Catalogue


Adams vs. Jefferson [electronic resource] : the tumultuous election of 1800 /
John Ferling.
imprint
New York ; Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
xx, 260 p. : ill., maps, ports.
ISBN
0195167716 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York ; Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
0195167716 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7371988
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-250) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
John Ferling is Professor Emeritus of History at the State University of West Georgia. A leading authority on American Revolutionary history, he has appeared in many documentaries and has written numerous books, including John Adams: A Life, The First of Men: A Life of George Washington, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington, Adams, and Jefferson in the American Revolution, and the award-winning A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-10-15:
Ferling (history, Univ. of West Georgia; John Adams: A Life) presents a lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as President in 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that national politics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that the election of 2000 was the most controversial will be struck to learn that political rivalries in the 1790s were even dirtier. In marked contrast to Susan Dunn (Jefferson's Second Revolution: The Election Crisis of 1800 and the Triumph of Republicanism), who sees Jefferson's election as a victory for the political process and the peaceful transfer of power from one party to another, Ferling concludes that Jefferson's election resulted from a secret deal with Federalists. This book does not cover any new ground, but general readers will find it exciting, clear, and instructive. Recommended for all public libraries.-T.J. Schaeper, St. Bonaventure Univ., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2005-05-01:
Historian Ferling (State Univ. of West Georgia; Setting the World Ablaze, CH, Jan'01, 38-2909; A Leap in the Dark, CH, Feb'04, 41-3627) continues his study of early US political development with this account of the controversial election of 1800, which he maintains introduced egalitarian democracy to a conservative centralized government. After offering sketches of the major players--Adams, C. C. Pinckney, Hamilton, Jefferson, Burr, and Madison--Ferling describes the tumultuous and polarizing political atmosphere of the 1790s. By 1800, Adams's popularity had waned; Republicans had successfully portrayed Federalists as monarchial Anglophiles, giving Jefferson a chance to restore the principles of the Revolution. And while both sides used the press to vilify their opponents during this rancorous and negative campaign, Hamilton delivered the most devastating blow by publicly attacking Adams in a 54-page pamphlet. Jefferson and Burr subsequently tied in the electoral vote, throwing the contest into the House of Representatives and almost prompting a civil war. After dozens of ballots, a secret deal changed a single vote, ultimately giving the election to Jefferson. The Revolution of 1800, as Jefferson referred to the election, dramatically altered the political direction for the country and, according to Ferling, created a more egalitarian nation. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. G. A. Smith Texas Christian University
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-08-02:
Veteran historian Ferling's account of one of America's most extraordinary political dramas lays bare the historically pugilist nature of American presidential politics. In 1800 the nation was struggling to its feet amidst an array of threats from foreign governments and a host of constitutional struggles. Against this backdrop, President John Adams, an elite, strong-willed Federalist, set to square off against his vice president, Thomas Jefferson, a populist Republican. The campaign was brutal. Republicans assailed the Federalists as scare-mongers. Federalists attacked Republicans as godless. But it was a constitutional quirk that nearly collapsed the nascent United States. Adams was eliminated, but Jefferson and his vice-presidential running mate, Aaron Burr, tied in the Electoral College with 73 votes, throwing the decision into the House of Representatives. That left the Federalist-dominated House to decide between two despised Republicans for president. After 36 votes, a political deal finally gave Jefferson the presidency, ending a standoff that had the nation on the brink of collapse. Although his account is dense at times, Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well as a vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battles of our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton. In what has already proven to be a vicious 2004 campaign, readers will take some comfort in knowing that the vagaries of the political process, although no doubt exacerbated today by mass media, have changed little in over 200 years. Of even greater comfort, and Ferling's ultimate triumph, is showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through. B&w illus., maps. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as President in 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that national politics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that the election of 2000 was the most controversial will be struck to learn that politicalrivalries in the 1790s were even dirtier.... General readers will find it exciting, clear, and instructive."--Library Journal
"A lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as Presidentin 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that nationalpolitics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that the election of 2000 was themost controversial will be struck to learn that political rivalries in the 1790swere even dirtier.... General readers will find it exciting, clear, andinstructive."--Library Journal
"A well-written look at the enigmatic politics and personalities of theearly Republic."--Kirkus Reviews
"A well-written look at the enigmatic politics and personalities of the early Republic."--Kirkus Reviews
"Ferling at his best. It would be hard to find a better guide to the complexities of this very complex election, and Ferling is particularly good at showing just how many contingencies there were.... Useful and lucid."--Herbert Sloan,American Historical Review
"Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanship that lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists in the House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather than Jefferson."--Washington Post
"Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanshipthat lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists inthe House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather thanJefferson."--Washington Post
"Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well as a vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battles of our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton.... Ferling's ultimate triumphis showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)
"Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well asa vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battlesof our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by JamesMadison and Alexander Hamilton.... Ferling's ultimate triumph is showing that,historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, Americandemocracy has pulled through."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)
"Ferling's straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessible to the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller's touch makes many of these figures come alive."--Wilmington News-Journal
"Ferling's straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessibleto the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller's touchmakes many of these figures come alive."--Wilmington News-Journal
"Guiding his reader through the critical time he calls the 'high voltage'1790s, John Ferling makes sense of the crisis mentality that enveloped earlyAmerica. From the 'narrow Squeak' that awarded John Adams the presidency in 1796to 'something new under the sun' that spirited Thomas Jefferson into office fouryears later, Ferling lays out a tempting tale of political life, once againproving himself a careful, clear-headed interpreter of issues andpersonalities."--Andrew Burstein, author of The Inner Jefferson and The Passionsof Andrew Jackson
"Guiding his reader through the critical time he calls the 'high voltage' 1790s, John Ferling makes sense of the crisis mentality that enveloped early America. From the 'narrow Squeak' that awarded John Adams the presidency in 1796 to 'something new under the sun' that spirited ThomasJefferson into office four years later, Ferling lays out a tempting tale of political life, once again proving himself a careful, clear-headed interpreter of issues and personalities."--Andrew Burstein, author of The Inner Jefferson and The Passions of Andrew Jackson
"In Adams vs. Jefferson, the distinguished historian John Ferling offers afascinating narrative of the election of 1800 and demonstrates how that dramaticcontest could have doomed the American experiment in republicanism. Instead, theelection, a far more contentious event than the election of 2000, marked thetrue consolidation of the American Revolution and the triumph of the ideal ofgovernment resting on the consent of the governed." --John K. Alexander, authorof Samuel Adams: America's Revolutionary Politician
"In Adams vs. Jefferson, the distinguished historian John Ferling offers a fascinating narrative of the election of 1800 and demonstrates how that dramatic contest could have doomed the American experiment in republicanism. Instead, the election, a far more contentious event than the electionof 2000, marked the true consolidation of the American Revolution and the triumph of the ideal of government resting on the consent of the governed." --John K. Alexander, author of Samuel Adams: America's Revolutionary Politician
"The 2004 campaign may seem tame after historian Ferling's riveting account of the 1800 presidential race."--USA Today
"The 2004 campaign may seem tame after historian Ferling's rivetingaccount of the 1800 presidential race."--USA Today
"The 2004 campaign may seem tame after historian Ferling's riveting account of the 1800 presidential race."--USA Today "Ferling at his best. It would be hard to find a better guide to the complexities of this very complex election, and Ferling is particularly good at showing just how many contingencies there were.... Useful and lucid."--Herbert Sloan, American Historical Review "The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They were friends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than 50 years. Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made their friendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive them apart."--Los Angeles Times Book Review "Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well as a vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battles of our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton.... Ferling's ultimate triumph is showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanship that lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists in the House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather than Jefferson."--Washington Post "A lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as President in 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that national politics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that theelection of 2000 was the most controversial will be struck to learn that political rivalries in the 1790s were even dirtier.... General readers will find it exciting, clear, and instructive."--Library Journal "A well-written look at the enigmatic politics and personalities of the early Republic."--Kirkus Reviews "This is a stunning book, by far the finest ever on one of the most critical elections in the nation's history. If you thought 2000 was wild, wait until you read John Ferling's vivid and authoritative account of 1800. A brilliant historian and graceful stylist, Ferling topples old and new myths, and restores Jefferson, Adams, and Hamilton to their proper places, while sustaining a lucid and gripping narrative. There is no better concise work on high political drama in the early republic--and on the tortuous and contested emergence of American democracy."--Sean Wilentz, Princeton University "Ferling's straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessible to the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller's touch makes many of these figures come alive."--Wilmington News-Journal "Guiding his reader through the critical time he calls the 'high voltage' 1790s, John Ferling makes sense of the crisis mentality that enveloped early America. From the 'narrow Squeak' that awarded John Adams the presidency in 1796 to 'something new under the sun' that spirited Thomas Jefferson into office four years later, Ferling lays out a tempting tale of political life, once again proving himself a careful, clear-headed interpreter of issues and personalities."--Andrew Burstein, author of The Inner Jefferson andThe Passions of Andrew Jackson "In Adams vs. Jefferson, the distinguished historian John Ferling offers a fascinating narrative of the election of 1800 and demonstrates how that dramatic contest could have doomed the American experiment in republicanism. Instead, the election, a far more contentious event than the election of 2000, marked the true consolidation of the American Revolution and the triumph of the ideal of government resting on the consent of the governed." --John K. Alexander, author of Samuel Adams: America's Revolutionary Politician
"The 2004 campaign may seem tame after historian Ferling's riveting account of the 1800 presidential race."-- USA Today "Ferling at his best. It would be hard to find a better guide to the complexities of this very complex election, and Ferling is particularly good at showing just how many contingencies there were.... Useful and lucid."--Herbert Sloan, American Historical Review "The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They were friends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than 50 years. Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made their friendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive them apart."-- Los Angeles Times Book Review "Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well as a vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battles of our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton.... Ferling's ultimate triumph is showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through."-- Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanship that lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists in the House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather than Jefferson."-- Washington Post "A lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as President in 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that national politics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that the election of 2000 was the most controversial will be struck to learn that political rivalries in the 1790s were even dirtier.... General readers will find it exciting, clear, and instructive."-- Library Journal "A well-written look at the enigmatic politics and personalities of the early Republic."-- Kirkus Reviews "This is a stunning book, by far the finest ever on one of the most critical elections in the nation's history. If you thought 2000 was wild, wait until you read John Ferling's vivid and authoritative account of 1800. A brilliant historian and graceful stylist, Ferling topples old and new myths, and restores Jefferson, Adams, and Hamilton to their proper places, while sustaining a lucid and gripping narrative. There is no better concise work on high political drama in the early republic--and on the tortuous and contested emergence of American democracy."--Sean Wilentz, Princeton University "Ferling's straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessible to the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller's touch makes many of these figures come alive."-- Wilmington News-Journal "Guiding his reader through the critical time he calls the 'high voltage' 1790s, John Ferling makes sense of the crisis mentality that enveloped early America. From the 'narrow Squeak' that awarded John Adams the presidency in 1796 to 'something new under the sun' that spirited Thomas Jefferson into office four years later, Ferling lays out a tempting tale of political life, once again proving himself a careful, clear-headed interpreter of issues and personalities."--Andrew Burstein, author of The Inner Jefferson and The Passions of Andrew Jackson "In Adams vs. Jefferson , the distinguished historian John Ferling offers a fascinating narrative of the election of 1800 and demonstrates how that dramatic contest could have doomed the American experiment in republicanism. Instead, the election, a far more contentious event than the election of 2000, marked the true consolidation of the American Revolution and the triumph of the ideal of government resting on the consent of the governed." --John K. Alexander, author of Samuel Adams: America's Revolutionary Politician
"The 2004 campaign may seem tame after historian Ferling's riveting account of the 1800 presidential race."--USA Today "Ferling at his best. It would be hard to find a better guide to the complexities of this very complex election, and Ferling is particularly good at showing just how many contingencies there were.... Useful and lucid."--Herbert Sloan,American Historical Review "The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They were friends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than 50 years. Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made their friendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive them apart."--Los Angeles Times Book Review "Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well as a vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battles of our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton.... Ferling's ultimate triumph is showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through."--Publishers Weekly(starred review) "Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanship that lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists in the House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather than Jefferson."--Washington Post "A lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as President in 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that national politics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that the election of 2000 was the most controversial will be struck to learn that political rivalries in the 1790s were even dirtier.... General readers will find it exciting, clear, and instructive."--Library Journal "A well-written look at the enigmatic politics and personalities of the early Republic."--Kirkus Reviews "This is a stunning book, by far the finest ever on one of the most critical elections in the nation's history. If you thought 2000 was wild, wait until you read John Ferling's vivid and authoritative account of 1800. A brilliant historian and graceful stylist, Ferling topples old and new myths, and restores Jefferson, Adams, and Hamilton to their proper places, while sustaining a lucid and gripping narrative. There is no better concise work on high political drama in the early republic--and on the tortuous and contested emergence of American democracy."--Sean Wilentz, Princeton University "Ferling's straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessible to the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller's touch makes many of these figures come alive."--Wilmington News-Journal "Guiding his reader through the critical time he calls the 'high voltage' 1790s, John Ferling makes sense of the crisis mentality that enveloped early America. From the 'narrow Squeak' that awarded John Adams the presidency in 1796 to 'something new under the sun' that spirited Thomas Jefferson into office four years later, Ferling lays out a tempting tale of political life, once again proving himself a careful, clear-headed interpreter of issues and personalities."--Andrew Burstein, author ofThe Inner JeffersonandThe Passions of Andrew Jackson "InAdams vs. Jefferson, the distinguished historian John Ferling offers a fascinating narrative of the election of 1800 and demonstrates how that dramatic contest could have doomed the American experiment in republicanism. Instead, the election, a far more contentious event than the election of 2000, marked the true consolidation of the American Revolution and the triumph of the ideal of government resting on the consent of the governed." --John K. Alexander, author ofSamuel Adams: America's Revolutionary Politician
"The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They werefriends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than 50 years.Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made theirfriendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive themapart."--Los Angeles Times Book Review
"The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They were friends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than 50 years. Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made their friendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive themapart."--Los Angeles Times Book Review
"This is a stunning book, by far the finest ever on one of the mostcritical elections in the nation's history. If you thought 2000 was wild, waituntil you read John Ferling's vivid and authoritative account of 1800. Abrilliant historian and graceful stylist, Ferling topples old and new myths, andrestores Jefferson, Adams, and Hamilton to their proper places, while sustaininga lucid and gripping narrative. There is no better concise work on highpolitical drama in the early republic--and on the tortuous and contestedemergence of American democracy."--Sean Wilentz, Princeton University
"This is a stunning book, by far the finest ever on one of the most critical elections in the nation's history. If you thought 2000 was wild, wait until you read John Ferling's vivid and authoritative account of 1800. A brilliant historian and graceful stylist, Ferling topples old and newmyths, and restores Jefferson, Adams, and Hamilton to their proper places, while sustaining a lucid and gripping narrative. There is no better concise work on high political drama in the early republic--and on the tortuous and contested emergence of American democracy."--Sean Wilentz, PrincetonUniversity
"Ferling richly presents the twists and turns of the election, as well as a vivid portrait of a struggling new nation and the bruising political battles of our now revered founding fathers, including the major roles played by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton.... Ferling's ultimate triumph is showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)"This is a stunning book, by far the finest ever on one of the most critical elections in the nation's history. If you thought 2000 was wild, wait until you read John Ferling's vivid and authoritative account of 1800. A brilliant historian and graceful stylist, Ferling topples old and new myths, and restores Jefferson, Adams, and Hamilton to their proper places, while sustaining a lucid and gripping narrative. There is no better concise work on high politicaldrama in the early republic--and on the tortuous and contested emergence of American democracy."--Sean Wilentz, Princeton University"The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They were friends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than 50 years. Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made their friendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive them apart."--Los Angeles Times Book Review"Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanship that lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists in the House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather than Jefferson."--Washington Post"The 2004 campaign may seem tame after historian Ferling's riveting account of the 1800 presidential race."--USA Today"A well-written look at the enigmatic politics and personalities of the early Republic."--Kirkus Reviews"A lively and reliable account of Thomas Jefferson's election as President in 1800, a fiery period in American history. Readers who assume that national politics in the 1990s was the dirtiest ever or that the election of 2000 was the most controversial will be struck to learn that political rivalries in the 1790s were even dirtier.... General readers will find it exciting, clear, and instructive."--Library Journal"Ferling's straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessible to the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller's touch makes many of these figures come alive."--Wilmington News-Journal"Guiding his reader through the critical time he calls the 'high voltage' 1790s, John Ferling makes sense of the crisis mentality that enveloped early America. From the 'narrow Squeak' that awarded John Adams the presidency in 1796 to 'something new under the sun' that spirited Thomas Jefferson into office four years later, Ferling lays out a tempting tale of political life, once again proving himself a careful, clear-headed interpreter of issues andpersonalities."--Andrew Burstein, University of Tulsa, author of The Inner Jefferson and The Passions of Andrew Jackson"In Adams vs. Jefferson, the distinguished historian John Ferling offers a fascinating narrative of the election of 1800 and demonstrates how that dramatic contest could have doomed the American experiment in republicanism. Instead, the election, a far more contentious event than the election of 2000, marked the true consolidation of the American Revolution and the triumph of the ideal of government resting on the consent of the governed." --John K.Alexander, University of Cincinnati, author of Samuel Adams: America's Revolutionary Politician
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, August 2004
Library Journal, October 2004
Washington Post, October 2004
ForeWord Magazine, November 2004
Los Angeles Times, November 2004
ForeWord Magazine, January 2005
Choice, May 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Despite defects in the constitution, the US election of 1800 was significant as it represented the first transfer of power between the outgoing Federalist party and the incoming Republicans. This text plots the most significant developments of this historic election.
Long Description
It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock in the Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse.Adams vs. Jefferson is a gripping account of a true turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. Adams led the Federalists, conservatives who favored a strong central government, and Jefferson led the Republicans, egalitarians who felt the Federalists had betrayed the Revolution of 1776 and were backsliding toward monarchy. The campaign itself was a barroom brawl every bit asruthless as any modern contest, with mud-slinging--Federalists called Jefferson "a howling atheist"--scare tactics, and backstabbing. The low point came when Alexander Hamilton printed a devastating attack on Adams, the head of his own party, in "fifty-four pages of unremitting vilification." The election endedin a stalemate in the Electoral College that dragged on for days and nights and through dozens of ballots. Tensions ran so high that the Republicans threatened civil war if the Federalists denied Jefferson the presidency. Finally a secret deal that changed a single vote gave Jefferson the White House. A devastated Adams left Washington before dawn on Inauguration Day, too embittered even to shake his rival's hand.Jefferson's election, John Ferling concludes, consummated the American Revolution, assuring the democratization of the United States and its true separation from Britain. With magisterial command, Ferling brings to life both the outsize personalities and the hotly contested political questions at stake. He shows not just why this moment was a milestone in U.S. history, but how strongly the issues--and the passions--of 1800 resonate with our own time.
Main Description
It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock in the Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse. Adams vs. Jefferson is a gripping account of a true turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. Adams led the Federalists, conservatives who favored a strong central government, and Jefferson led the Republicans, egalitarians who felt the Federalists had betrayed the Revolution of 1776 and were backsliding toward monarchy. The campaign itself was a barroom brawl every bit as ruthless as any modern contest, with mud-slinging--Federalists called Jefferson "a howling atheist"--scare tactics, and backstabbing. The low point came when Alexander Hamilton printed a devastating attack on Adams, the head of his own party, in "fifty-four pages of unremitting vilification." The election ended in a stalemate in the Electoral College that dragged on for days and nights and through dozens of ballots. Tensions ran so high that the Republicans threatened civil war if the Federalists denied Jefferson the presidency. Finally a secret deal that changed a single vote gave Jefferson the White House. A devastated Adams left Washington before dawn on Inauguration Day, too embittered even to shake his rival's hand. Jefferson's election, John Ferling concludes, consummated the American Revolution, assuring the democratization of the United States and its true separation from Britain. With magisterial command, Ferling brings to life both the outsize personalities and the hotly contested political questions at stake. He shows not just why this moment was a milestone in U.S. history, but how strongly the issues--and the passions--of 1800 resonate with our own time.
Main Description
It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock in the Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse. Adams vs. Jeffersonis a gripping account of a true turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. Adams led the Federalists, conservatives who favored a strong central government, and Jefferson led the Republicans, egalitarians who felt the Federalists had betrayed the Revolution of 1776 and were backsliding toward monarchy. The campaign itself was a barroom brawl every bit as ruthless as any modern contest, with mud-slinging--Federalists called Jefferson "a howling atheist"--scare tactics, and backstabbing. The low point came when Alexander Hamilton printed a devastating attack on Adams, the head of his own party, in "fifty-four pages of unremitting vilification." The election ended in a stalemate in the Electoral College that dragged on for days and nights and through dozens of ballots. Tensions ran so high that the Republicans threatened civil war if the Federalists denied Jefferson the presidency. Finally a secret deal that changed a single vote gave Jefferson the White House. A devastated Adams left Washington before dawn on Inauguration Day, too embittered even to shake his rival's hand. Jefferson's election, John Ferling concludes, consummated the American Revolution, assuring the democratization of the United States and its true separation from Britain. With magisterial command, Ferling brings to life both the outsize personalities and the hotly contested political questions at stake. He shows not just why this moment was a milestone in U.S. history, but how strongly the issues--and the passions--of 1800 resonate with our own time.
Main Description
It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock inthe Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse. Adams vs. Jefferson is a gripping account of a true turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. Adams led the Federalists, conservatives who favored a strong central government, and Jeffersonled the Republicans, egalitarians who felt the Federalists had betrayed the Revolution of 1776 and were backsliding toward monarchy. The campaign itself was a barroom brawl every bit as ruthless as any modern contest, with mud-slinging--Federalists called Jefferson "a howling atheist"--scaretactics, and backstabbing. The low point came when Alexander Hamilton printed a devastating attack on Adams, the head of his own party, in "fifty-four pages of unremitting vilification." The election ended in a stalemate in the Electoral College that dragged on for days and nights and through dozensof ballots. Tensions ran so high that the Republicans threatened civil war if the Federalists denied Jefferson the presidency. Finally a secret deal that changed a single vote gave Jefferson the White House. A devastated Adams left Washington before dawn on Inauguration Day, too embittered even toshake his rival's hand. Jefferson's election, John Ferling concludes, consummated the American Revolution, assuring the democratization of the United States and its true separation from Britain. With magisterial command, Ferling brings to life both the outsize personalities and the hotly contested politicalquestions at stake. He shows not just why this moment was a milestone in U.S. history, but how strongly the issues--and the passions--of 1800 resonate with our own time.
Main Description
It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock in the Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse. Adams vs. Jefferson is the gripping account of a turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. The Federalists, led by Adams, were conservatives who favored a strong central government. The Republicans, led by Jefferson, were more egalitarian and believed that the Federalists had betrayed the Revolution of 1776 and were backsliding toward monarchy. The campaign itself was a barroom brawl every bit as ruthless as any modern contest, with mud-slinging, scare tactics, and backstabbing. The low point came when Alexander Hamilton printed a devastating attack on Adams, the head of his own party, in "fifty-four pages of unremitting vilification." The stalemate in the Electoral College dragged on through dozens of ballots. Tensions ran so high that the Republicans threatened civil war if the Federalists denied Jefferson the presidency. Finally a secret deal that changed a single vote gave Jefferson the White House. A devastated Adams left Washington before dawn on Inauguration Day, too embittered even to shake his rival's hand. With magisterial command, Ferling brings to life both the outsize personalities and the hotly contested political questions at stake. He shows not just why this moment was a milestone in U.S. history, but how strongly the issues--and the passions--of 1800 resonate with our own time.
Table of Contents
Editors' Notep. xi
Illustrations and Mapsp. xiii
Prefacep. xvii
Election Eve, 1800p. 1
"an Affection That Can Never Die"p. 18
Creating the New National System, 1786-1792p. 36
Partisanship, 1793-1796p. 57
Jefferson and Adams on the Eve of the Battle in 1796p. 69
The First Contested Presidential Election, 1796p. 83
The Partisan Inferno, 1797-1798p. 99
Summer 1798 to Autumn 1799p. 113
Winter and Spring, 1800p. 126
The Campaign of 1800p. 135
The Election of 1800p. 162
The House Decides the Electionp. 175
Jefferson's Inaugurationp. 197
Epilogue: "the Revolution of 1800"p. 207
Abbreviationsp. 217
Notesp. 221
Indexp. 251
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