Catalogue


Franklin and Bache [electronic resource] : envisioning the enlightened republic /
Jeffery A. Smith.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
description
222 p. : 3 ill.
ISBN
0195056760 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
isbn
0195056760 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7372635
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 173-214) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-02:
Smith (University of Iowa) connects Enlightenment thought with practical politics in the young American republic, and by extension seeks to illuminate the transition from high-minded journalism in the mid-18th century to strident partisanship among newspaper writers after the Revolution. By focusing on two prominent editors--Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Franklin Bache--Smith combines biography with intellectual history. He explicates and emphasizes Franklin's republican values, and traces the decline of the great Philadelphian's ethos of toleration by examining the career of Franklin's favorite grandson. Although Smith's conception of a dual biography is intriguing, there is little that is challenging in this book. Smith's extended analysis of Franklin's republican values derives from numerous secondary studies. His account of Bache's brief career as a journalistic antagonist of two Federalist administrations is interesting. Yet, aside from the author's focus on Bache's fierce devotion to democracy, he adds little to what Donald Steward first presented in The Opposition Press of the Federalist Period (CH, May'70). Franklin and Bache will be useful primarily as an introduction to the journalistic values and practices of its subjects. General readership. -M. J. Birkner, Gettysburg College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Smith's careful and thoughtful analysis of the relationship between Franklin and Bache sheds valuable light on the role of education and the fate of disinterested republicanism in the new nation."--History of Education Quarterly "Well researched....Highly readable. It seems to me to be a model for intellectual biography."--American Journalism "Jeffery Smith is a rare combination of superb writer, conscientious researcher, and perceptive historian. This new book has the potential of contributing significantly to our understanding of the development of Republican and Enlightenment ideology in the early republic."--Paul G. Boyer, University of Wisconsin, Madison "This extensively researched and documented book is an intelligent addition to the literature on Franklin's moral philosophy as well as an excellent and long-needed biographic introduction to Bache."--Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography "Reviewing the education and development of Benjamin Franklin Bache in radical republican principle, Smith clearly illustrates this nation's ideological conflict in its formative years with a focus on connunication. The significance of the Aurora to Jeffersonian Republicans is incalculable, and it is amazing that scholars have not dealt with this before. Bache's newspaper, aimed at Washington and Adams, clearly has been underrated by historians of the past."--MaryAnn Yodelis Smith, Associate Vice Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Centers, Madison
"Smith's careful and thoughtful analysis of the relationship between Franklin and Bache sheds valuable light on the role of education and the fate of disinterested republicanism in the new nation."-- History of Education Quarterly "Well researched....Highly readable. It seems to me to be a model for intellectual biography."-- American Journalism "Jeffery Smith is a rare combination of superb writer, conscientious researcher, and perceptive historian. This new book has the potential of contributing significantly to our understanding of the development of Republican and Enlightenment ideology in the early republic."--Paul G. Boyer, University of Wisconsin, Madison "This extensively researched and documented book is an intelligent addition to the literature on Franklin's moral philosophy as well as an excellent and long-needed biographic introduction to Bache."-- Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography "Reviewing the education and development of Benjamin Franklin Bache in radical republican principle, Smith clearly illustrates this nation's ideological conflict in its formative years with a focus on connunication. The significance of the Aurora to Jeffersonian Republicans is incalculable, and it is amazing that scholars have not dealt with this before. Bache's newspaper, aimed at Washington and Adams, clearly has been underrated by historians of the past."--MaryAnn Yodelis Smith, Associate Vice Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Centers, Madison
"Smith's careful and thoughtful analysis of the relationship between Franklin and Bache sheds valuable light on the role of education and the fate of disinterested republicanism in the new nation."--History of Education Quarterly "Well researched....Highly readable. It seems to me to be a model for intellectual biography."--American Journalism "Jeffery Smith is a rare combination of superb writer, conscientious researcher, and perceptive historian. This new book has the potential of contributing significantly to our understanding of the development of Republican and Enlightenment ideology in the early republic."--Paul G. Boyer,University of Wisconsin, Madison "This extensively researched and documented book is an intelligent addition to the literature on Franklin's moral philosophy as well as an excellent and long-needed biographic introduction to Bache."--Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography "Reviewing the education and development of Benjamin Franklin Bache in radical republican principle, Smith clearly illustrates this nation's ideological conflict in its formative years with a focus on connunication. The significance of theAurorato Jeffersonian Republicans is incalculable, and it is amazing that scholars have not dealt with this before. Bache's newspaper, aimed at Washington and Adams, clearly has been underrated by historians of the past."--MaryAnn Yodelis Smith, Associate Vice Chancellor,University of Wisconsin Centers, Madison
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
At the end of his seventy-year career as a journalist, Benjamin Franklin trained his grandson, Benjamin Franklin Bache, in his profession. After his grandfather's death, Bache brought the republican and Enlightenment ideas he had been taught to the heated party controversies of the 1790s. He became the leading Jeffersonian journalist of the period and was boycotted, physically assaulted, and eventually charged with seditious libel shortly before his death in 1798. Jeffery Smithvividly illustrates the intense ideological conflict of the period through this original study of Bache's education and career.
Long Description
Fostering the "pursuit of happiness" was an avowed purpose of the American Revolution, but what was the phrase to mean in practice? How would the new society being created achieve what Enlightenment egalitarians called the "common good"? In this dual biography of Benjamin Franklin and his grandson Benjamin Franklin Bache, Jeffery A. Smith examines the careers of two of the most prominent journalists to advocate what became known as Jeffersonian republicanism. Franklin used his writings to encourage the kind of conscientious and public-spirited behavior he thought necessary if the majority of people were to secure free and prosperous lives. He impressed these ideals on Bache as he supervised his education in three countries and established him as a printer-publisher in Philadelphia. In the 1790s, as Federalists and Republicans battled over the course the United States would take in national and international affairs, Franklin's carefully indoctrinated protege became Jefferson's confidant and most fierce journalistic supporter. Franklin and Bache were among those envisioning a nation where liberty, learning, and a more even distribution of wealth would inaugurate a new epoch in human history. Published on the 200th anniversary of Franklin's death, this careful study offers a much-needed illumination of early American aspirations for a democratic future.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 3
The Pursuit of the Common Goodp. 9
Benjamin Franklin and the Foundations of Enlightenment Republicanismp. 25
The Science of Doing Goodp. 27
Educating the Enlightened Childp. 45
Making the Republican Citizenp. 63
Benjamin Franklin Bache and the Rise of Jeffersonian Journalismp. 83
Newspapers for the New Nationp. 85
World Revolution and American Reformp. 111
Defending the Democratsp. 134
Conclusion: Finding the Futurep. 164
Notesp. 173
A Note on Sourcesp. 213
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem