Catalogue


Egypt, Islam, and the Arabs [electronic resource] : the search for Egyptian nationhood, 1900-1930 /
Israel Gershoni and James P. Jankowski.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1986, c1987.
description
xviii, 346 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195040961 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1986, c1987.
isbn
0195040961 (Paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7372275
 
Bibliography: p. 326-335.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-06:
A serious and thoughtful study in intellectual history. Its purpose is to delineate the evolution of a distinctive Egyptian national consciousness as it emerged among the country's intellectual elite during the first three decades of the 20th century. Gershoni (Tel Aviv University) and Jankowski (University of Colorado, Boulder) have already individually established their credentials with earlier works in Middle Eastern history. In a balanced and persuasive argument, they demonstrate here that WW I and the Egyptian revolution of 1919 produced the first genuine manifestation of territorial Egyptian nationalism as distinct from the more traditional allurements of religion, language, or ethnicity. Their book is essentially an attempt to evaluate the changing character of the Egyptians' corporate self-awareness without losing sight of a historical context in which the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, as well as the Caliphate, left the way open for a clearer definition of national self-determination along more secular lines. This was primarily the achievement of Muhammad Husayn Haykal. Although Egypt has always been the only Arab-speaking country with a long and uninterrupted history of a separate political identity, it was only in this period following WW I that Haykal and the other writers and intellectuals discussed in the book were at last able to formulate and redefine an indigenous cultural nationalism. University libraries.-A. Silvera, Bryn Mawr College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] remarkable book, which deserves to be read by everyone who is interested in politics in the Third World...It is the story of a revealing moment in the history of the modern Middle East: the attempt by a small but very influential gorup of 'modernist' writers, intellectuals, andpoliticians to invent a 'totally new' territorial and nationalist 'collective self-image' for Egypt."--The New Republic
"[A] remarkable book, which deserves to be read by everyone who isinterested in politics in the Third World...It is the story of a revealingmoment in the history of the modern Middle East: the attempt by a small but veryinfluential gorup of 'modernist' writers, intellectuals, and politicians toinvent a 'totally new' territorial and nationalist 'collective self-image' forEgypt."--The New Republic
"[A] remarkable book, which deserves to be read by everyone who is interested in politics in the Third World...It is the story of a revealing moment in the history of the modern Middle East: the attempt by a small but very influential gorup of 'modernist' writers, intellectuals, and politicians to invent a 'totally new' territorial and nationalist 'collective self-image' for Egypt."--The New Republic "The most comprehensive and detailed treatment of the subject to date."--The Muslim World "Gershoni and Jankowski have made an outstanding contribution to our understanding....No serious student of twentieth-century Egypt can afford to ignore their book."--International History Review "Clearly written and persuasively argued...Gershoni and Jankowski have produced a valuable study on one phase of the Egyptian nationalist image in the modern period."--Middle East Review "Conceptualization and analysis are outstanding; the quantity and quality of sources virtually unparalleled."--Journal of Church and State
"[A] remarkable book, which deserves to be read by everyone who is interested in politics in the Third World...It is the story of a revealing moment in the history of the modern Middle East: the attempt by a small but very influential gorup of 'modernist' writers, intellectuals, and politicians to invent a 'totally new' territorial and nationalist 'collective self-image' for Egypt."-- The New Republic "The most comprehensive and detailed treatment of the subject to date."-- The Muslim World "Gershoni and Jankowski have made an outstanding contribution to our understanding....No serious student of twentieth-century Egypt can afford to ignore their book."-- International History Review "Clearly written and persuasively argued...Gershoni and Jankowski have produced a valuable study on one phase of the Egyptian nationalist image in the modern period."-- Middle East Review "Conceptualization and analysis are outstanding; the quantity and quality of sources virtually unparalleled."-- Journal of Church and State
"Clearly written and persuasively argued...Gershoni and Jankowski have produced a valuable study on one phase of the Egyptian nationalist image in the modern period."--Middle East Review
"Clearly written and persuasively argued...Gershoni and Jankowski haveproduced a valuable study on one phase of the Egyptian nationalist image in themodern period."--Middle East Review
"Conceptualization and analysis are outstanding; the quantity and quality of sources virtually unparalleled."--Journal of Church and State
"Conceptualization and analysis are outstanding; the quantity and qualityof sources virtually unparalleled."--Journal of Church and State
"Gershoni and Jankowski have made an outstanding contribution to our understanding....No serious student of twentieth-century Egypt can afford to ignore their book."--International History Review
"Gershoni and Jankowski have made an outstanding contribution to ourunderstanding....No serious student of twentieth-century Egypt can afford toignore their book."--International History Review
"The most comprehensive and detailed treatment of the subject to date."--The Muslim World
"The most comprehensive and detailed treatment of the subject todate."--The Muslim World
"This detailed and carefully crafted study...will add greatly to our knowledge of the development of nationalism in modern Egypt."--International Journal of African Historical Studies
"This detailed and carefully crafted study...will add greatly to ourknowledge of the development of nationalism in modern Egypt."--InternationalJournal of African Historical Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1987
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Throughout the 20th century, Egyptian nationalism has alternately revolved around three primary axes: a local Egyptian territorial nationalism, a sense of Arab ethnic-linguistic nationalism, and an identification with the wider Muslim community. This detailed study is devoted to the first major phase in the perennial debate over nationalism in modern Egypt--the territorial nationalism dominant in Egypt in the early 20th century. The first section of the book examines the effects of World War I and its aftermath, which temporarily gave rise to an exclusively Egyptianist national orientation in Egypt. Subsequent sections consider the intellectual and political dimensions of Egyptian interwar years. Egypt, Islam and the Arabs is the first volume in a new Oxford series, Studies in Middle Eastern History. The General Editors of the series are Bernard Lewis of Princeton University, Itamar Rabinovich of Tel Aviv University, and Roger M. Savory of the University of Toronto.
Main Description
Based on British archival sources and a close analysis of Egyptian books and articles of the period, this work examines the rise of territorial nationalism dominant in Egypt in the early 20th century.
Main Description
Throughout the 20th century, Egyptian nationalism has alternately revolvedaround three primary axes: a local Egyptian territorial nationalism, a sense ofArab ethnic-linguistic nationalism, and an identification with the wider Muslimcommunity. This detailed study is devoted to the first major phase in theperennial debate over nationalism in modern Egypt--the territorial nationalismdominant in Egypt in the early 20th century. The first section of the bookexamines the effects of World War I and its aftermath, which temporarily gaverise to an exclusively Egyptianist national orientation in Egypt. Subsequentsections consider the intellectual and political dimensions of Egyptian interwaryears. Egypt, Islam and the Arabs is the first volume in a new Oxford series,Studies in Middle Eastern History. The General Editors of the series areBernard Lewis of Princeton University, Itamar Rabinovich of Tel Aviv University,and Roger M. Savory of the University of Toronto.
Main Description
Throughout the 20th century, Egyptian nationalism has alternately revolved around three primary axes: a local Egyptian territorial nationalism, a sense of Arab ethnic-linguistic nationalism, and an identification with the wider Muslim community. This detailed study is devoted to the first major phase in the perennial debate over nationalism in modern Egypt--the territorial nationalism dominant in Egypt in the early 20th century. The first section of the book examines the effects of World War I and its aftermath, which temporarily gave rise to an exclusively Egyptianist national orientation in Egypt. Subsequent sections consider the intellectual and political dimensions of Egyptian interwar years. Egypt, Islam and the Arabs is the first volume in a new Oxford series, Studies in Middle Eastern History . The General Editors of the series are Bernard Lewis of Princeton University, Itamar Rabinovich of Tel Aviv University, and Roger M. Savory of the University of Toronto.
Main Description
Throughout the 20th century, Egyptian nationalism has alternately revolved around three primary axes: a local Egyptian territorial nationalism, a sense of Arab ethnic-linguistic nationalism, and an identification with the wider Muslim community. This detailed study is devoted to the firstmajor phase in the perennial debate over nationalism in modern Egypt--the territorial nationalism dominant in Egypt in the early 20th century. The first section of the book examines the effects of World War I and its aftermath, which temporarily gave rise to an exclusively Egyptianist nationalorientation in Egypt. Subsequent sections consider the intellectual and political dimensions of Egyptian interwar years. Egypt, Islam and the Arabs is the first volume in a new Oxford series, Studies in Middle Eastern History. The General Editors of the series are Bernard Lewis of PrincetonUniversity, Itamar Rabinovich of Tel Aviv University, and Roger M. Savory of the University of Toronto.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Nationalist Tendencies in Egypt, 1900-1914p. 3
The Shaping of a "New Egypt": World War and National Revolution, 1914-1926
Egyptians, Ottomans, and Arabs during World War Ip. 23
The Revolution of 1919 and Its Aftermath: The Apotheosis of Egyptian Nationalismp. 40
Egypt and the Caliphate Question, 1924-1926p. 55
The Intellectual Response: the Ideology of Egyptian Territorial Nationalism
Egyptian Intellectuals and the Formation of a New National Imagep. 77
The Egyptian Nationalist Image of the Arabsp. 96
The Egyptianist Image of Egypt: I. Environment and the Nationp. 130
The Egyptianist Image of Egypt: II. Toward an Egyptian Territorial Historyp. 143
The Egyptianist Image of Egypt: III. Pharaonicismp. 164
The Egyptianist Image of Egypt: IV. Toward an Egyptian National Literaturep. 191
Ideology in Action: Egypt, the Arabs, and the East in the 1920s
Egypt and the Arab World in the 1920sp. 231
"Easternism" in Egypt in the 1920sp. 255
Conclusion: The Triumph of Egyptianismp. 270
Notesp. 275
Bibliographyp. 326
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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