Catalogue


The flawed architect [electronic resource] : Henry Kissinger and American foreign policy /
Jussi Hanhimäki.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
xxii, 554 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195172213 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
0195172213 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7371373
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [534]-539) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jussi Hanhimaki is Professor of International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-08-09:
Hanhimaki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger, President Nixon's national security adviser and eventually secretary of state. Kissinger's penchant for covert action to undermine governments the administration saw as enemies, such as Chile and Angola, and his employment of secret back channels rather than open diplomacy, were, the author contends, hallmarks of his foreign policy. Hanhimaki, an editor of the journal Cold War History, calls Kissinger's "unapologetic realpolitik" approach to the Soviet Union, China and North Vietnam "morally questionable," though he asserts that Kissinger was not a war criminal. He was, rather, "disappointing" in his short-sightedness, never anticipating the long-term consequences of deals with adversaries, acquiescing, for example, in Indonesia's genocidal takeover of East Timor to placate an anticommunist regime. Although Kissinger had insisted, "The U.S. will not negotiate a surrender of South Vietnam," in effect he did precisely that, winning a shared Nobel Peace Prize. The subsequent bloodbath led to a rare concession from a man who, according to Hanhimaki, valued his credibility above all: ruefully, he offered to return the Peace Prize, but was told he had to keep it ("Rules were rules"). Hanhimaki offers a striking indictment, so it is unfortunate that the many repetitions make his book sometimes tedious and frustrating to read. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-08-01:
Henry Kissinger served concurrently as national security adviser and secretary of state during the Nixon and Ford administrations (1969-1977). He practiced a realist approach to all contemporary issues, including the Vietnam War and the problems of the Middle East, framing them in terms of the triangular tension he perceived among the United States, the Soviet Union, and China. At first, that approach produced significant results, especially the initial opening to China. In later conflicts and those in Third World countries, that same analysis led to unsuccessful strategies. Hanhimaki (Graduate Inst. of International Affairs, Switzerland) has drawn extensively on recently declassified documents to write this complement to Kissinger's three volumes of memoirs. The author's interpretations of events frequently differ from those of his subject. But though the tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh's Price of Power and Marvin and Bernard Kalb's more admiring Kissinger. Recommended, especially for academic libraries. Marcia L. Sprules, Council on Foreign Relations Lib., New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2005-02-01:
Hanhimaki's book on Nixon and Kissinger's foreign policy takes advantage of newly declassified documents in its effort to develop a balanced view of Kissinger's strategic architecture for fighting the Cold War. The author acknowledges the controversy over Kissinger's foreign policy role, policy advice to Nixon, and implementation style, but makes an effort to be objective. While arguing that Kissinger's detente strategy with the USSR was ultimately a failure, Hanhimaki (International Institute, Geneva) sees that failure as a result of the domestic political and institutional context as well as of strategic misjudgments Nixon and Kissinger made. Kissinger's focus on containing the USSR, particularly in the developing world, is identified as perhaps the most important failure of the Kissinger foreign policy strategy, a flaw that undermined the new strategic direction that Nixon and Kissinger had pursued. As an extensive history of the Nixon and Kissinger years, this volume benefits from the author's efforts to be scholarly, rather than political. He is not writing to condemn or praise Kissinger but to assess him as a strategist and diplomat. Hanhimaki presents a welcome addition to the literature on the Nixon-Kissinger years. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. W. W. Newmann Virginia Commonwealth University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Absorbing and rich.... Hanhimaki provides breaking news by revealing Kissinger's efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extracting US forces from Vietnam 'without immediate embarrassment,' meaning he was willing to betray South Vietnam."--Kirkus Reviews
"Absorbing and rich.... Hanhimaki provides breaking news by revealingKissinger's efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extractingUS forces from Vietnam 'without immediate embarrassment,' meaning he was willingto betray South Vietnam."--Kirkus Reviews
"A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastingly controversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in a slew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure, The Flawed Architect gives us the good (detente, the opening to China, theArab-Israeli shuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony of Vietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy and deception all too redolent of Nixon's White House). As the United States struggles anew to find the right balance between Americaninterests and American values, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author of Support Any Friend: Kennedy's Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance
"A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastinglycontroversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in aslew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure, The FlawedArchitect gives us the good (detente, the opening to China, the Arab-Israelishuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony ofVietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy anddeception all too redolent of Nixon's White House). As the United Statesstruggles anew to find the right balance between American interests and Americanvalues, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author ofSupport Any Friend: Kennedy's Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-IsraelAlliance
"A striking indictment. Hanhimaki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)
"A striking indictment. Hanhimaki is one of the most persuasive of themany detractors of Henry Kissinger."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)
"A striking indictment. Hanhimaki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Absorbing and rich.... Hanhimaki provides breaking news by revealing Kissinger's efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extracting US forces from Vietnam 'without immediate embarrassment,' meaning he was willing to betray South Vietnam."--Kirkus Reviews "The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh's Price of Power and Marvin and Bernard Kalb's more admiring Kissinger."--Library Journal "No one can read The Flawed Architect without being impressed by the scope and complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger's desk. He was--as every secretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdain for democracy and impatience with a free press and an active Congress. He sought refuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretapping of his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared to his brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger's globalist vision blinkered him to regional realities and how this undermined the effectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."--Raleigh News & Observer "Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he the creative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was he an imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing his personal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials and brilliantly assessing Kissinger's policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively argues that 'Super-K' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book is essential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War." --Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of American History, University of Virginia "Hanhimaki's study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. The author has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents to explain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and a sure command of materials make this important book a pleasure to read. In short: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatic history." --David Mayers, Boston University "A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastingly controversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in a slew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure, The Flawed Architect gives us the good (detente, the opening to China, the Arab-Israeli shuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony of Vietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy and deception all too redolent of Nixon's White House). As the United States struggles anew to find the right balance between American interests and American values, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author of Support Any Friend: Kennedy's Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance "Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fair and balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those who wish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and its legacies must read this book." --Jeremi Suri, author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Detente "It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945 international affairs. Hanhimaki carefully examines Kissinger's accomplishments, frustrations, and failures in the context of his ideology and personali
"A striking indictment. Hanhimäki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger."-- Publishers Weekly (starred review)"Absorbing and rich.... Hanhimäki provides breaking news by revealing Kissinger's efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extracting US forces from Vietnam 'without immediate embarrassment,' meaning he was willing to betray South Vietnam."-- Kirkus Reviews"The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh's Price of Power and Marvin and Bernard Kalb's more admiring Kissinger ."-- Library Journal"No one can read The Flawed Architect without being impressed by the scope and complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger's desk. He was--as every secretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdain for democracy and impatience with a free press and an active Congress. He sought refuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretapping of his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared to his brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger's globalist vision blinkered him to regional realities and how this undermined the effectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."-- Raleigh News & Observer"Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he the creative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was he an imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing his personal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials and brilliantly assessing Kissinger's policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively argues that 'Super-K' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book is essential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War." --Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of American History, University of Virginia"Hanhimaki's study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. The author has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents to explain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and a sure command of materials make this important book a pleasure to read. In short: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatic history." --David Mayers, Boston University"A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastingly controversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in a slew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure, The Flawed Architect gives us the good (détente, the opening to China, the Arab-Israeli shuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony of Vietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy and deception all too redolent of Nixon's White House). As the United States struggles anew to find the right balance between American interests and American values, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author of Support Any Friend: Kennedy's Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance"Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fair and balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those who wish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and its legacies must read this book." --Jeremi Suri, author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente"It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945 international affairs. Hanhima
"A striking indictment. Hanhimäki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger."-- Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Absorbing and rich.... Hanhimäki provides breaking news by revealing Kissinger's efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extracting US forces from Vietnam 'without immediate embarrassment,' meaning he was willing to betray South Vietnam."-- Kirkus Reviews "The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh's Price of Power and Marvin and Bernard Kalb's more admiring Kissinger ."-- Library Journal "No one can read The Flawed Architect without being impressed by the scope and complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger's desk. He was--as every secretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdain for democracy and impatience with a free press and an active Congress. He sought refuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretapping of his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared to his brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger's globalist vision blinkered him to regional realities and how this undermined the effectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."-- Raleigh News & Observer "Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he the creative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was he an imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing his personal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials and brilliantly assessing Kissinger's policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively argues that 'Super-K' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book is essential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War." --Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of American History, University of Virginia "Hanhimaki's study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. The author has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents to explain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and a sure command of materials make this important book a pleasure to read. In short: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatic history." --David Mayers, Boston University "A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastingly controversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in a slew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure, The Flawed Architect gives us the good (détente, the opening to China, the Arab-Israeli shuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony of Vietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy and deception all too redolent of Nixon's White House). As the United States struggles anew to find the right balance between American interests and American values, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author of Support Any Friend: Kennedy's Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance "Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fair and balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those who wish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and its legacies must read this book." --Jeremi Suri, author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente "It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945 international affairs. Hanhimaki carefully examines Kissinger's accomplishments, frustrations, and
"A striking indictment. Hanhim ki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger."--Publishers Weekly(starred review) "Absorbing and rich.... Hanhim ki provides breaking news by revealing Kissinger''s efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extracting US forces from Vietnam ''without immediate embarrassment,'' meaning he was willing to betray South Vietnam."--Kirkus Reviews "The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh''sPrice of Powerand Marvin and Bernard Kalb''s more admiringKissinger."--LibraryJournal "No one can readThe Flawed Architectwithout being impressed by the scope and complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger''s desk. He was--as every secretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdain for democracy and impatience with a free press and an active Congress. He sought refuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretapping of his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared to his brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger''s globalist vision blinkered him to regional realities and how this undermined the effectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."--Raleigh News & Observer "Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he the creative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was he an imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing his personal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials and brilliantly assessing Kissinger''s policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively argues that ''Super-K'' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book is essential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War." --Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of American History, University of Virginia "Hanhimaki''s study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. The author has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents to explain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and a sure command of materials make this important book a pleasure to read. In short: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatic history." --David Mayers, Boston University "A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastingly controversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in a slew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure,The Flawed Architectgives us the good (d tente, the opening to China, the Arab-Israeli shuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony of Vietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy and deception all too redolent of Nixon''s White House). As the United States struggles anew to find the right balance between American interests and American values, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author ofSupport Any Friend: Kennedy''s Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance "Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account of Henry Kissinger''s diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fair and balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those who wish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and its legacies must read this book." --Jeremi Suri, author ofPower and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of D tente "It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger''s diplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945 international affairs. Hanhimaki carefully examines Kissinger''s accomplishments, frustrations, and failures in the context of his ideology and personality, as well as of his relationship with Richard Nixon and other world leaders." --Akira Iriye, Professor of History, Harvard University
"A striking indictment. Hanhimäki is one of the most persuasive of the many detractors of Henry Kissinger."--Publishers Weekly(starred review) "Absorbing and rich.... Hanhimäki provides breaking news by revealing Kissinger''s efforts throughout the early 1970s to engineer a way of extracting US forces from Vietnam ''without immediate embarrassment,'' meaning he was willing to betray South Vietnam."--Kirkus Reviews "The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh''sPrice of Powerand Marvin and Bernard Kalb''s more admiringKissinger."--LibraryJournal "No one can readThe Flawed Architectwithout being impressed by the scope and complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger''s desk. He was--as every secretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdain for democracy and impatience with a free press and an active Congress. He sought refuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretapping of his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared to his brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger''s globalist vision blinkered him to regional realities and how this undermined the effectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."--Raleigh News & Observer "Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he the creative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was he an imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing his personal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials and brilliantly assessing Kissinger''s policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively argues that ''Super-K'' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book is essential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War." --Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of American History, University of Virginia "Hanhimaki''s study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. The author has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents to explain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and a sure command of materials make this important book a pleasure to read. In short: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatic history." --David Mayers, Boston University "A fine and illuminating reappraisal of one of the most lastingly controversial figures in the history of U.S. foreign policymaking. Rooted in a slew of recently declassified documentation on Kissingers tenure,The Flawed Architectgives us the good (détente, the opening to China, the Arab-Israeli shuttles), the bad (the secret bombing of Cambodia, the protracted agony of Vietnam, the coup in Chile), and the ugly (a tangled web of secrecy and deception all too redolent of Nixon''s White House). As the United States struggles anew to find the right balance between American interests and American values, this book is as timely as it is engrossing." --Warren Bass, author ofSupport Any Friend: Kennedy''s Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance "Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account of Henry Kissinger''s diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fair and balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those who wish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and its legacies must read this book." --Jeremi Suri, author ofPower and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente "It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger''s diplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945 international affairs. Hanhimaki carefully examines Kissinger''s accomplishments, frustrations, and failures in the context of his ideology and personality, as well as of his relationship with Richard Nixon and other world leaders." --Akira Iriye, Professor of History, Harvard University
"Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fair and balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those who wish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and itslegacies must read this book." --Jeremi Suri, author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Detente
"Hanhimaki offers the most detailed, considered, and persuasive account ofHenry Kissinger's diplomacy in print. Most impressive, Hanhimaki offers a fairand balanced judgment of a man who more frequently inspires polemics. Those whowish to understand Henry Kissinger, the Cold War, and its legacies must readthis book." --Jeremi Suri, author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution andthe Rise of Detente
"Hanhimaki's study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. The author has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents to explain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and a sure command of materials make this important book a pleasure toread. In short: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatic history." --David Mayers, Boston University
"Hanhimaki's study of Kissinger in power is first-rate scholarship. Theauthor has mined rich veins of previously unavailable government documents toexplain in detail a controversial set of foreign policies. Crisp prose and asure command of materials make this important book a pleasure to read. Inshort: a splendid contribution to the literature of post-1945 U.S. diplomatichistory." --David Mayers, Boston University
His extensive use of original sources will give this narrative of the Kissinger years a special value for readers.
"It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger's diplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945 international affairs. Hanhimaki carefully examines Kissinger's accomplishments, frustrations, and failures in the context of his ideology andpersonality, as well as of his relationship with Richard Nixon and other world leaders." --Akira Iriye, Professor of History, Harvard University
"It is good to have a full, reliable account of Henry Kissinger'sdiplomacy by a well respected historian who has written extensively on post-1945international affairs. Hanhimaki carefully examines Kissinger's accomplishments,frustrations, and failures in the context of his ideology and personality, aswell as of his relationship with Richard Nixon and other world leaders."--Akira Iriye, Professor of History, Harvard University
"No one can read The Flawed Architect without being impressed by the scope and complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger's desk. He was--as every secretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdain for democracy and impatience with a free press and an activeCongress. He sought refuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretapping of his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared to his brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger's globalist vision blinkered him to regionalrealities and how this undermined the effectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."--Raleigh News and Observer
"No one can read The Flawed Architect without being impressed by the scopeand complexity of the issues that ended up on Kissinger's desk. He was--as everysecretary of state should be--a superb juggler. However, he displayed disdainfor democracy and impatience with a free press and an active Congress. He soughtrefuge in secrecy, back channels and outright lies. He approved the wiretappingof his own staff. Many have considered these failings peccadilloes compared tohis brilliance as a diplomat. By showing us precisely how Kissinger's globalistvision blinkered him to regional realities and how this undermined theeffectiveness of his diplomacy, Hanhimaki makes us think again."--Raleigh Newsand Observer
"The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki gives Kissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealing unpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh's Price of Power and Marvin and Bernard Kalb's more admiring Kissinger."--LibraryJournal
"The tone is critical, it is not at all polemical. Hanhimaki givesKissinger due credit for his very real accomplishments while not concealingunpleasant facts, placing this work midway between Seymour Hersh's Price ofPower and Marvin and Bernard Kalb's more admiring Kissinger."--LibraryJournal
"Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he the creative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was he an imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing his personal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials andbrilliantly assessing Kissinger's policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively argues that 'Super-K' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book is essential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War." --Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of AmericanHistory, University of Virginia
"Was Kissinger a war criminal or a calculating realist? Was he thecreative architect of a new world order or a traditional cold warrior? Was hean imaginative diplomat or a secretive opportunist bent on maximizing hispersonal power? Using a broad array of new archival materials and brilliantlyassessing Kissinger's policies in the Third World, Hanhimaki persuasively arguesthat 'Super-K' was a superb tactician and flawed strategist. This book isessential reading for an understanding of the evolution of the Cold War."--Melvyn P. Leffler, Stettinius Professor of American History, University ofVirginia
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal, August 2004
Publishers Weekly, August 2004
New York Times Book Review, September 2004
Choice, February 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A quarter century after he left office as US Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger remains a household name - a tribute both to his outstanding diplomatic successes & to the continuing controversy over his less laudable policies, such as the backing he gave to Pinochet.
Long Description
Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated détente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombing of Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. Which is more accurate, the picture of Kissinger the skilled diplomat or Kissinger the war criminal? In The Flawed Architect, the first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade, historian Jussi Hanhimaki paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman. Drawing on extensive research from newly declassified files, the author follows Kissinger from his beginnings in the Nixon administration up to the current controversy fed by Christopher Hitchens over whether Kissinger is a war criminal. Hanhimaki guides the reader through White House power struggles and debates behind the Cambodia and Laos invasions, the search for a strategy in Vietnam, the breakthrough with China, and the unfolding of Soviet-American detente. Here, too, are many other international crises of the period--the Indo-Pakistani War, the Yom Kippur War, the Angolan civil war--all set against the backdrop of Watergate. Along the way, Hanhimaki sheds light on Kissinger's personal flaws--he was obsessed with secrecy and bureaucratic infighting in an administration that self-destructed in its abuse of power--as well as his great strengths as a diplomat. We see Kissinger negotiating, threatening and joking with virtually all of the key foreign leaders of the 1970s, from Mao to Brezhnev and Anwar Sadat to Golda Meir. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.
Main Description
Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated detente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombingof Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. Which is more accurate, the picture of Kissinger the skilled diplomat or Kissinger the war criminal? In The Flawed Architect, the first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade, historian Jussi Hanhimaki paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman. Drawing on extensive research from newly declassified files, the author follows Kissinger fromhis beginnings in the Nixon administration up to the current controversy fed by Christopher Hitchens over whether Kissinger is a war criminal. Hanhimaki guides the reader through White House power struggles and debates behind the Cambodia and Laos invasions, the search for a strategy in Vietnam, thebreakthrough with China, and the unfolding of Soviet-American detente. Here, too, are many other international crises of the period--the Indo-Pakistani War, the Yom Kippur War, the Angolan civil war--all set against the backdrop of Watergate. Along the way, Hanhimaki sheds light on Kissinger'spersonal flaws--he was obsessed with secrecy and bureaucratic infighting in an administration that self-destructed in its abuse of power--as well as his great strengths as a diplomat. We see Kissinger negotiating, threatening and joking with virtually all of the key foreign leaders of the 1970s,from Mao to Brezhnev and Anwar Sadat to Golda Meir. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.
Main Description
Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated détente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombing of Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.
Main Description
Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated d tente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombing of Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. Which is more accurate, the picture of Kissinger the skilled diplomat or Kissinger the war criminal? InThe Flawed Architect, the first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade, historian Jussi Hanhimaki paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman. Drawing on extensive research from newly declassified files, the author follows Kissinger from his beginnings in the Nixon administration up to the current controversy fed by Christopher Hitchens over whether Kissinger is a war criminal. Hanhimaki guides the reader through White House power struggles and debates behind the Cambodia and Laos invasions, the search for a strategy in Vietnam, the breakthrough with China, and the unfolding of Soviet-American detente. Here, too, are many other international crises of the period--the Indo-Pakistani War, the Yom Kippur War, the Angolan civil war--all set against the backdrop of Watergate. Along the way, Hanhimaki sheds light on Kissinger's personal flaws--he was obsessed with secrecy and bureaucratic infighting in an administration that self-destructed in its abuse of power--as well as his great strengths as a diplomat. We see Kissinger negotiating, threatening and joking with virtually all of the key foreign leaders of the 1970s, from Mao to Brezhnev and Anwar Sadat to Golda Meir. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.
Main Description
Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated détente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombing of Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. Which is more accurate, the picture of Kissinger the skilled diplomat or Kissinger the war criminal? In The Flawed Architect , the first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade, historian Jussi Hanhimaki paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman. Drawing on extensive research from newly declassified files, the author follows Kissinger from his beginnings in the Nixon administration up to the current controversy fed by Christopher Hitchens over whether Kissinger is a war criminal. Hanhimaki guides the reader through White House power struggles and debates behind the Cambodia and Laos invasions, the search for a strategy in Vietnam, the breakthrough with China, and the unfolding of Soviet-American detente. Here, too, are many other international crises of the period--the Indo-Pakistani War, the Yom Kippur War, the Angolan civil war--all set against the backdrop of Watergate. Along the way, Hanhimaki sheds light on Kissinger's personal flaws--he was obsessed with secrecy and bureaucratic infighting in an administration that self-destructed in its abuse of power--as well as his great strengths as a diplomat. We see Kissinger negotiating, threatening and joking with virtually all of the key foreign leaders of the 1970s, from Mao to Brezhnev and Anwar Sadat to Golda Meir. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.
Main Description
Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated détente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombing of Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. Which is more accurate, the picture of Kissinger the skilled diplomat or Kissinger the war criminal? InThe Flawed Architect, the first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade, historian Jussi Hanhimaki paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman. Drawing on extensive research from newly declassified files, the author follows Kissinger from his beginnings in the Nixon administration up to the current controversy fed by Christopher Hitchens over whether Kissinger is a war criminal. Hanhimaki guides the reader through White House power struggles and debates behind the Cambodia and Laos invasions, the search for a strategy in Vietnam, the breakthrough with China, and the unfolding of Soviet-American detente. Here, too, are many other international crises of the period--the Indo-Pakistani War, the Yom Kippur War, the Angolan civil war--all set against the backdrop of Watergate. Along the way, Hanhimaki sheds light on Kissinger's personal flaws--he was obsessed with secrecy and bureaucratic infighting in an administration that self-destructed in its abuse of power--as well as his great strengths as a diplomat. We see Kissinger negotiating, threatening and joking with virtually all of the key foreign leaders of the 1970s, from Mao to Brezhnev and Anwar Sadat to Golda Meir. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.
Short Annotation
First major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman.
Unpaid Annotation
This first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction A Prize-Winning Performance?p. xiii
The Aspiring Statesmanp. 1
Kissinger, Nixon, and the Challenges of '69p. 17
Bombs and Back Channelsp. 32
Progress and Promisep. 55
Negotiating in the Shadow of Warp. 68
Crises and Opportunitiesp. 92
Breakthroughsp. 116
Triangular Diplomacy and the Indo-Pakistani Warp. 154
"the Week That Changed the World"p. 185
Triangulation, Moscow, and Vietnamp. 201
Exiting Vietnamp. 228
Highs and Lowsp. 260
Secretary of Statep. 291
The October War and Shuttle Diplomacyp. 302
Watergate, Kissinger, and Foreign Policyp. 332
Renewal? Ford, Vladivostok, and Kissingerp. 359
Exit from Vietnamp. 382
Angola and East Timorp. 399
Kissinger and the Marathon of 1976p. 427
The Chairman "on Trial"p. 457
Conclusion: The Flawed Architectp. 485
Notesp. 493
Selected Bibliographyp. 535
Indexp. 541
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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