Catalogue


The economist [electronic resource] : Henry Thoreau and enterprise /
Leonard N. Neufeldt.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1989.
description
xiii, 210 p.
ISBN
0195057899 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1989.
isbn
0195057899 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7372492
 
Includes bibliographies and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-11:
Neufeldt is moving Thoreau studies in important new directions. Long involved in the editing of Thoreau's works, he brings his textual knowledge to bear in this multidisciplinary work, which also draws upon rhetorical, semantic, formalistic, dialogic, and cultural criticism in order to elucidate "Thoreau's participation in the economic discourse of his time and place." In the two main parts--"Enterprise, Economy, and Vocation" and "Walden and the Guidebook for Young Men"-- Neufeldt is impressive in showing how Thoreau was influenced and shaped by his culture and how he rejected or contested many aspects of that culture. Neufeldt presents this complicated argument lucidly and convincingly. This sophisticated and elegant work is thoroughly researched and well indexed. Highly recommended for undergraduate and graduate literary collections. -G. Hendrick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A significant contribution to Henry Thoreau scholarship."--Journal of Economic History
"A significant contribution to Henry Thoreau scholarship."--Journal ofEconomic History
"Neufeldt convincingly shows how imperative it is that readers of Waldon know the lexicon of enterprise out of which and aginst which it was written."--New England Quarterly
"Neufeldt convincingly shows how imperative it is that readers of Waldonknow the lexicon of enterprise out of which and aginst which it waswritten."--New England Quarterly
"Neufeldt is moving Thoreau studies in important new directions....Impressive in showing how Thoreau was influenced and shaped by his culture and hwo he rejected or contested many aspects of that culture....This sophisticated and elegant work is thoroughly researched and well indexed. Highlyrecommended for undergraduate and graduate literary collections."--Choice
"Neufeldt is moving Thoreau studies in important newdirections....Impressive in showing how Thoreau was influenced and shaped by hisculture and hwo he rejected or contested many aspects of that culture....Thissophisticated and elegant work is thoroughly researched and well indexed. Highlyrecommended for undergraduate and graduate literary collections."--Choice
"Neufelt succeeds in bringing to bear in his reading of Thoreau a semantic web of American "culture" complete with its jaded cliches, rapturous dreams, and business homilies. The result is a more animated Thoreau who adamantly writes with a resisting voice at the beginning of the great age ofAmerican capitalist enterprise. Let us hope this trend for Thoreau scholarship continues."--Modern Philology
"Neufelt succeeds in bringing to bear in his reading of Thoreau a semanticweb of American "culture" complete with its jaded cliches, rapturous dreams, andbusiness homilies. The result is a more animated Thoreau who adamantly writeswith a resisting voice at the beginning of the great age of American capitalistenterprise. Let us hope this trend for Thoreau scholarship continues."--ModernPhilology
"A significant contribution to Henry Thoreau scholarship."--Journal of Economic History"Neufelt succeeds in bringing to bear in his reading of Thoreau a semantic web of American "culture" complete with its jaded cliches, rapturous dreams, and business homilies. The result is a more animated Thoreau who adamantly writes with a resisting voice at the beginning of the great age of American capitalist enterprise. Let us hope this trend for Thoreau scholarship continues."--Modern Philology"Neufeldt convincingly shows how imperative it is that readers of Waldon know the lexicon of enterprise out of which and aginst which it was written."--New England Quarterly"Neufeldt is moving Thoreau studies in important new directions....Impressive in showing how Thoreau was influenced and shaped by his culture and hwo he rejected or contested many aspects of that culture....This sophisticated and elegant work is thoroughly researched and well indexed. Highly recommended for undergraduate and graduate literary collections."--Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1989
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This is a study of Thoreau's participation in the economic discourse of his time, when New England and America underwent an unprecedented transformation in economic thinking and behaviour. The first part of the book examines Thoreau's responses to economic and cultural conditions as a literary artist, who identified his writing as his vocation. The second part, which uses Walden as an example, attempts to offer an answer to the question of why and how Thoreau, who was very muchcontained by his culture and its conventions, also contested the limitations of those conventions and used his condition to transform them.
Long Description
This major study brings to light Thoreau's relation to the complex economic discourse of his time and place. Specifically, it examines the impact of transformations in economic thinking and behavior that occurred in antebellum New England and America; these transformations at the level of language; and Thoreau's awareness of these transformations. Neufeldt situates Thoreau in significant economic conditions of his time, investigating how these conditions contained him even as he sought to contain them. Using Walden and "Life without Principle," as main examples, the book considers the questions of why and how Thoreau, who was very much shaped by his culture and its conventions, also contested the limitations of those conventions and used his condition to transform some of them. Thoreau's identity as a literary artist who regarded his writing as his cultural vocation is at the center of the discussion.
Main Description
This major study brings to light Thoreau's relation to the complex economic discourse of his time and place. Specifically, it examines the impact of transformations in economic thinking and behavior that occurred in antebellum New England and America; these transformations at the level oflanguage; and Thoreau's awareness of these transformations. Neufeldt situates Thoreau in significant economic conditions of his time, investigating how these conditions contained him even as he sought to contain them. Using Walden and "Life without Principle," as main examples, the book considersthe questions of why and how Thoreau, who was very much shaped by his culture and its conventions, also contested the limitations of those conventions and used his condition to transform some of them. Thoreau's identity as a literary artist who regarded his writing as his cultural vocation is at thecenter of the discussion.
Main Description
This major study examines Thoreau's participation in the economic discourse of his time and place. It focuses on the cultural conditions in the time of Thoreau, his awareness of them, and his responses to them as a literary artist who identified his writing as his vocation.

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