Catalogue


Revolutionary citizens [electronic resource] : African Americans, 1776-1804 /
by Daniel C. Littlefield.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c1997.
description
141 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195087151 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c1997.
isbn
0195087151 (Paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
abstract
Chronicles the lives of African Americans during the Revolutionary War and the early years of the nation.
catalogue key
7372280
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 136-139) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Explores the role of African Americans immediately before, during, and after the war of 1776."--School Library Journal "Emphasizes the active roles African Americans played in moving the country toward the abolishment of slavery."--VOYA "Good resources on American history from the African American perspective; these books will help fill a gap in many collections."--Booklist
"Good resources on American history from the African American perspective; these books will help fill a gap in many collections."--Booklist
"Explores the role of African Americans immediately before, during, and after the war of 1776."-- School Library Journal "Emphasizes the active roles African Americans played in moving the country toward the abolishment of slavery."-- VOYA "Good resources on American history from the African American perspective; these books will help fill a gap in many collections."-- Booklist
"Emphasizes the active roles African Americans played in moving the country toward the abolishment of slavery."--VOYA
"Explores the role of African Americans immediately before, during, and after the war of 1776."--School Library Journal
"Explores the role of African Americans immediately before, during, and after the war of 1776."--School Library Journal d 1998/01/01 "Emphasizes the active roles African Americans played in moving the country toward the abolishment of slavery."--VOYA d 1997/12/01 "Good resources on American history from the African American perspective; these books will help fill a gap in many collections."--Booklist
This item was reviewed in:
Horn Book Magazine,
Booklist, August 1997
Horn Book Guide, September 1997
School Library Journal, January 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
-- Real-life stories and primary sources show the diversity of the African-American experience-- Fascinating illustrations, many never before published-- Reconsiders key events of American history from an Afrocentric perspective-- Featured African Americans include Crispus Attucks, Harriet Tubman, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Thurgood Marshall, Martin Luther King, Jr., Spike Lee, Carol Moseley-Braun, and many, many more-- Each volume is written by a leading American historian-- Each book includes a full chronology, suggestions for further reading, and an index-- The 11th volume contains a series index and brief biographies of notable African-American men and women
Library of Congress Summary
Chronicles the lives of African Americans during the Revolutionary War and the early years of the nation.
Main Description
It is not entirely clear who provoked the British musket fire at the Custom House in Boston on March 5, 1770, but the volley wounded eight men and killed five. Crispus Attucks, a tall, young mulatto, was one of the men who died in the confrontation. He would later become a revolutionary hero, celebrated as "the first to defy, and the first to die" in the cause of colonial liberty that went down in history as the Boston Massacre. When the American Revolution broke out six years later, African Americans like Crispus Attucks were among the first to rally to Patriot banners. As they fought to free their country, they also fought to free themselves from slavery. This nation's fight for independence from Great Britain laid bare the contradictions between slavery and freedom for African Americans. It was a contradiction many resolved to settle. Some joined with other colonists in striking direct blows for liberty. Others, meanwhile, heard the pleas for loyalty to the British crown, and with the promise of emancipation as their reward, remained faithful to the old order only to see it vanish before them. But whether in the poems of Phillis Wheatley, the legal action of Quok Walker, or the efforts of businessman Paul Cuffe, Americans of African descent helped define what it meant to be revolutionary citizens. By 1804, however, slavery seized a new lease on life. "King Cotton" demanded black slaves and produced a generation born into servitude. Unlike their immigrant forefathers, these African Americans had no memory of a homeland and depended upon stories handed down around fireplaces, campfires, and bedsides for their knowledge of their ancestors. They might hear of people who had fought with the British, or against them, or of people who had gone overseas or run away and formed communities of their own. Unfortunately, they would have few opportunities for such heroics in the 19th century. In Revolutionary Citizens , author Daniel C. Littlefield brings to life African-American heroes and heroines who both shaped and were shaped by the times in which they lived. From their embrace of religion to the formation of independent institutions such as the Free African Union Society, African Americans inserted themselves into the social and cultural life of the country. Ever aware of the implication of freedom, they spread word of their own efforts throughout the Americas.
Authored Title
A look at African Americans in the United States in the years immediately after the Revolutionary War. Colonists gaining freedom from the King of England made slaves look differently at their own lack of freedom. Many slaves & freedmen had openly volunteered to fight for England. Whitney's invention & its impact on helping slavery to thrive are discussed. Chronology, list of further readings, & index. Part of the Young Oxford History of African Americans series.
Long Description
It is not entirely clear who provoked the British musket fire at the Custom House in Boston on March 5, 1770, but the volley wounded eight men and killed five. Crispus Attucks, a tall, young mulatto, was one of the men who died in the confrontation. He would later become a revolutionary hero, celebrated as "the first to defy, and the first to die" in the cause of colonial liberty that went down in history as the Boston Massacre. When the American Revolution broke out six years later, African Americans like Crispus Attucks were among the first to rally to Patriot banners. As they fought to free their country, they also fought to free themselves from slavery. This nation's fight for independence from Great Britain laid bare the contradictions between slavery and freedom for African Americans. It was a contradiction many resolved to settle. Some joined with other colonists in striking direct blows for liberty. Others, meanwhile, heard the pleas for loyalty to the British crown, and with the promise of emancipation as their reward, remained faithful to the old order only to see it vanish before them. But whether in the poems of Phillis Wheatley, the legal action of Quok Walker, or the efforts of businessman Paul Cuffe, Americans of African descent helped define what it meant to be revolutionary citizens. By 1804, however, slavery seized a new lease on life. "King Cotton" demanded black slaves and produced a generation born into servitude. Unlike their immigrant forefathers, these African Americans had no memory of a homeland and depended upon stories handed down around fireplaces, campfires, and bedsides for their knowledge of their ancestors. They might hear of people who had fought with the British, or against them, or of people who had gone overseas or run away and formed communities of their own. Unfortunately, they would have few opportunities for such heroics in the 19th century. In Revolutionary Citizens, author Daniel C. Littlefield brings to life African-American heroes and heroines who both shaped and were shaped by the times in which they lived. From their embrace of religion to the formation of independent institutions such as the Free African Union Society, African Americans inserted themselves into the social and cultural life of the country. Ever aware of the implication of freedom, they spread word of their own efforts throughout the Americas.

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