Catalogue


The divided heart [electronic resource] : essays on Protestantism and the Enlightenment in America /
Henry F. May.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1991.
description
219 p.
ISBN
0195058992 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1991.
isbn
0195058992 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7372277
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-213) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Few historians have written for as long or as well about the American mind of Henry May."--Church History
"Few historians have written for as long or as well about the Americanmind of Henry May."--Church History
"Few historians have written for as long or as well about the American mind of Henry May."-- Church History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Bringing together essays by a leading intellectual and religious historian, The Divided Heart is a collection of recent reflections, sometimes with a considerable autobiographical element, by Henry F. May on the conflict between Protestantism and the Enlightenment that runs throughout the history of American culture. Summarizing May's opinions on recent historiographical arguments, the introduction to The Divided Heart tells of his own development as a historian, major influences upon his thinking, and how his practicing assumptions grew. Covering religion, there are essays on early American history, Jonathan Edwards, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Reinhold Niebuhr, and "reflections on the uneasy relation" between religion and American intellectual history. Relating to the Enlightenment, there are essays on the Constitution and the "Jeffersonian Moment." Suggesting a new and interdisciplinary approach, May's last essay deals with the end of the Enlightenment and the beginning of Romanticism, an area of history with which he has never before dealt.
Long Description
This is a collection of essays, mainly written in the 1980s, by one of America's leading historians. Bringing together in one volume May's major interests, there are essays on the Constitution and the Enlightenment, Jefferson and the Enlightenment, the 'Jefferson Moment' in the Enlightenment, and Franklin in the Enlightenment, and on Jonathan Edwards, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Calvinism in America, Rheinhold Niebuhr, and 'reflections on the uneasy relation' between religion and American intellectual history.
Main Description
Bringing together essays by a leading intellectual and religious historian, The Divided Heart is a collection of recent reflections, sometimes with a considerable autobiographical element, by Henry F. May on the conflict between Protestantism and the Enlightenment that runs throughout thehistory of American culture. Summarizing May's opinions on recent historiographical arguments, the introduction to The Divided Heart tells of his own development as a historian, major influences upon his thinking, and how his practicing assumptions grew. Covering religion, there are essays on earlyAmerican history, Jonathan Edwards, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Reinhold Niebuhr, and "reflections on the uneasy relation" between religion and American intellectual history. Relating to the Enlightenment, there are essays on the Constitution and the "Jeffersonian Moment." Suggesting a new andinterdisciplinary approach, May's last essay deals with the end of the Enlightenment and the beginning of Romanticism, an area of history with which he has never before dealt.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Faith in Historyp. 3
Allegiances
Religion and American Intellectual History, 1945-1985: Reflections on an Uneasy Relationshipp. 17
The Rough Road to Virgin Landp. 33
The Prophet and the Establishmentp. 61
Edwards and After
Harriet Beecher Stowe's Oldtown Folks: An Introductionp. 75
Jonathan Edwards and Americap. 125
The Enlightenment and After
The Constitution and the Enlightened Consensusp. 147
The Jeffersonian Momentp. 161
After the Enlightenment: A Prospectusp. 179
Notesp. 197
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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