Catalogue


Acting between the lines [electronic resource] : the Field Day Theatre Company and Irish cultural politics, 1980-1984 /
Marilynn J. Richtarik.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c1994.
description
356 p.
ISBN
0198182473 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c1994.
isbn
0198182473 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7371481
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Marilynn J. Richtarik is associate professor of English at Georgia State University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-12:
In 1980 Brian Friel and Stephen Rea founded the Field Day Theatre Company. Based in Derry, Northern Ireland, the company was intended to bring quality theater to communities throughout Ireland and to create a venue where Northern Irish theater artists of all persuasions could work together to create a vision of a shared Irish culture. Richtarik's book, the first in-depth study of Field Day, focuses on the company's activities as it developed from an ad hoc theater operation to an important artistic and cultural institution, and on the company's changing image during the first five years of its existence. Richtarik (Univ. of British Columbia) argues that as long as Field Day's function was primarily artistic, it had a strong position from which to challenge Irish attitudes and prejudices. However, as more of its activities became analytical and theoretical, and as its publishing function expanded, culminating in The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, ed. by Seamus Deane (CH, Apr'92), the company's cultural goals, though progressive and nonsectarian, came to be seen by many as politically biased on the nationalist side. This thorough and evocative exploration of Field Day's various attempts to transcend the cultural, political, and sectarian divisions within Ireland, both north and south, is recommended for academic collections at the upper-division undergraduate level upward. W. M. Tate; Portland State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A facinating critique of the attempt to create a 'fifth province' of the imagination where old tribal shibboleths could be dispensed with... Richtarik's book is an excellent read for those interested in placing language at the centre of their artistic and 'national' agenda.'Theatre Scotland.
'An extremely well-researched and readable account of the first four years of the company's existence'The Irish Times
'Her book is very much a traditional Ph.D. thesis, carefully attentive to reviews of Field day plays, precisely delimited in its thorough coverage of the years 1980-1984...It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the origins and early years of the Field Day project...Richtarik isvery good at exposing some of the contradictions involved in the making of that anthology, and in the whole Field Day project.'Bullan Vol 2 no 1
'Marilynn Richtarik's book is a welcome and well-written study of the individuals and forces which gave life to the Field Day in its first five years.'Times Literary Supplement
'There is a brief but very concise, useful and necessary expose of the political, social and economic circumstances that made Derry the focal point of the early troubles. She ... approaches the Field Day phenomenon with documentary zeal ... Her analyses of the plays are excellent both asdramatic creations in themselves and in the way they touch on issues that relate to the Field Day project. There is a particularly valuable examination of the different responses of audiences and critics watching a performance of Translations in Northern Ireland, the Republic and Britain.'Ulf Dantanus, Irish University Review, 26.1 (Spring/Summer 1996)
"Thorough and evocative."--Choice "A welcome and well-written study of the individuals and forces which gave life to the Field Day in its first five years."--Times Literary Supplement "An extremely well-researched and readable account of the first four years of the company's existence."--The Irish Times "A fascinating critique of the attempt to create a 'fifth province' of the imagination...An excellent read for those interested in placing language at the centre of their artistic and 'national' agenda."--Theatre Scotland
"Thorough and evocative."-- Choice "A welcome and well-written study of the individuals and forces which gave life to the Field Day in its first five years."-- Times Literary Supplement "An extremely well-researched and readable account of the first four years of the company's existence."-- The Irish Times "A fascinating critique of the attempt to create a 'fifth province' of the imagination...An excellent read for those interested in placing language at the centre of their artistic and 'national' agenda."-- Theatre Scotland
'Marilynn Richtarik's book is a welcome and well-written study of the individuals and forces which gave life to the Field Day in its first five years.'Times Literary Supplement'An extremely well-researched and readable account of the first four years of the company's existence'The Irish Times'A facinating critique of the attempt to create a 'fifth province' of the imagination where old tribal shibboleths could be dispensed with... Richtarik's book is an excellent read for those interested in placing language at the centre of their artistic and 'national' agenda.'Theatre Scotland.'Her book is very much a traditional Ph.D. thesis, carefully attentive to reviews of Field day plays, precisely delimited in its thorough coverage of the years 1980-1984...It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the origins and early years of the Field Day project...Richtarik is very good at exposing some of the contradictions involved in the making of that anthology, and in the whole Field Day project.'Bulla'n Vol 2 no 1'There is a brief but very concise, useful and necessary exposé of the political, social and economic circumstances that made Derry the focal point of the early troubles. She ... approaches the Field Day phenomenon with documentary zeal ... Her analyses of the plays are excellent both as dramatic creations in themselves and in the way they touch on issues that relate to the Field Day project. There is a particularly valuable examination of thedifferent responses of audiences and critics watching a performance of Translations in Northern Ireland, the Republic and Britain.'Ulf Dantanus, Irish University Review, 26.1 (Spring/Summer 1996)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Acting Between the Lines is the first full-length study of Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company. Since its creation in 1980 by actor Stephen Rea (The Crying Game) and playwright Brian Friel (Translations, Dancing at Lughnasa), Field Day has established itself as one of the most important elements in contemporary Irish culture. From its base in Northern Ireland, the Company has brought challenging drama to the entire island, 'from Coleraine to Kerry'. With the addition to its board of directors of poets and critics such as Tom Paulin, Seamus Heaney, Seamus Deane, and broadcaster David Hammond, Field Day has ventured into the realm of the more explicitly political with a controversial pamphlet series. Marilynn Richtarik has written a fascinating introduction to Field Day, providing a senstive analysis of the complex interrelationship of Irish history, politics, and culture.
Long Description
Since its creation in 1980 by actor Stephen Rea (The Crying Game) and playwright Brian Friel (Translation, Dancing at Lughnasa), Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company has brought challenging drama to the entire island, "from Coleraine to Kerry." With the addition to the board of directors of poets and critics such as Tom Paulin, Seamus Heaney, and Seamus Deane, Field Day ventured into the realm of the more explicitly political with a controversial pamphlet series. Acting Between the Lines is a fascinating study of one of the most important developments in contemporary Irish culture.
Main Description
Acting Between the Lines is the first full-length study of Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company. Since its creation in 1980 by actor Stephen Rea (The Crying Game) and playwright Brian Friel (Translations, Dancing at Lughnasa), Field Day has established itself as one of the most important elements in contemporary Irish culture. From its base in Northern Ireland, the Company has broughtchallenging drama to the entire island, 'from Coleraine to Kerry'. With the addition to its board of directors of poets and critics such as Tom Paulin, Seamus Heaney, Seamus Deane, and broadcaster David Hammond, Field Day has ventured into the realm of the more explicitly political with acontroversial pamphlet series. Marilynn Richtarik has written a fascinating introduction to Field Day, providing a senstive analysis of the complex interrelationship of Irish history, politics, and culture.
Main Description
Since its creation in 1980 by actor Stephen Rea ( The Crying Game ) and playwright Brian Friel ( Translation, Dancing at Lughnasa ), Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company has brought challenging drama to the entire island, "from Coleraine to Kerry." With the addition to the board of directors of poets and critics such as Tom Paulin, Seamus Heaney, and Seamus Deane, Field Day ventured into the realm of the more explicitly political with a controversial pamphlet series. Acting Between the Lines is a fascinating study of one of the most important developments in contemporary Irish culture.
Main Description
The first full-length study of Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company. Marilynn Richtarik has written a fascinating introduction to Field Day, providing a sensitive analysis of the complex interrelationship of Irish history, politics, and culture.
Unpaid Annotation
Acting Between the Lines is the first full-length study of Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company.
Table of Contents
Foreword to This Editionp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Introduction: Surveying the Fieldp. 3
'The Town I Loved So Well': Derry and the Foundation of Field Dayp. 10
Translations: On the Page and On the Stagep. 28
Six Characters in Search of an Author(ity): The Field Day Board of Directorsp. 65
'Talking to Ourselves': The Early Yearsp. 112
'Not Just A Little Touring Company': Field Day Further Afieldp. 140
Things Done and Left Undone: The Fourth Field Day Tourp. 191
Poets as Playwrights: Field Day's Double Billp. 216
Conclusion: Five Years of Field Day--Fifth Province or Fifth Column?p. 239
Postscriptp. 256
Productions of the Field Day Theatre Company, 1980-4p. 270
Notesp. 271
Bibliographyp. 315
Indexp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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