Catalogue


Native American tribalism [electronic resource] : Indian survivals and renewals /
D'Arcy McNickle.
imprint
New York : Published for the Institute of Race Relations, London by Oxford University Press, 1993.
description
xxvi, 182 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0195084225 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Published for the Institute of Race Relations, London by Oxford University Press, 1993.
isbn
0195084225 (Paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7372136
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A classic treatise about the ability of Native Americans to maintaintheir cultural identity despite 500 years of cultural oppression."--Gregory R.Campbell, University of Montana
"A classic treatise about the ability of Native Americans to maintain their cultural identity despite 500 years of cultural oppression."--Gregory R. Campbell, University of Montana
"A great book!"--Charles Cambridge, University of Colorado atBoulder
"A great book!"--Charles Cambridge, University of Colorado at Boulder
"An affordable reprint of a true classic on the trail of Indian history. Iverson's introduction is useful in placing McNickle's work in its progressive context."--Books of the Southwest
"An excellent, concise treatment of Native American-U.S. Governmentrelations."--Douglas D. Anderson, Brown University
"An excellent, concise treatment of Native American-U.S. Government relations."--Douglas D. Anderson, Brown University
"As terrific as it ever was. Shows that Native Americans are not artifactsof the past, but part of a vibrant, surviving culture."--Larry Zimmerman,University of South Dakota
"As terrific as it ever was. Shows that Native Americans are not artifacts of the past, but part of a vibrant, surviving culture."--Larry Zimmerman, University of South Dakota
"Brief but still comprehensive. The illustrations are excellent. Overall,a solid work as an introduction to the history of Indian tribes from colonialtimes to the 1970s."--S. Carol Berg, College of St. Benedict
"Brief but still comprehensive. The illustrations are excellent. Overall, a solid work as an introduction to the history of Indian tribes from colonial times to the 1970s."--S. Carol Berg, College of St. Benedict
"I am glad to have this old "classic" in an accessible newreprinting."--C.I. Mason, University of Wisconsin
"I am glad to have this old "classic" in an accessible new reprinting."--C.I. Mason, University of Wisconsin
"Offers a valuable perspective from an important period of challenges forthe tribes of North America."--Howard Meredith, University of Science and Artsof Oklahoma
"Offers a valuable perspective from an important period of challenges for the tribes of North America."--Howard Meredith, University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
"One of the best books I've seen on the subject."--Steven Kane,RISD
"One of the best books I've seen on the subject."--Steven Kane, RISD
"One of the best books I've seen on the subject."--Steven Kane, RISD "A classic treatise about the ability of Native Americans to maintain their cultural identity despite 500 years of cultural oppression."--Gregory R. Campbell, University of Montana "I am glad to have this old "classic" in an accessible new reprinting."--C.I. Mason, University of Wisconsin "As terrific as it ever was. Shows that Native Americans are not artifacts of the past, but part of a vibrant, surviving culture."--Larry Zimmerman, University of South Dakota "Offers a valuable perspective from an important period of challenges for the tribes of North America."--Howard Meredith, University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma "An excellent, concise treatment of Native American-U.S. Government relations."--Douglas D. Anderson, Brown University "Brief but still comprehensive. The illustrations are excellent. Overall, a solid work as an introduction to the history of Indian tribes from colonial times to the 1970s."--S. Carol Berg, College of St. Benedict "An affordable reprint of a true classic on the trail of Indian history. Iverson's introduction is useful in placing McNickle's work in its progressive context."--Books of the Southwest
"One of the best books I've seen on the subject."--Steven Kane, RISD "A classic treatise about the ability of Native Americans to maintain their cultural identity despite 500 years of cultural oppression."--Gregory R. Campbell, University of Montana "I am glad to have this old "classic" in an accessible new reprinting."--C.I. Mason, University of Wisconsin "As terrific as it ever was. Shows that Native Americans are not artifacts of the past, but part of a vibrant, surviving culture."--Larry Zimmerman, University of South Dakota "Offers a valuable perspective from an important period of challenges for the tribes of North America."--Howard Meredith, University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma "An excellent, concise treatment of Native American-U.S. Government relations."--Douglas D. Anderson, Brown University "Brief but still comprehensive. The illustrations are excellent. Overall, a solid work as an introduction to the history of Indian tribes from colonial times to the 1970s."--S. Carol Berg, College of St. Benedict "An affordable reprint of a true classic on the trail of Indian history. Iverson's introduction is useful in placing McNickle's work in its progressive context."-- Books of the Southwest
"One of the best books I've seen on the subject."--Steven Kane,RISD "A classic treatise about the ability of Native Americans to maintain their cultural identity despite 500 years of cultural oppression."--Gregory R. Campbell,University of Montana "I am glad to have this old "classic" in an accessible new reprinting."--C.I. Mason,University of Wisconsin "As terrific as it ever was. Shows that Native Americans are not artifacts of the past, but part of a vibrant, surviving culture."--Larry Zimmerman,University of South Dakota "Offers a valuable perspective from an important period of challenges for the tribes of North America."--Howard Meredith,University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma "An excellent, concise treatment of Native American-U.S. Government relations."--Douglas D. Anderson,Brown University "Brief but still comprehensive. The illustrations are excellent. Overall, a solid work as an introduction to the history of Indian tribes from colonial times to the 1970s."--S. Carol Berg,College of St. Benedict "An affordable reprint of a true classic on the trail of Indian history. Iverson's introduction is useful in placing McNickle's work in its progressive context."--Books of the Southwest
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Contrary to the white man's early expectations, the Indian tribes of North America neither vanished nor assimilated. Despite almost four hundred years of contact with the dominant--and often domineering--Western civilization, Native Americans have maintained their cultural identity, the size, social organization, and frequently the location of their population, and their unique position before the law. Now brought up to date with a new introduction by Peter Iverson, this classic book reviews the history of contact between whites and Indians, explaining how the aboriginal inhabitants of North America have managed to remain an ethnic and cultural enclave within American and Canadian society from colonial times to the present day. The late D'Arcy McNickle--renowned anthropologist and member of the Flathead Tribe of Montana--shows that while Native Americans have always been eager to adopt the knowledge and technology of white society, they carefully adapt these changes to fit into their own culture. He maintains that by emphasizing tribal self-determination, the federal government can best help Native Americans to modernize and achieve independence even as they preserve their ancient heritage. Iverson's introduction to the new edition discusses McNickle's singular contribution to Native American Studies, and provides an overview of recent events and scholarship in the field. He has also brought up to date the appendix describing the geographical distribution of the principle tribes in the United States and Canada. With its comprehensive coverage and unique perspective, the new edition of Native American Tribalism is essential reading for those who want to understand the past and present of our first Americans.
Long Description
This is a reissue of Native American Tribalism with a new Introduction by Peter Iverson. In this book the late D'Arcy McNickle, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Saskatchewan, member of the Flathead Tribe of Montana, and founding member of the National Congress of American Indians reviews the history of almost four hundred years of contact between North American Indians and the dominant - and often domineering - Western civilization. McNickle shows that contrary to the white man's early expectations, the Indians of North America have maintained their cultural identity, social organization, size, locations of their population, and unique position before the law. He points out that even while stigmatized with the generalization of being an inferior race, harsh treatment by the white North American cultures, and severe obstacles such as epidemics of small pox, Indians have managed to remain an ethnic cultural enclave within American and Canadian society from colonial times through the present. McNickle maintains that Indians are eager to adopt knowledge and technology from the white society, but they want to fit these changes into their own culture. He argues that by emphasizing tribal self-determination, the federal government can best help Indians to modernize and achieve independence while maintaining their ancient heritage. Peter Iverson's Introduction discusses McNickle's contribution to Native American studies and provides an overview of recent events and scholarship in the field. He has also updated the appendix describing the geographical distribution of the principle tribes in the United States and Canada.
Main Description
Contrary to the white man's early expectations, the Indian tribes of North America neither vanished nor assimilated. Despite almost four hundred years of contact with the dominant--and often domineering--Western civilization, Native Americans have maintained their cultural identity, the size,social organization, and frequently the location of their population, and their unique position before the law. Now brought up to date with a new introduction by Peter Iverson, this classic book reviews the history of contact between whites and Indians, explaining how the aboriginal inhabitants ofNorth America have managed to remain an ethnic and cultural enclave within American and Canadian society from colonial times to the present day. The late D'Arcy McNickle--renowned anthropologist and member of the Flathead Tribe of Montana--shows that while Native Americans have always been eager to adopt the knowledge and technology of white society, they carefully adapt these changes to fit into their own culture. He maintains thatby emphasizing tribal self-determination, the federal government can best help Native Americans to modernize and achieve independence even as they preserve their ancient heritage. Iverson's introduction to the new edition discusses McNickle's singular contribution to Native American Studies, andprovides an overview of recent events and scholarship in the field. He has also brought up to date the appendix describing the geographical distribution of the principle tribes in the United States and Canada. With its comprehensive coverage and unique perspective, the new edition of Native American Tribalism is essential reading for those who want to understand the past and present of our first Americans.
Unpaid Annotation
Contrary to the white man's early expectations, the Indian tribes of North America neither vanished nor assimilated. Despite almost 400 years of contact with the dominant--and usually domineering--Western civilization, Native Americans have maintained their cultural identity, the size, social organization, and frequently the location of their population, and their unique position before the law. Now brought up to date with a new introduction by Peter Iverson, this classic book reviews the history of contact between whites and Indians, explaining how the aboriginal inhabitants of North America have managed to remain an ethnic and cultural enclave within American and Canadian society from colonial times to the present day. The late D'Arcy McNickle--renowned anthropologist and member of the Flathead Tribe of Montana--shows that while Native Americans have always been eager to adopt the knowledge and technology of white society, they carefully adapt these changes to fit into their own culture. Iverson's introduction discusses McNickle's singular contribution to Native American Studies, and provides an overview of recent events and scholarship in the field. With its comprehensive coverage and unique perspective, the new edition of "Native American Tribalism" is essential reading for those who want to understand the past and present of our first Americans.
Table of Contents
A Generalized Viewp. 3
Colonial Antecedentsp. 26
The Formative Yearsp. 48
Years of Attritionp. 69
A Time of Reassessmentp. 87
Return to Negationp. 97
The Tribal Worldp. 113
Travail in the Northp. 134
Epilogue in Alaskap. 151
A Closing Viewp. 166
Appendix: Ten Largest American Indian Tribes for States With 1,000 or More of the Specified Tribep. 172
The Twenty Largest Bands in Canadap. 174
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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