Catalogue


Knowledge works [electronic resource] : managing intellectual capital at Toshiba /
W. Mark Fruin.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
ix, 267 p. : ill., map
ISBN
0195081951 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0195081951 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7372494
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-251) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Knowledge Works is an enjoyable book that adds to our understanding of how organizations develop knowledge and learning."--Sloan Management Review
"Knowledge Works is an enjoyable book that adds to our understanding of how organizations develop knowledge and learning."--Sloan Management Review "This book is a useful and thought-provoking study of how a single factory is organized to support rapid innovation in both process and prodcution technology.[. . .] Having worked in the Yanagicho factory as an employee, Fruin writes with an authority born of experience. [. . .] Fuin bravely enters the realm of individual values, culture, and, inevitably, history. Knowledge Works persuasively demonstrates the importance of these less quantifiable and more local aspects of human experience. [. . .] Well constructed and excellently researched."--EH.NET
" Knowledge Works is an enjoyable book that adds to our understanding of how organizations develop knowledge and learning."-- Sloan Management Review "This book is a useful and thought-provoking study of how a single factory is organized to support rapid innovation in both process and prodcution technology.[. . .] Having worked in the Yanagicho factory as an employee, Fruin writes with an authority born of experience. [. . .] Fuin bravely enters the realm of individual values, culture, and, inevitably, history. Knowledge Works persuasively demonstrates the importance of these less quantifiable and more local aspects of human experience. [. . .] Well constructed and excellently researched."-- EH.NET
"Knowledge Worksis an enjoyable book that adds to our understanding of how organizations develop knowledge and learning."--Sloan Management Review "This book is a useful and thought-provoking study of how a single factory is organized to support rapid innovation in both process and prodcution technology.[. . .] Having worked in the Yanagicho factory as an employee, Fruin writes with an authority born of experience. [. . .] Fuin bravely enters the realm of individual values, culture, and, inevitably, history.Knowledge Workspersuasively demonstrates the importance of these less quantifiable and more local aspects of human experience. [. . .] Well constructed and excellently researched."--EH.NET
"Knowledge Works is an enjoyable book that adds to our understanding ofhow organizations develop knowlege and learning."--Sloan ManagementReview
"This book is a useful and thought-provoking study of how a single factoryis organized to support rapid innovation in both process and prodcutiontechnology.[. . .] Having worked in the Yanagicho factory as an employee, Fruinwrites with an authority born of experience. [. . .] Fuin bravely enters therealm of individual values, culture, and, inevitably, history. Knowledge Workspersuasively demonstrates the importance of these less quantifiable and morelocal aspects of human experience. [. . .] Well constructed and excellentlyresearched."--EH.NET
"This book is a useful and thought-provoking study of how a single factory is organized to support rapid innovation in both process and production technology.[. . .] Having worked in the Yanagicho factory as an employee, Fruin writes with an authority born of experience. [. . .] Fuin bravelyenters the realm of individual values, culture, and, inevitably, history. Knowledge Works persuasively demonstrates the importance of these less quantifiable and more local aspects of human experience. [. . .] Well constructed and excellently researched."--EH.NET
1. Form, Creativity, and Competitiveness 2. Architectures for Innovation and Renewal 3. Organization Campaigning 4. Managing Competition and Cooperation 5. Computer-on-a-Card 6. Internationalizing Knowledge Works 7. Learning Strategies and Learning Factories Notes Bibliography Appendix Index
"Knowledge Works is an enjoyable book that adds to our understanding of how organizations develop knowledge and learning."--Sloan Management Review"This book is a useful and thought-provoking study of how a single factory is organized to support rapid innovation in both process and production technology.[. . .] Having worked in the Yanagicho factory as an employee, Fruin writes with an authority born of experience. [. . .] Fuin bravely enters the realm of individual values, culture, and, inevitably, history. Knowledge Works persuasively demonstrates the importance of these less quantifiable andmore local aspects of human experience. [. . .] Well constructed and excellently researched."--EH.NET
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Fruin shows how Japanese firms have developed factories that are the most productive, efficient and flexible in the world. He demonstrates that the key to success is the continuous creation and use of knowledge throughout the whole factory complex.
Long Description
This book describes why, for the past twenty-five years, Japanese productivity has been growing more rapidly than productivity in the U.S. Unlike other books on the subject of the Japanese success in manufacturing, it looks at what actually happens in factories. The author brings his experience of working at the Yanagicho Works of the Toshiba Corporation, in Kawasaki City. Like so many Japanese factories, this one is highly productive, efficient, and flexible. While the factory is ordinary looking on the outside, its workers are anything but ordinary as they constantly strive to improve the way they work and the quality of the products they produce. The key to this is the continuous creation and application of knowledge throughout the factory, from workers on the shop floor, to research and development engineers, to top management. Fruin explains how Japanese culture and religion prepare workers for their role in this process of creating and disseminating knowledge.
Long Description
This book offers a close-up look at a factory in Japan that is typical of what the author calls 'Knowledge Works'. Like so many Japanese factories, this one - the Yanagicho works of the Toshiba Corporation - is highly productive, efficient, and flexible. While the factory is ordinary looking on the outside, its workers are anything but ordinary as they strive to improve the way they work and the quality of the products they produce. The key to this is the continuous creation and application of knowledge throughout the factory, from workers on the shop floor, to research and development engineers, to top management. The author explains how Japanese culture and religion prepare workers for their role in this process of creating and disseminating knowledge.
Main Description
Reflecting on his experiences at the Yanagicho Works of the Toshiba Corporation in Kawasaki City, Fruin details a system of information and knowledge dissemination that he considers the foundation of Japan's success in manufacturing. He also explains how Japanese culture and religion prepare workers for their role in this process of creating and disseminating knowledge.
Main Description
This book describes why, for the past twenty-five years, Japanese productivity has been growing more rapidly than productivity in the U.S. Unlike other books on the subject of the Japanese success in manufacturing, it looks at what actually happens in factories. The author brings hisexperience of working at the Yanagicho Works of the Toshiba Corporation, in Kawasaki City. Like so many Japanese factories, this one is highly productive, efficient, and flexible. While the factory is ordinary looking on the outside, its workers are anything but ordinary as they constantly strive toimprove the way they work and the quality of the products they produce. The key to this is the continuous creation and application of knowledge throughout the factory, from workers on the shop floor, to research and development engineers, to top management. Fruin explains how Japanese culture andreligion prepare workers for their role in this process of creating and disseminating knowledge.
Table of Contents
Form, Creativity, and Competitiveness
Architectures for Innovation and Renewal
Organization Campaigning
Managing Competition and Cooperation
Computer-on-a-Card
Internationalizing Knowledge Works
Learning Strategies and Learning Factories
Notes
Bibliography
Appendix
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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