Catalogue


The public prints [electronic resource] : the newspaper in Anglo-American culture, 1665-1740 /
Charles E. Clark.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1994.
description
xiv, 330 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195082338 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1994.
isbn
0195082338 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7372206
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-318) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-10:
In recent years, studies of publishing have proliferated on both sides of the Atlantic as scholars have increasingly explored the ways in which culture is shaped by print. Clark's important book makes a major contribution to this field. He focuses on the American Colonial press during its formative years before 1740, particularly on the newspapers of Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. He considers the shift from newsletters, which primarily featured information, to newspapers proper, which incorporated propaganda as well as forms of popular entertainment. Clark expertly traces the transition from oral communication to print, a critical process that foreshadowed the coming predominance of commerce. His most insightful passages deal with the metropolitan pull of London, a connection too often overlooked by historians. By emphasizing the existence of an Anglo-American community, Clark is able to properly interpret "Americanization" to be as dependent on European as on local influences. This well-documented study opens new vistas for exploration. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. H. Wiener; City College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[An] extensively researched book....A carefully researched and well-written study...should be of interest to both general readers and more specialized scholars. For library historians, Clark offers an understanding of what is probably the most important reading material for most colonialAmericans outside of the Bible and the almanac. For students of U.S. history, Clark's work provides insights into the place of the newspaper in colonial culture and how it developed its important role as primary disseminator of essential political information."--Library and Culture
"[An] extensively researched book....A carefully researched andwell-written study...should be of interest to both general readers and morespecialized scholars. For library historians, Clark offers an understanding ofwhat is probably the most important reading material for most colonial Americansoutside of the Bible and the almanac. For students of U.S. history, Clark's workprovides insights into the place of the newspaper in colonial culture and how itdeveloped its important role as primary disseminator of essential politicalinformation."--Library and Culture
"Charles E. Clark offers the first extensive overview of Anglo-American newspapers through 1740....The Public Prints is readable and enriched by many important insights."--Business History Review
"Charles E. Clark offers the first extensive overview of Anglo-Americannewspapers through 1740....The Public Prints is readable and enriched by manyimportant insights."--Business History Review
"Clark is to be commended for an impressive display of primary research that covers newspapers from three newspaper centers (Boston, New York, and Philadelphia) as well as other towns....Overall the book is worth attention."--American Studies International
"Clark is to be commended for an impressive display of primary researchthat covers newspapers from three newspaper centers (Boston, New York, andPhiladelphia) as well as other towns....Overall the book is worthattention."--American Studies International
"[Clark] provides a strong and focussed survey of the earliest newspapers in American history....Will prove an invaluable library addition for any institution with strong journalism history sections."--The Midwest Book Review
"[Clark] provides a strong and focussed survey of the earliest newspapersin American history....Will prove an invaluable library addition for anyinstitution with strong journalism history sections."--The Midwest BookReview
"Clark's authoritative handling of his subject and comprehensive knowledge of the journalist's craft makes this an excellent resource for media scholars and for literary, cultural, and social historians interested in colonial newspapers' role in cultural development."--The Historian
"Clark's authoritative handling of his subject and comprehensive knowledgeof the journalist's craft makes this an excellent resource for media scholarsand for literary, cultural, and social historians interested in colonialnewspapers' role in cultural development."--The Historian
"Clark's important book makes a major contribution....Opens up new vistas for exploration."--Choice
"Clark's important book makes a major contribution....Opens up new vistasfor exploration."--Choice
"Clark's is the most thorough reading to date of the genesis of colonial newspapers up to 1740."--Journal of Communications
"Clark's is the most thorough reading to date of the genesis of colonialnewspapers up to 1740."--Journal of Communications
"Here is welcome news for those interested in the history of early American newspapers, a subject still dominated by poorly written books reverently celebrating journalistic ancestors. Charles E. Clark combines an accomplished professional historian's interdisciplinary methods with ahobbyist's interest in the technology of the hand press, along with insights from his earlier career in journalism. He has given us a convincing synthesis, an admirable monograph, and a reliable base from which to explore numerous issues."--The Journal of American History
"Here is welcome news for those interested in the history of earlyAmerican newspapers, a subject still dominated by poorly written booksreverently celebrating journalistic ancestors. Charles E. Clark combines anaccomplished professional historian's interdisciplinary methods with ahobbyist's interest in the technology of the hand press, along with insightsfrom his earlier career in journalism. He has given us a convincing synthesis,an admirable monograph, and a reliable base from which to explore numerousissues."--The Journal of American History
"The author makes several well-grounded and thought-provoking observations which reveal much about life in colonial America."--Pennsylvania History
"This important study will be of great value both to those interested in early American history and to students of the early press....This is an effective work, impressive in scholarship, convincing in argument....His book deserves to be read widely."--William and Mary Quarterly
"This important study will be of great value both to those interested inearly American history and to students of the early press....This is aneffective work, impressive in scholarship, convincing in argument....His bookdeserves to be read widely."--William and Mary Quarterly
"Clark's important book makes a major contribution....Opens up new vistas for exploration."--Choice"[Clark] provides a strong and focussed survey of the earliest newspapers in American history....Will prove an invaluable library addition for any institution with strong journalism history sections."--The Midwest Book Review"Charles E. Clark offers the first extensive overview of Anglo-American newspapers through 1740....The Public Prints is readable and enriched by many important insights."--Business History Review"Clark's authoritative handling of his subject and comprehensive knowledge of the journalist's craft makes this an excellent resource for media scholars and for literary, cultural, and social historians interested in colonial newspapers' role in cultural development."--The Historian"This important study will be of great value both to those interested in early American history and to students of the early press....This is an effective work, impressive in scholarship, convincing in argument....His book deserves to be read widely."--William and Mary Quarterly"Clark's is the most thorough reading to date of the genesis of colonial newspapers up to 1740."--Journal of Communications"The author makes several well-grounded and thought-provoking observations which reveal much about life in colonial America."--Pennsylvania History"Clark is to be commended for an impressive display of primary research that covers newspapers from three newspaper centers (Boston, New York, and Philadelphia) as well as other towns....Overall the book is worth attention."--American Studies International"Here is welcome news for those interested in the history of early American newspapers, a subject still dominated by poorly written books reverently celebrating journalistic ancestors. Charles E. Clark combines an accomplished professional historian's interdisciplinary methods with a hobbyist's interest in the technology of the hand press, along with insights from his earlier career in journalism. He has given us a convincing synthesis, an admirable monograph,and a reliable base from which to explore numerous issues."--The Journal of American History"[An] extensively researched book....A carefully researched and well-written study...should be of interest to both general readers and more specialized scholars. For library historians, Clark offers an understanding of what is probably the most important reading material for most colonial Americans outside of the Bible and the almanac. For students of U.S. history, Clark's work provides insights into the place of the newspaper in colonial culture and how itdeveloped its important role as primary disseminator of essential political information."--Library & Culture"This is a very accessible and valuable work....lucid and fascinating....a major contribution....this is a fine work, and well worth reading."--American Historical Review"...an important history....although this excellent study is geared primarily for the scholar, anyone interested in the history of newspapers or the relationship between the media and society will find it fascinating reading."--History"This is a valuable, scholarly book that goes into much detail about the process of publishing than do more general works....Clark's footnotes indicate a thorough knowledge, not only of the sources but of all the literature of this subject as well."--New York History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1994
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Summaries
Long Description
The Public Prints is the first comprehensive study of the role of the earliest American newspapers in the society and culture of the eighteenth century. In the hands of Charles E. Clark, American newspaper publishing becomes a branch of the English world of print in a story that begins in the bustling streets of late seventeenth-century London and moves to the provincial towns of England and across the Atlantic. While Clark's most detailed attention in America is to thethree multi-newspaper towns of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, evidence from Williamsburg, Charleston, and Barbados also contributes to generalizations about the craft and business of eighteenth-century publishing. Stressing continuing trans-Atlantic connections as well as English origins, Clark argues thatthe newspapers were a force both for 'anglicization' in their attempts to replicate English culture in America and for 'Americanization' in creating a fuller awareness of the British-American experience across colonial boundaries. He suggests, finally, that the newspapers' greatest cultural role in provincial America was the creation of a community bound by the celebration of common values and attachments through the shared ritual of reading.
Main Description
Newspapers reflect the world as perceived by its writers and readers. They illustrate assumptions in a society about the nature of news and history, the practice of certain literary styles, the political and commercial structure of communities, and the larger process by which culture is transmitted and transformed. Comprehensive in scope and narrative in style, The Public Prints is the first study of the role of the earliest newspapers in eighteenth-century American society and culture. In the hands of Charles E. Clark, American newspaper publishing becomes a branch of the English world of print in a story that begins in the bustling streets of late-seventeenth-century London and moves to the provincial towns of England and across the Atlantic. While Clarks most detailed attention in America is to the three multi-newspaper towns of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, evidence from Williamsburg, Charleston, and Barbados also contributes to generalizations about the craft and business of eighteenth-century publishing. With the newspaper, Clark finds, English-speaking peoples on both sides of the Atlantic found an instrument of commerce, politics, literature, and an awareness of themselves and the world. By the middle of the eighteenth century, the newspaper occupied an accepted and essential niche in the social ecology of both Britain and British America. Stressing the continuous trans-Atlantic connections as well as English origins, Clark argues that the newspapers were a force both for "anglicization" in their attempts to replicate English culture in America and for "Americanization" in creating a fuller awareness of the British-American experience across colonial boundaries. Bybroadening access to current information and by dignifying in print the familiar concerns of everyday life, the newspapers offered a kind of open communion. Ordinary readers were invited into what was previously a privileged circle, sharing in the ritual of communal identity i
Main Description
The first comprehensive study of the nature of the first American newspapers and their role in the society and culture of the eighteenth century, this book examines the development of the newspaper, arguing that its most significant function was the creation of a community bound by the celebration of common values and attachments through the shared ritual of reading.
Main Description
The Public Prints is the first comprehensive study of the role of the earliest American newspapers in the society and culture of the eighteenth century. In the hands of Charles E. Clark, American newspaper publishing becomes a branch of the English world of print in a story that begins in thebustling streets of late seventeenth-century London and moves to the provincial towns of England and across the Atlantic. While Clark's most detailed attention in America is to the three multi-newspaper towns of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, evidence from Williamsburg, Charleston, and Barbadosalso contributes to generalizations about the craft and business of eighteenth-century publishing. Stressing continuing trans-Atlantic connections as well as English origins, Clark argues that the newspapers were a force both for "anglicization" in their attempts to replicate English culture inAmerica and for "Americanization" in creating a fuller awareness of the British-American experience across colonial boundaries. He suggests, finally, that the newspapers' greatest cultural role in provincial America was the creation of a community bound by the celebration of common values andattachments through the shared ritual of reading.
Main Description
The Public Prints is the first comprehensive study of the role of the earliest American newspapers in the society and culture of the eighteenth century. In the hands of Charles E. Clark, American newspaper publishing becomes a branch of the English world of print in a story that begins in the bustling streets of late seventeenth-century London and moves to the provincial towns of England and across the Atlantic. While Clark's most detailed attention in America is to the three multi-newspaper towns of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, evidence from Williamsburg, Charleston, and Barbados also contributes to generalizations about the craft and business of eighteenth-century publishing. Stressing continuing trans-Atlantic connections as well as English origins, Clark argues that the newspapers were a force both for "anglicization" in their attempts to replicate English culture in America and for "Americanization" in creating a fuller awareness of the British-American experience across colonial boundaries. He suggests, finally, that the newspapers' greatest cultural role in provincial America was the creation of a community bound by the celebration of common values and attachments through the shared ritual of reading.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Artifactp. 3
English Backgrounds
Genealogyp. 15
The Metropolisp. 32
The Provincesp. 55
America: Narrative
John Campbell, Pioneer American Newspaperman, 1704-1719p. 77
Competition, 1719-1732p. 103
The Couranteers, 1721-1726p. 123
"A Fine Taste for Good Sense and Polite Learning": The Literary Newspaper, 1727-1735p. 141
Three Cities: A Richer Tapestry, 1728-1740p. 165
America: Structures and Transition
The Printer as Publisherp. 193
The Ritual: The Reader's Worldp. 215
The Newspaper in Culturep. 243
The Transitionp. 258
Appendixp. 267
Notesp. 269
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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