Catalogue


The myth of property [electronic resource] : toward an egalitarian theory of ownership /
John Christman.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1994.
description
ix, 219 p.
ISBN
0195085949 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
subject
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1994.
isbn
0195085949 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7372135
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-214) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-01:
This exceptional study critiques current ideas of property ownership and forcefully advocates a society based on sharply separating rights of control over property from rights to income associated with property. Though property has been much discussed, Christman is strikingly original. He surveys legal, philosophical, political, psychological, and economic views with authority. Four aspects of property rights are distinguished: the holder, the modality, the role of other persons, and the object. The criticisms of the usual arguments for "liberal ownership" (Locke, Friedman, Nozick, and Epstein) are persuasive; Ayn Rand could have been included. Christman's return to French social theorist P.-J. Proudhon is enlightening. The defense of market socialism is a natural outgrowth of the considerations on property, but it is only partially developed; Christman is aware that a fuller treatment would require replies to sophisticated forms of the Russian quip, "Market socialism makes as much sense as being half-pregnant." Both defenders and detractors of property rights should study Christman's trenchant analysis. Though not long, the book is too dense to be fully appreciated on first reading. Highly recommended for those seriously interested in rights to property. Upper-division undergraduate; graduate. D. Christie; University of New Hampshire
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An interesting alternative approach to the analysis of property and ownership rights....Even if one does not accept the author's...views... there is much to like about this book....This book is worthwhile reading for anyone interested in the theory of property rights and its relation to theeconomic policy process."--Journal of Economic Literature
"An interesting alternative approach to the analysis of property andownership rights....Even if one does not accept the author's...views... there ismuch to like about this book....This book is worthwhile reading for anyoneinterested in the theory of property rights and its relation to the economicpolicy process."--Journal of Economic Literature
"This exceptional study...is strikingly original....Both defenders and detractors of property rights should study Christman's trenchant analysis....Highly recommended for those seriously interested in rights to property."--Choice
"This exceptional study...is strikingly original....Both defenders anddetractors of property rights should study Christman's trenchantanalysis....Highly recommended for those seriously interested in rights toproperty."--Choice
"This exceptional study...is strikingly original....Both defenders and detractors of property rights should study Christman's trenchant analysis....Highly recommended for those seriously interested in rights to property."--Choice "An interesting alternative approach to the analysis of property and ownership rights....Even if one does not accept the author's...views... there is much to like about this book....This book is worthwhile reading for anyone interested in the theory of property rights and its relation to the economic policy process."--Journal of Economic Literature
"This exceptional study...is strikingly original....Both defenders and detractors of property rights should study Christman's trenchant analysis....Highly recommended for those seriously interested in rights to property."-- Choice "An interesting alternative approach to the analysis of property and ownership rights....Even if one does not accept the author's...views... there is much to like about this book....This book is worthwhile reading for anyone interested in the theory of property rights and its relation to the economic policy process."-- Journal of Economic Literature
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The Myth of Property is the first book-length study to focus directly on the variable and complex structure of ownership. It critically analyses what it means to own something, and it takes familiar debates about distributive justice and recasts them into discussions of the structure of ownership. The traditional notion of private property assumed by both defenders and opponents of that system is criticized and exposed as a "myth." The book then puts forward a new theory of what it means to own something, one that will be important for any theory of distributive justice. This new approach more adequately reveals the disparate social and individual values that property ownership serves to promote. The study has importance for understanding the reform of capitalist and welfare state systems, as well as the institution of market economies in former socialist states, for the view developed here makes the traditional dichotomy between private ownership capitalism and public ownership socialism obsolete. This new approach to ownership also places egalitarian principles of distributive justice in a new light and challenges critics to clarify aspects of property ownership worth protecting against calls for greater equality. The book closes by showing how defenders of egalitarianism can make use of some of the ideas and values that traditionally made private property appear to be such a pervasive human institution.
Main Description
The Myth of Property is the first book-length study to focus directly on the variable and complex structure of ownership. It critically analyzes what it means to own something, and it takes familiar debates about distributive justice and recasts them into discussions of the structure ofownership. The traditional notion of private property assumed by both defenders and opponents of that system is criticized and exposed as a "myth." The book then puts forward a new theory of what it means to own something, one that will be important for any theory of distributive justice. This newapproach more adequately reveals the disparate social and individual values that property ownership serves to promote. The study has importance for understanding the reform of capitalist and welfare state systems, as well as the institution of market economies in former socialist states, for theview developed here makes the traditional dichotomy between private ownership capitalism and public ownership socialism obsolete. This new approach to ownership also places egalitarian principles of distributive justice in a new light and challenges critics to clarify aspects of property ownershipworth protecting against calls for greater equality. The book closes by showing how defenders of egalitarianism can make use of some of the ideas and values that traditionally made private property appear to be such a pervasive human institution.
Main Description
The Myth of Property is the first book-length study to focus directly on the variable and complex structure of ownership. It critically analyzes what it means to own something, and it takes familiar debates about distributive justice and recasts them into discussions of the structure of ownership. The traditional notion of private property assumed by both defenders and opponents of that system is criticized and exposed as a "myth." The book then puts forward a new theory of what it means to own something, one that will be important for any theory of distributive justice. This new approach more adequately reveals the disparate social and individual values that property ownership serves to promote. The study has importance for understanding the reform of capitalist and welfare state systems, as well as the institution of market economies in former socialist states, for the view developed here makes the traditional dichotomy between private ownership capitalism and public ownership socialism obsolete. This new approach to ownership also places egalitarian principles of distributive justice in a new light and challenges critics to clarify aspects of property ownership worth protecting against calls for greater equality. The book closes by showing how defenders of egalitarianism can make use of some of the ideas and values that traditionally made private property appear to be such a pervasive human institution.
Unpaid Annotation
The first book-length study to focus directly on the variable and complex structure of ownership, The Myth of Property critically analyzes what it means to own something, taking on familiar debates about distributive justice and recasting them into discussions of the structure of ownership.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 3
The Structure of Ownership
What, If Anything, Is Ownership?p. 15
Ownership and the Structure of the Economyp. 28
Attempts to Justify Liberal Ownership
Can Liberal Ownership Be Justified by Natural Rights?p. 47
Liberty and Liberal Ownershipp. 67
Ownership, Markets, and Moral Desertp. 84
Ownership and the Maximization of Utilityp. 98
A New Model of Ownership
The Abandonment of Liberal Ownershipp. 125
Self-Ownershipp. 147
Toward an Egalitarian Theory of Ownershipp. 161
Notesp. 185
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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