Catalogue

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Zen and Japanese culture /
Daisetz T. Suzuki ; with a new introduction by Richard M. Jaffe.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 2010.
description
xlv, 478 p., [66] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0691144621 (pbk.), 9780691144627 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 2010.
isbn
0691144621 (pbk.)
9780691144627 (pbk.)
general note
1st English translation published in 1959.
abstract
'Zen and Japanese Culture' is one of the 20th century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution.
catalogue key
7374452
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [443]-447) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daisetz T. Suzuki (1870-1966) was Japan's foremost authority on Zen Buddhism and the author of more than one hundred books on the subject.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Praise for Princeton's previous editions: "As one turns the pages of this delightful book, one seems to catch intimations of how and why certain aspects of the "spirit of Zen' are making themselves felt in America today. . . .
Praise for Princeton's previous editions: "As one turns the pages of this delightful book, one seems to catch intimations of how and why certain aspects of the "spirit of Zen' are making themselves felt in America today. . . . -- The New York Times
Praise for Princetons previous editions: "As one turns the pages of this delightful book, one seems to catch intimations of how and why certain aspects of the "spirit of Zen' are making themselves felt in America today. . . ."-- The New York Times
Praise for Princeton's previous editions: "[In] Dr. Suzuki's beautiful book, . . . the cults of tea, sword, archery, garden, painting, handwriting are shown as separate petals of that precious efflorescence which, in spite of history, madness and the disturbed surface of the tangible world, are celebrated today, inside and outside of many golden pavilions.
Praise for Princeton's previous editions: "[In] Dr. Suzuki's beautiful book, . . . the cults of tea, sword, archery, garden, painting, handwriting are shown as separate petals of that precious efflorescence which, in spite of history, madness and the disturbed surface of the tangible world, are celebrated today, inside and outside of many golden pavilions. -- Lincoln Kirstein, The Nation
Praise for Princetons previous editions: "[In] Dr. Suzukis beautiful book, . . . the cults of tea, sword, archery, garden, painting, handwriting are shown as separate petals of that precious efflorescence which, in spite of history, madness and the disturbed surface of the tangible world, are celebrated today, inside and outside of many golden pavilions."-- Lincoln Kirstein, The Nation
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Zen and Japanese Culture' is one of the 20th century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution.
Main Description
Zen and Japanese Culture is one of the twentieth century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution. He connects Zen to the philosophy of the samurai, and subtly portrays the relationship between Zen and swordsmanship, haiku, tea ceremonies, and the Japanese love of nature. Suzuki's contemplative work is enhanced by anecdotes, poetry, and illustrations showing silk screens, calligraphy, and examples of architecture. Since its original publication in 1938, this important work has played a major role in shaping conceptions of Zen's influence on Japanese traditional arts. Richard Jaffe's introduction acquaints a new generation of readers with Suzuki's life and career in both Japan and America. Jaffe discusses how Zen and Japanese Culture was received upon its first publication and analyzes the book in light of contemporary criticism, especially by scholars of Japanese Buddhism.
Main Description
Zen and Japanese Cultureis one of the twentieth century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution. He connects Zen to the philosophy of the samurai, and subtly portrays the relationship between Zen and swordsmanship, haiku, tea ceremonies, and the Japanese love of nature. Suzuki's contemplative work is enhanced by anecdotes, poetry, and illustrations showing silk screens, calligraphy, and examples of architecture.Since its original publication in 1938, this important work has played a major role in shaping conceptions of Zen's influence on Japanese traditional arts. Richard Jaffe's introduction acquaints a new generation of readers with Suzuki's life and career in both Japan and America. Jaffe discusses howZen and Japanese Culturewas received upon its first publication and analyzes the book in light of contemporary criticism, especially by scholars of Japanese Buddhism.
Table of Contents
Introduction to the 2010 Editionp. vii
Prefacep. xxix
List of Platesp. xxxi
Chronologyp. xliv
What Is Zen?p. 1
General Remarks on Japanese Art Culturep. 19
Zen and the Study of Confucianismp. 39
Zen and the Samuraip. 59
Zen and Swordsmanship Ip. 87
Zen and Swordsmanship IIp. 137
Zen and Haikup. 215
Zen and the Art of Tea Ip. 269
Zen and the Art of Tea IIp. 291
Rikyu and Other Teamenp. 315
Love of Naturep. 329
Appendicesp. 397
Two Mondo from the "Hekigan-shu"p. 399
The Vimalakirti Sutrap. 410
"Yama-uba," a No Playp. 419
The Swordsman and the Catp. 428
Chuang-tzup. 436
Bibliographyp. 443
Indexp. 449
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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