Catalogue


Paths of resistance [electronic resource] : tradition and dignity in industrializing Missouri /
David Thelen.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1986.
description
x, 321 p.
ISBN
0195036670 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1986.
isbn
0195036670 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7372554
 
Bibliography: p. 275-310.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-11:
As Wisconsin went, so followed Missouri, at least in many respects. That Thelan sees similarities will be no surprise to readers of his The New Citizenship; Origins of Progressivism in Wisconsin, 18851900 (CH, Jul '72) and Robert LaFollette and the Insurgent Spirit (CH, May '76). But business Progressives who promoted change are not Thelen's heroes, nor are reform Progressives who failed. Rather, his sympathies are with those who resisted change. Thelen's basic theme is modernization, but he stresses the efforts of a premodern society to combat the new order of competition and growth. Most Missourians, native and immigrant, were traditionalists whose life centered in the family and local community, where the market was a local trade area in which the just price still prevailed. The railroad and other businesses placed Missourians into national and international competition that necessitated growth in expensive machines and cheap labor. They responded with opposition to railroad bonds, violence, and strikes. After a moderate Populist movement failed, a consumer revolt developed into the ``Missouri Idea'' of forcing big business to obey the law. Joseph Folk and Herbert Hadley led the Progressive attack, but Folk was too much the moralist, and Hadley turned to regulation of business rather than antitrust prosecution. Thelen sympathises with the old order's participatory democracy, decentralization, and majority rule. Most rejected socialism and disliked the discipline of corporate management, but they lacked an issue-oriented political system that could assure a continuance of community control. College, university, and public libraries.-L.H. Grothaus, Concordia Teachers College
Appeared in Library Journal on 1986-03-01:
Thelen's study of 19th-century Missouri is more far-reaching than the subtitle suggests; indeed it is paradigmatic, a subtle and powerful account of how rural society was transformed by industrialization and economic growth. It explores how a society anchored to the past defensively responded to the erosion of a traditional way of life and culture. Resistance to the new competitive market economy took many forms: vigilantism; hostility to public education; banditry; the 1877 general strike uniting black and white, skilled and unskilled; the rise of an oppositional cultureand how imaginatively used is Scott Joplin and ragtimeand ``the resistance of folk memories.'' There is a superb account of local Populism and Progressivism. Irresistably intelligent and readable, this is primarily for subject specialists. Milton Cantor, History Dept., Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bold and provocative....Thelen reaches new and novel conclusions about the rise of the Show Me State."--Hayes Historical Journal
"Bold and provocative....Thelen reaches new and novel conclusions aboutthe rise of the Show Me State."--Hayes Historical Journal
"His controversial thesis will encourage reassessment of Missouri's contribution to modern America."--History
"His controversial thesis will encourage reassessment of Missouri'scontribution to modern America."--History
"Superb....Well-documented and persuasively argued."--Indiana Magazine of History
"Superb....Well-documented and persuasively argued."--Indiana Magazine ofHistory
"The product of thorough and creative scholarship....Filled with gems of historical analysis."--Journal of Southern History
"The product of thorough and creative scholarship....Filled with gems ofhistorical analysis."--Journal of Southern History
"[This] is a fine study...a book to read and contend with."--American Historical Review
"[This] is a fine study...a book to read and contend with."--AmericanHistorical Review
"[This] is a fine study...a book to read and contend with."--American Historical Review "His controversial thesis will encourage reassessment of Missouri's contribution to modern America."--History "The product of thorough and creative scholarship....Filled with gems of historical analysis."--Journal of Southern History "Superb....Well-documented and persuasively argued."--Indiana Magazine of History "Bold and provocative....Thelen reaches new and novel conclusions about the rise of the Show Me State."--Hayes Historical Journal
"[This] is a fine study...a book to read and contend with."-- American Historical Review "His controversial thesis will encourage reassessment of Missouri's contribution to modern America."-- History "The product of thorough and creative scholarship....Filled with gems of historical analysis."-- Journal of Southern History "Superb....Well-documented and persuasively argued."-- Indiana Magazine of History "Bold and provocative....Thelen reaches new and novel conclusions about the rise of the Show Me State."-- Hayes Historical Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, March 1986
Choice, November 1986
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The years between 1865 and 1920 were eventful ones for the sake of Missouri. It was not only the time of Jesse James, Scott Joplin, and Mark Twain, of progressive governors Joseph Folk and Herbert Hadley, of the first general strike in St. Louis and some especially vicious vigilante activity, it was also the time when Missouri, like many other states, was being transformed by the tides of industrialism and economic growth. This social history examines the social and economic forces that resisted economic development in Missouri. Here, Thelen explores the various ways that people attempted to maintain their values and dignity in the face of overwhelming new economic, cultural, and political pressures, and analyzes the grassroots patterns that emerged in response to rapid social change. Thelen, who is one of the leading historians of the Progressive period in America, contends that people found their strength not in class solidarity or other Marxist responses but in what he calls "the resistance of folk memories", which allowed them to call upon the best elements of their collective past to help them cope with the new situation.
Main Description
The years between 1865 and 1920 were eventful ones for the sake of Missouri. It was not only the time of Jesse James, Scott Joplin, and Mark Twain, of progressive governors Joseph Folk and Herbert Hadley, of the first general strike in St. Louis and some especially vicious vigilante activity,it was also the time when Missouri, like many other states, was being transformed by the tides of industrialism and economic growth. This social history examines the social and economic forces that resisted economic development in Missouri. Here, Thelen explores the various ways that peopleattempted to maintain their values and dignity in the face of overwhelming new economic, cultural, and political pressures, and analyzes the grassroots patterns that emerged in response to rapid social change. Thelen, who is one of the leading historians of the Progressive period in America,contends that people found their strength not in class solidarity or other Marxist responses but in what he calls "the resistance of folk memories", which allowed them to call upon the best elements of their collective past to help them cope with the new situation.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 3
The Integration of Life in the Old Orderp. 9
Traditional Values and the Old Orderp. 11
The Land, the Rivers, and the Peoplep. 11
The Traditional Unity of Life and Workp. 13
Family, Community, and the Variations of Culturep. 17
Politics and Governmentp. 21
Creation of the New Orderp. 25
The Engine of Growthp. 27
Expanding the Marketp. 29
The Developers of Agriculturep. 35
The New Insecuritiesp. 44
The Invisible Handp. 45
The New Toolsp. 47
The New Competitorsp. 51
The New Authorities and Secularismp. 55
Primitive Resistance to the New Orderp. 57
The Law, Outlaws, and Railroadsp. 59
The Civil War and the Crisis of Law and Authorityp. 59
The Battle over Railroad Bondsp. 62
Jesse James, America's Classic Social Banditp. 70
The Great Strike of 1877 and Ownership of Lawp. 77
Communities, Economic Development, and Vigilantesp. 86
The Bald Knobbers of the 1880sp. 87
Race and Class War in the Bootheelp. 92
The Cultural Warp. 101
Discipline and Self-Disciplinep. 103
Economic and Military Compulsionsp. 103
The Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Childrenp. 108
The Democratic Culture of Escape and Ragtimep. 117
Mutual Aidp. 131
The Protections of Church, Race, and Languagep. 133
Immigrant Cultures and Mutual Aidp. 134
Segregation, Racial Control, and Mutual Aidp. 139
White Protestants and the Crises of Conduct and Controlp. 146
The Fraternal and Cooperative Ethic of Mutual Aidp. 156
The Search for Security in the New Workplacesp. 173
The Economic Organization of the New Orderp. 175
The Organization of Businessp. 175
The Organization of the Professionsp. 182
The Organization of Laborp. 189
Political Resistance in the New Orderp. 201
Traditional Resistance, Populism, and the Limits of Politicsp. 205
Traditional Resistance and the Limits of Politicsp. 205
Populism and the Limits of Politicsp. 211
The Consumer Revolt and the Grass-Roots Origins of the Missouri Ideap. 217
The Consumer Revoltp. 219
Bribery and the Local Origins of the Missouri Ideap. 231
The Missouri Idea and State Politicsp. 238
The Folk Administration and the Flowering of the Missouri Ideap. 238
The Changing Context of Popular Controlp. 251
The Decline of the Missouri Idea and the Rise of Regulationp. 254
Epiloguep. 266
The Problem of Cutting Distance: Structurep. 268
The Problem of Cutting Distance: Participationp. 270
Winning, Losing, and Democracyp. 272
A Note on Sourcesp. 275
Notesp. 278
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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