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Based on the most rigorous and updated philological reconstruction of his complete works in the new edition of Bibliothèque de la Pliéiade (Gallimard), the book discusses all the key concepts of Camus's thinking, including the absurd, revolt, and freedom as part of his wider 'aesthetic' point of view on the 20th century 'politics of contempt' and terrorisms, and also situated in the context of contemporary political theory.
Main Description
An intense genealogicalreconstruction of Camus's political thinking challenging the philosophical import of his writings as providing an alternative, aestheticunderstanding of politics, political action and freedom outside and against the nihilistic categories of modern political philosophy and the contemporary politics of contemptand terrorisms
Main Description
An intensegenealogicalreconstruction of Camus’s political thinking challenging the philosophical import of his writings as providing an alternative,aestheticunderstanding of politics, political action and freedom outside and against the nihilistic categories of modern political philosophy and the contemporarypolitics of contemptand terrorisms
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Note on the Texts and Abbreviationsp. ix
Introduction: An 'Untimely' Political Thought for Serious Timesp. 1
The Twentieth-Century Politics of Contemptp. 10
'Undisguised influences'p. 19
Tragic Beginningsp. 33
Mystic 'communion' with naturep. 38
An Artist's Point of Viewp. 58
Rethinking participation beyond political 'romanticism'p. 63
A stranger to the world of ressentimentp. 71
Commencement of Freedomp. 81
Sisyphus or happiness in Hellp. 86
Nothing is possible, everything is permittedp. 92
The Absurd and Powerp. 109
Combat with nihilismp. 122
Between Sade and the Dandy. Conclusionp. 131
Notesp. 148
Bibliographyp. 174
Indexp. 186
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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