Catalogue


Beowulf [electronic resource] : the fight at Finnsburh /
translated by Kevin Crossley-Holland ; edited with an introduction and notes by Heather O'Donoghue.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
description
xxxviii, 128 p. : map
ISBN
0192833200 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0192833200 (Paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed June 17, 2008).
catalogue key
7372137
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 108-124).
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The poem has at last found its translator...supremely well done.--Charles Causley
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Beowulf is an epic poem from Anglo-Saxon times. It celebrates the virtues of the heroic life and concerns Hrothgar and Beowulf who are beacons of wisdom and courage in a dark world of feuds, violence and uncertainty.
Long Description
The finest literary work passed down to us from Anglo-Saxon times, Beowulf celebrates the existence of heroism in a dark world of feuds, violence, and uncertainty. Set in the legendary Scandinavian past, Beowulf comes to the aid of the Danish king Hrothgar by killing the terrifying monster Grendel and its vengeful mother. A lifetime later, Beowulf courageously prepares for another great battle when a fiery dragon threatens his own kingdom. This acclaimed translation contains a critical introduction, a full index of names, and extensive notes.
Main Description
Beowulf is the longest and finest literary work to have come down to us from Anglo-Saxon times, and one of the world's greatest epic poems. Set in the half-legendary, half historical Scandinavian past, it tells the story of the hero Beowulf, who comes to the aid of the Danish king Hrothgar bykilling first the terrifying, demonic monster Grendel, and then Grendel's infuriated and vengeful mother. A lifetime later, Beowulf's own kingdom, Geatland, is threatened by a fiery dragon; Beowulf heroically takes on this challenge, but himself dies killing the dragon. The poem celebrates the virtues of the heroic life, but Hrothgar and Beowulf are beacons of wisdom and courage in a dark world of feuds, violence and uncertainty, and Beowulf's selfless heroism is set against a background of ruthless power struggles, fratricide and tyranny. This acclaimedtranslation is complemented by a critical introduction and substantial editorial apparatus. 'The poem has at last found its translator . . .supremely well done' Charles Causley
Table of Contents
Includes: Introduction
Textual Note
Bibliography
Time Chart
Genealogical Tables
Map
Explanatory Notes
Index of Names
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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